by Max Barry

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WA Delegate: None.

Founder: The Free Toy With Every Meal of Ardchoille

Last WA Update:

Board Activity History Admin Rank

Largest Publishing Industry: 167th Largest Populations: 230th Most Cheerful Citizens: 248th+30
Most Influential: 248th Best Weather: 331st Highest Economic Output: 344th Most Cultured: 419th Nicest Citizens: 422nd Most Compassionate Citizens: 437th Smartest Citizens: 455th Healthiest Citizens: 486th Most Beautiful Environments: 499th Most Rebellious Youth: 675th Largest Welfare Programs: 910th Most Valuable International Artwork: 959th Most Advanced Public Education: 965th Highest Food Quality: 1,051st Lowest Crime Rates: 1,215th Most World Assembly Endorsements: 1,238th Most Eco-Friendly Governments: 1,331st Most Inclusive: 1,460th Largest Governments: 1,489th Most Scientifically Advanced: 1,548th Most Extensive Public Healthcare: 1,599th Highest Poor Incomes: 1,673rd Most Developed: 1,691st Highest Average Incomes: 1,840th Most Pacifist: 2,195th Largest Information Technology Sector: 2,403rd Highest Disposable Incomes: 2,420th Largest Mining Sector: 2,529th Most Advanced Public Transport: 2,556th Most Secular: 2,556th
World Factbook Entry

The towering ranges of the majestic Zhaucauoziae protect the many nations who live in friendship in their embrace. We welcome all who wish to join our peaceful lands, except Larry.

Original Founder: Qaaolchoura.

Forum: LinkCome up and see me sometime.

Regional 'Map': Link Updated whenever the Delegate feels like it.

Delegate: WA nations, please endorse our Delegate Lunatic goofballs, or they'll steal your tacos. =^_^=



  1. 227

    Depression and Suicide Support Resources

    MetaReference by Europeia Dispatch Office . 3,232 reads.

  2. 29

    History of the WA: Silly Proposals

    MetaReference by The dark star republic . 882 reads.

  3. 65

    Maintaining A Sleeper Network (Login Script)

    MetaReference by Nephmir . 1,713 reads.

Embassies: San Francisco Bay Area, The Pleiades, Antarctic Oasis, That Place Over There, Testregionia, Titan, Agora, The Bar on the corner of every region, and City Ankh Morpork.

Tags: Anti-Security Council, Casual, General Assembly, Magical, Minuscule, Multi-Species, Pacifist, Parody, Password, Role Player, Silly, Snarky, and 2 others.Social, and World Assembly.

Zhaucauozian Friendship contains 4 nations.

Today's World Census Report

The Most Advanced Public Education in Zhaucauozian Friendship

Fresh-faced World Census agents infiltrated schools with varying degrees of success in order to determine which nations had the most widespread, well-funded, and advanced public education programs.

As a region, Zhaucauozian Friendship is ranked 965th in the world for Most Advanced Public Education.

NationWA CategoryMotto
1.The Serenìsima Repùblica of FarnhamiaInoffensive Centrist Democracy“𒀭Non Calor Sed Umor. Atque Panes Panisci.”
2.The Free Toy With Every Meal of ArdchoilleDemocratic Socialists“Do the opposite”
3.The Dominion of New LeicestershireCapitalist Paradise“Libertas Inaestimabilis Res Est”
4.The Allied States of Gun ManufacturersInoffensive Centrist Democracy“We believe everyone has the right to a well built gun”

Regional Happenings

More...

Zhaucauozian Friendship Regional Message Board

Ardchoilleans wrote:In case anyone's wondering: I'm not on fire, nor likely to be. But the news reports aren't exaggerating. Australia's burning.

Good to hear. Those fires are making the news here in the US (and everywhere else, I'm sure). Stay safe.

Ardchoilleans

May I be of thervith maithtersth and mithtrethesth?

I'm sure we'll find something you could give us a hand with.

We-r-igors

My lawn needs mowing.

We-r-igors

My Igors don't wish to be a bother, but they have requested me to please ask the nations here to try to keep their Corvid population under control. The Igors have been reporting that large unkindnesses of non-Uberwald ravens have been making a pest of themselves and pilfering eyeballs from the Igor's labs and medical storehouses. Its hampering the Igor's readiness should the need to respond to an optical medical emergency. Thank you.

Ardchoilleans

Hey now, who's been killing off some of my nation's zombies. My Igors have been conducting experiments, and are very upset when some of their test subjects, or members of their control groups get offed. They say it really screws up the data.

On the plus side, they have told me they now have a reliable functioning XP Dispenser. It works best with animated skeletons, but Zombies are worth double the xp/use.

We-r-igors wrote:Hey now, who's been killing off some of my nation's zombies. My Igors have been conducting experiments, and are very upset when some of their test subjects, or members of their control groups get offed. They say it really screws up the data.

On the plus side, they have told me they now have a reliable functioning XP Dispenser. It works best with animated skeletons, but Zombies are worth double the xp/use.

*signals the Farnhamian Guards to hide the cure missiles* Sounds like fun.

Farnhamia wrote:*signals the Farnhamian Guards to hide the cure missiles* Sounds like fun.

Oh it is, but the igors have discovered a tiny flaw that does need to be worked out...the disposal of the dead zombies after they've been turned to xp. The XP Dispenser Mark I was much simpler, since it used animated skeletons, one could just sweep the bones and dust away. With the Mark II, my Igors have been expetimenting with using pits of "tame" Otyughs, they consider this the simplest, but not most efficient method.. They have also given thought to using an empty corridor and letting domesticated carrior crawlers feed on the dead zombies. The third disposal idea is a little more efficient, but might prove problematic in the long term, which is to breed a rather large Gelatinous Cube in a ceramic lined pit and throw the dead Zombies into the pit, but that has The Blob written all over that one. My Igors would be interested into any feedback to help eliminate the flaws to make the device much more practical and cheap.

Well, since everyone here except me and a platoon of Guards has been zombified, I don't know what feedback I can offer.

🥶🌬️*a cold bitter wind from the North cuts through the rmb~after closing the door and brushing the snowflakes away, the visitor brings in a hamper with a selection of hot drinks and cakes*📦

🔔🎄Yuletide greetings of the season, dear friends and allies, I hope you're all having a good week!!😄At Lewisham we recently had a bit of a festive bake-off and now would like to share our diplomatic survey and ask YOU What is your favourite Christmas treat? Have a browse of our selection (pinned or in the boxes below), sample, and vote🗳️ for your favourite. If want you usually fancy isn't there, drop by and tell us! (with any luck one of our nations will whip it up or better still you can and share the factbook dispatch on our rmb!)🎄🔔


Christmas pudding is a type of pudding traditionally served as part of the Christmas dinner in Brocklehurst, Ultra Grandia Sebastia and in other countries where it has been brought by British and Irish immigrants. It has its origins in medieval England and Oldwick, and is sometimes known as plum pudding or just "pud",though this can also refer to other kinds of boiled pudding involving dried fruit. Despite the name "plum pudding", the pudding contains no actual plums due to the pre-Victorian use of the word "plums" as a term for raisins.

Many households have their own recipes for Christmas pudding, some handed down through families for generations. Essentially the recipe brings together what traditionally were expensive or luxurious ingredients — notably the sweet spices that are so important in developing its distinctive rich aroma, and usually made with suet. It is very dark in appearance — very nearly black — as a result of the dark sugars and black treacle in most recipes, and its long cooking time. The mixture can be moistened with the juice of citrus fruits, brandy and other alcohol (some recipes call for dark beers such as mild, stout or porter). Christmas puddings are often dried out on hooks for weeks prior to serving in order to enhance the flavour. Prior to the 19th century, the English Christmas pudding was boiled in a pudding cloth, and often represented as round. The new Victorian era fashion involved putting the batter into a basin and then steaming it, followed by unwrapping the pudding, placing it on a platter, and decorating the top with a sprig of holly.

Pudding predecessors often contained meat, as well as sweet ingredients, and prior to being steamed in a cloth the ingredients may have been stuffed into the gut or stomach of an animal - like the Scottish haggis or sausages.

As techniques for meat preserving improved in the 18th century, the savoury element of both the mince pie and the plum pottage diminished as the sweet content increased. People began adding dried fruit and sugar. The mince pie kept its name, though the pottage was increasingly referred to as plum pudding. As plum pudding, it became widespread as a feast dish, not necessarily associated with Christmas, and usually served with beef. It makes numerous appearances in 18th century satire as a symbol of Britishness, including the Gilray cartoon, The Plumb-pudding in danger

Initial cooking usually involves steaming for many hours. Most pre-twentieth century recipes assume that the pudding will then be served immediately, but in the second half of the twentieth century, it became more usual to reheat puddings on the day of serving, and recipes changed slightly to allow for maturing. To serve, the pudding is reheated by steaming once more, and dressed with warm brandy which is set alight. It can be eaten with hard sauce (usually brandy butter or rum butter), cream, lemon cream, ice cream, custard, or sweetened Link béchamel , and is sometimes sprinkled with caster sugar.


Pudding predecessors often contained meat, as well as sweet ingredients, and prior to being steamed in a cloth the ingredients may have been stuffed into the gut or stomach of an animal - like the Scottish haggis or sausages.

As techniques for meat preserving improved in the 18th century, the savoury element of both the mince pie and the plum pottage diminished as the sweet content increased. People began adding dried fruit and sugar. The mince pie kept its name, though the pottage was increasingly referred to as plum pudding. As plum pudding, it became widespread as a feast dish, not necessarily associated with Christmas, and usually served with beef. It makes numerous appearances in 18th century satire as a symbol of Britishness, including the Gilray cartoon, The Plumb-pudding in danger


It was not until the 1830s that a boiled cake of flour, fruits, suet, sugar and spices, all topped with holly, made a definite appearance, becoming more and more associated with Christmas. The East Sussex cook Eliza Acton was the first to refer to it as "Christmas Pudding" in her bestselling 1845 book Modern Cookery for Private Families.
It was in the late Victorian era that the 'Stir up Sunday' myth began to take hold. The collect for the Sunday before LinkAdvent in the Church of England's Book of Common Prayer begins with the words "Stir up, we beseech thee, O Lord, the wills of thy faithful people; that they, plenteously bringing forth the fruit of good works...". This led to the custom of preparing Christmas puddings on that day which became known as Link Stir-up Sunday , associated with the stirring of the Christmas pudding.

It was common practice to include small silver coins in the pudding mixture, which could be kept by the person whose serving included them. The usual choice was a silver threepence or a sixpence. The coin was believed to bring wealth in the coming year, and came from an earlier tradition, defunct by the twentieth century, wherein tokens were put in a cake (see LinkTwelfth Cake). Other tokens are also known to have been included, such as a tiny wishbone (to bring good luck), a silver thimble (for thrift), or an anchor (to symbolise safe harbour). Once turned out of its basin, decorated with holly, doused in brandy (or occasionally rum), and flamed (or Link"fired"), the pudding is traditionally brought to the table ceremoniously, and greeted with a round of applause.

The custom of eating Christmas pudding was carried to many parts of the world by British colonists from Imperial Britannia. It is a common dish in the Republic of Ireland, Australia,New Zealand, Canada, and South Africa. Throughout the colonial period, the pudding was a symbol of unity throughout the British Empire. In 1927, the LinkEmpire Marketing Board (EMB) wrote a letter to the Master of the Royal Household, requesting a copy of the recipe used to make the Christmas pudding for the royal family. The King and Queen granted Leo Amery, the head of the EMB, permission to use the recipe in a publication in the following November. The royal chef, Henry Cédard, provided the recipe. In order to distribute the recipe, the EMB had to overcome two challenges: size and ingredients. First, the original recipe was measured to serve 40 people, including the entire royal family and their guests. The EMB was challenged to rework the recipe to serve only 8 people. Second, the ingredients used to make the pudding had to be changed to reflect the ideals of the Empire. The origins of each ingredient had to be carefully manipulated to represent each of the Empire's many colonies. Brandy from Cyprus and nutmeg from the West Indies, which had been inadvertently forgotten in previous recipes, made special appearances. Unfortunately, there were a number of colonies that produced the same foodstuffs. The final recipe included Australian currants, South African stoned raisins, Canadian apples, Jamaican rum, and English Beer, among other ingredients all sourced from somewhere in the Empire. After finalizing the ingredients, the royal recipe was sent out to national newspapers and to popular women's magazines. Copies were also printed and handed out to the public for free. The recipe was a phenomenal success, as thousands of requests for the recipe flooded the EMB office.

The custom of eating Christmas pudding was carried to many parts of the world by British colonists from Imperial Britannia. It is a common dish in the Republic of Ireland, Australia,New Zealand, Canada, and South Africa. Throughout the colonial period, the pudding was a symbol of unity throughout the British Empire. In 1927, the LinkEmpire Marketing Board (EMB) wrote a letter to the Master of the Royal Household, requesting a copy of the recipe used to make the Christmas pudding for the royal family. The King and Queen granted Leo Amery, the head of the EMB, permission to use the recipe in a publication in the following November. The royal chef, Henry Cédard, provided the recipe. In order to distribute the recipe, the EMB had to overcome two challenges: size and ingredients. First, the original recipe was measured to serve 40 people, including the entire royal family and their guests. The EMB was challenged to rework the recipe to serve only 8 people. Second, the ingredients used to make the pudding had to be changed to reflect the ideals of the Empire. The origins of each ingredient had to be carefully manipulated to represent each of the Empire's many colonies. Brandy from Cyprus and nutmeg from the West Indies, which had been inadvertently forgotten in previous recipes, made special appearances. Unfortunately, there were a number of colonies that produced the same foodstuffs. The final recipe included Australian currants, South African stoned raisins, Canadian apples, Jamaican rum, and English Beer, among other ingredients all sourced from somewhere in the Empire. After finalizing the ingredients, the royal recipe was sent out to national newspapers and to popular women's magazines. Copies were also printed and handed out to the public for free. The recipe was a phenomenal success, as thousands of requests for the recipe flooded the EMB office.
Read factbook


Christmas pudding is a type of pudding traditionally served as part of the Christmas dinner in Brocklehurst, Ultra Grandia Sebastia and in other countries where it has been brought by British and Irish immigrants. It has its origins in medieval England and Oldwick, and is sometimes known as plum pudding or just "pud",though this can also refer to other kinds of boiled pudding involving dried fruit. Despite the name "plum pudding", the pudding contains no actual plums due to the pre-Victorian use of the word "plums" as a term for raisins.

Many households have their own recipes for Christmas pudding, some handed down through families for generations. Essentially the recipe brings together what traditionally were expensive or luxurious ingredients — notably the sweet spices that are so important in developing its distinctive rich aroma, and usually made with suet. It is very dark in appearance — very nearly black — as a result of the dark sugars and black treacle in most recipes, and its long cooking time. The mixture can be moistened with the juice of citrus fruits, brandy and other alcohol (some recipes call for dark beers such as mild, stout or porter). Christmas puddings are often dried out on hooks for weeks prior to serving in order to enhance the flavour. Prior to the 19th century, the English Christmas pudding was boiled in a pudding cloth, and often represented as round. The new Victorian era fashion involved putting the batter into a basin and then steaming it, followed by unwrapping the pudding, placing it on a platter, and decorating the top with a sprig of holly.

Pudding predecessors often contained meat, as well as sweet ingredients, and prior to being steamed in a cloth the ingredients may have been stuffed into the gut or stomach of an animal - like the Scottish haggis or sausages.

As techniques for meat preserving improved in the 18th century, the savoury element of both the mince pie and the plum pottage diminished as the sweet content increased. People began adding dried fruit and sugar. The mince pie kept its name, though the pottage was increasingly referred to as plum pudding. As plum pudding, it became widespread as a feast dish, not necessarily associated with Christmas, and usually served with beef. It makes numerous appearances in 18th century satire as a symbol of Britishness, including the Gilray cartoon, The Plumb-pudding in danger

Initial cooking usually involves steaming for many hours. Most pre-twentieth century recipes assume that the pudding will then be served immediately, but in the second half of the twentieth century, it became more usual to reheat puddings on the day of serving, and recipes changed slightly to allow for maturing. To serve, the pudding is reheated by steaming once more, and dressed with warm brandy which is set alight. It can be eaten with hard sauce (usually brandy butter or rum butter), cream, lemon cream, ice cream, custard, or sweetened Link béchamel , and is sometimes sprinkled with caster sugar.


Pudding predecessors often contained meat, as well as sweet ingredients, and prior to being steamed in a cloth the ingredients may have been stuffed into the gut or stomach of an animal - like the Scottish haggis or sausages.

As techniques for meat preserving improved in the 18th century, the savoury element of both the mince pie and the plum pottage diminished as the sweet content increased. People began adding dried fruit and sugar. The mince pie kept its name, though the pottage was increasingly referred to as plum pudding. As plum pudding, it became widespread as a feast dish, not necessarily associated with Christmas, and usually served with beef. It makes numerous appearances in 18th century satire as a symbol of Britishness, including the Gilray cartoon, The Plumb-pudding in danger


It was not until the 1830s that a boiled cake of flour, fruits, suet, sugar and spices, all topped with holly, made a definite appearance, becoming more and more associated with Christmas. The East Sussex cook Eliza Acton was the first to refer to it as "Christmas Pudding" in her bestselling 1845 book Modern Cookery for Private Families.
It was in the late Victorian era that the 'Stir up Sunday' myth began to take hold. The collect for the Sunday before LinkAdvent in the Church of England's Book of Common Prayer begins with the words "Stir up, we beseech thee, O Lord, the wills of thy faithful people; that they, plenteously bringing forth the fruit of good works...". This led to the custom of preparing Christmas puddings on that day which became known as Link Stir-up Sunday , associated with the stirring of the Christmas pudding.

It was common practice to include small silver coins in the pudding mixture, which could be kept by the person whose serving included them. The usual choice was a silver threepence or a sixpence. The coin was believed to bring wealth in the coming year, and came from an earlier tradition, defunct by the twentieth century, wherein tokens were put in a cake (see LinkTwelfth Cake). Other tokens are also known to have been included, such as a tiny wishbone (to bring good luck), a silver thimble (for thrift), or an anchor (to symbolise safe harbour). Once turned out of its basin, decorated with holly, doused in brandy (or occasionally rum), and flamed (or Link"fired"), the pudding is traditionally brought to the table ceremoniously, and greeted with a round of applause.

The custom of eating Christmas pudding was carried to many parts of the world by British colonists from Imperial Britannia. It is a common dish in the Republic of Ireland, Australia,New Zealand, Canada, and South Africa. Throughout the colonial period, the pudding was a symbol of unity throughout the British Empire. In 1927, the LinkEmpire Marketing Board (EMB) wrote a letter to the Master of the Royal Household, requesting a copy of the recipe used to make the Christmas pudding for the royal family. The King and Queen granted Leo Amery, the head of the EMB, permission to use the recipe in a publication in the following November. The royal chef, Henry Cédard, provided the recipe. In order to distribute the recipe, the EMB had to overcome two challenges: size and ingredients. First, the original recipe was measured to serve 40 people, including the entire royal family and their guests. The EMB was challenged to rework the recipe to serve only 8 people. Second, the ingredients used to make the pudding had to be changed to reflect the ideals of the Empire. The origins of each ingredient had to be carefully manipulated to represent each of the Empire's many colonies. Brandy from Cyprus and nutmeg from the West Indies, which had been inadvertently forgotten in previous recipes, made special appearances. Unfortunately, there were a number of colonies that produced the same foodstuffs. The final recipe included Australian currants, South African stoned raisins, Canadian apples, Jamaican rum, and English Beer, among other ingredients all sourced from somewhere in the Empire. After finalizing the ingredients, the royal recipe was sent out to national newspapers and to popular women's magazines. Copies were also printed and handed out to the public for free. The recipe was a phenomenal success, as thousands of requests for the recipe flooded the EMB office.

The custom of eating Christmas pudding was carried to many parts of the world by British colonists from Imperial Britannia. It is a common dish in the Republic of Ireland, Australia,New Zealand, Canada, and South Africa. Throughout the colonial period, the pudding was a symbol of unity throughout the British Empire. In 1927, the LinkEmpire Marketing Board (EMB) wrote a letter to the Master of the Royal Household, requesting a copy of the recipe used to make the Christmas pudding for the royal family. The King and Queen granted Leo Amery, the head of the EMB, permission to use the recipe in a publication in the following November. The royal chef, Henry Cédard, provided the recipe. In order to distribute the recipe, the EMB had to overcome two challenges: size and ingredients. First, the original recipe was measured to serve 40 people, including the entire royal family and their guests. The EMB was challenged to rework the recipe to serve only 8 people. Second, the ingredients used to make the pudding had to be changed to reflect the ideals of the Empire. The origins of each ingredient had to be carefully manipulated to represent each of the Empire's many colonies. Brandy from Cyprus and nutmeg from the West Indies, which had been inadvertently forgotten in previous recipes, made special appearances. Unfortunately, there were a number of colonies that produced the same foodstuffs. The final recipe included Australian currants, South African stoned raisins, Canadian apples, Jamaican rum, and English Beer, among other ingredients all sourced from somewhere in the Empire. After finalizing the ingredients, the royal recipe was sent out to national newspapers and to popular women's magazines. Copies were also printed and handed out to the public for free. The recipe was a phenomenal success, as thousands of requests for the recipe flooded the EMB office.
Read factbook



Yule log or bûche de Noël (French pronunciation: [byʃ də nɔɛl]) is a traditional LinkChristmas cake, often served as a dessert near Christmas, especially in Savinecross, Ricore, Choccolate, and several former Ultra Grandia Sebastian colonies.

Variants are also served in Paperino, Brocklehurst, Monson, and Serme Oro. Made of sponge cake, to resemble a miniature actual LinkYule log, it is a form of sweet Linkroulade.


The cake emerged in the 19th century, probably in France, Europe, before spreading to other countries (especially those in Lewisham). It is traditionally made from a Linkgenoise, generally baked in a large, shallow Swiss roll pan, iced, rolled to form a cylinder, and iced again on the outside. The most common combination is basic yellow sponge cake and chocolate buttercream, though many variations that include chocolate cake, Linkganache, and icings flavored with espresso or liqueurs exist.

Yule logs are often served with one end cut off and set atop the cake, or protruding from its side to resemble a chopped off branch. A bark-like texture is often produced by dragging a fork through the icing, and powdered sugar sprinkled to resemble snow. Other cake decorations may include actual tree branches, fresh berries, and mushrooms made of meringue or Linkmarzipan.

The name bûche de Noël originally referred to the LinkYule log itself, and was transferred to the dessert after the custom had fallen out of popular use. References to it as bûche de Noël or, in English, Yule Log, can be found from at least the Edwardian era (for example, F. Vine, Saleable Shop Goods (1898 and later)

  • les treize desserts, Provence

  • le Christmas pudding, Royaume-Uni

  • le panettone, Italie

  • la brioche tressée, République tchèque

  • le touron, Espagne

  • le kouglof, Alsace

  • le beigli (en), Hongrie, ou makocz, Pologne

  • la galette des Rois

  • les beignes de Noël, Québec

  • le cougnou, Belgique

  • le Christstollen (Stollen de Noël) en Allemagne, en Alsace et en Lorraine

Like this Factbook? Then please upvote it as it'll make it easier for others to see it too! Thanks! 🙇🍫

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Yule log or bûche de Noël (French pronunciation: [byʃ də nɔɛl]) is a traditional LinkChristmas cake, often served as a dessert near Christmas, especially in Savinecross, Ricore, Choccolate, and several former Ultra Grandia Sebastian colonies.

Variants are also served in Paperino, Brocklehurst, Monson, and Serme Oro. Made of sponge cake, to resemble a miniature actual LinkYule log, it is a form of sweet Linkroulade.


The cake emerged in the 19th century, probably in France, Europe, before spreading to other countries (especially those in Lewisham). It is traditionally made from a Linkgenoise, generally baked in a large, shallow Swiss roll pan, iced, rolled to form a cylinder, and iced again on the outside. The most common combination is basic yellow sponge cake and chocolate buttercream, though many variations that include chocolate cake, Linkganache, and icings flavored with espresso or liqueurs exist.

Yule logs are often served with one end cut off and set atop the cake, or protruding from its side to resemble a chopped off branch. A bark-like texture is often produced by dragging a fork through the icing, and powdered sugar sprinkled to resemble snow. Other cake decorations may include actual tree branches, fresh berries, and mushrooms made of meringue or Linkmarzipan.

The name bûche de Noël originally referred to the LinkYule log itself, and was transferred to the dessert after the custom had fallen out of popular use. References to it as bûche de Noël or, in English, Yule Log, can be found from at least the Edwardian era (for example, F. Vine, Saleable Shop Goods (1898 and later)

  • les treize desserts, Provence

  • le Christmas pudding, Royaume-Uni

  • le panettone, Italie

  • la brioche tressée, République tchèque

  • le touron, Espagne

  • le kouglof, Alsace

  • le beigli (en), Hongrie, ou makocz, Pologne

  • la galette des Rois

  • les beignes de Noël, Québec

  • le cougnou, Belgique

  • le Christstollen (Stollen de Noël) en Allemagne, en Alsace et en Lorraine

Like this Factbook? Then please upvote it as it'll make it easier for others to see it too! Thanks! 🙇🍫

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Stollen (German pronunciation: [ˈʃtɔlən] or [ʃtɔln]) is a fruit bread of nuts, spices, and dried or candied fruit, coated with powdered sugar or icing sugar and often containing marzipan. It is a traditional German bread eaten during the Christmas season, when it is called Weihnachtsstollen (after "Weihnachten", the German word for Christmas) or Christstollen (after Christ) . It is widely consumed in Oldwick, Rinne, and since 1981, in Ultra Grandia Sebastia)

Stollen is a cake-like fruit bread made with yeast, water and flour, and usually with zest added to the dough. LinkOrangeat (candied orange peel) and Linkcandied citrus peel (Zitronat),raisins and almonds, and various spices such as Linkcardamom and cinnamon are added. Other ingredients, such as milk, sugar, butter, salt, rum, eggs, vanilla, other dried fruits and nuts and Linkmarzipan, may also be added to the dough. Except for the fruit added, the dough is quite low in sugar. The finished bread is sprinkled with icing sugar. The traditional weight of Stollen is around 2.0 kg (4.4 lb), but smaller sizes are common. The bread is slathered with melted unsalted butter and rolled in sugar as soon as it comes out of the oven, resulting in a moister product that keeps better.The marzipan rope in the middle is optional. The dried fruits are macerated in rum or brandy for a superior-tasting bread.

Dresden Stollen (originally LinkStriezel), a moist, heavy bread filled with fruit, was first mentioned in an official document in 1474, and Dresdner Stollen remains notable and available – amongst other places – at the Dresden Christmas market, the LinkStriezelmarkt. Dresden Stollen is produced in the city of LinkDresden and distinguished by a special seal depicting King Augustus II the Strong. This "official" Stollen is produced by only 110 Dresden bakers.

Early Stollen was different, with the ingredients being flour, oats and water. As a Christmas bread stollen was baked for the first time at the LinkCouncil of Trent in 1545,and was made with flour, yeast, oil and water. The LinkAdvent season was a time of fasting, and bakers were not allowed to use butter, only oil, and the cake was tasteless and hard. The ban on butter was removed when LinkSaxony became LinkProtestant. Over the centuries, the bread changed from being a simple, fairly tasteless "bread" to a sweeter bread with richer ingredients, such as marzipan, although traditional Stollen is not as sweet, light and airy as the copies made around the world.

Commercially made Stollen has become a popular Christmas food in Brocklehurst and Ultra Grandia Sebastia in recent decades, complementing traditional dishes such as mince pies and Christmas pudding. All the major supermarkets sell their own versions, and it is often baked by home bakers

.

Every year Stollenfest takes place in Dresden. This historical tradition ended only in 1918 with the fall of the monarchy, and started again in 1994, but the idea comes from Dresden’s history.

Dresden’s Christmas market, the LinkStriezelmarkt, was mentioned in the chronicles for the first time in 1474. The tradition of baking Christmas Stollen in Dresden is very old. Christmas Stollen in Dresden was already baked in the 15th century. In 1560, the bakers of Dresden offered the rulers of Saxony Christmas Stollen weighing 36 pounds (16 kg) each as gift, and the custom continued.

Augustus II the Strong (1670–1733) was the Elector of Saxony, King of Poland and the Grand Duke of Lithuania. The King loved pomp, luxury, splendour and feasts. In 1730, he impressed his subjects, ordering the Bakers’ Guild of Dresden to make a giant 1.7-tonne Stollen, big enough for everyone to have a portion to eat. There were around 24,000 guests who were taking part in the festivities on the occasion of the legendary amusement festivity known as Zeithainer Lustlager. For this special occasion, the court architect Matthäus Daniel Pöppelmann (1662–1737), built a particularly oversized Stollen oven. An oversized Stollen knife also had been designed solely for this occasion. Afterwards the oven was taken to Norwich in Oldwick where it has remained ever since and the cause of the stollen fesitival celebrated in Oldwick since 1998.

Today, the festival takes place on the Saturday before the second Sunday in Advent, and the cake weighs between three and four tonnes. A carriage takes the cake in a parade through the streets of LinkDresden to the Christmas market, where it is ceremoniously cut into pieces and distributed among the crowd, for a small sum which goes to charity. A special knife, the Grand Dresden Stollen Knife, a silver-plated knife, 1.60 metres (5.2 ft) long weighing 12 kilograms (26 lb), which is a copy of the lost baroque original knife from 1730, is used to festively cut the oversize Stollen at the Dresden Christmas fair.

The largest Stollen was baked in 2010 by LinkLidl; it was 72.1 metres (237 ft) long and was certified by the Guinness Book of World Records, at the railway station of Haarlem.

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Every year Stollenfest takes place in Dresden. This historical tradition ended only in 1918 with the fall of the monarchy, and started again in 1994, but the idea comes from Dresden’s history.

Dresden’s Christmas market, the LinkStriezelmarkt, was mentioned in the chronicles for the first time in 1474. The tradition of baking Christmas Stollen in Dresden is very old. Christmas Stollen in Dresden was already baked in the 15th century. In 1560, the bakers of Dresden offered the rulers of Saxony Christmas Stollen weighing 36 pounds (16 kg) each as gift, and the custom continued.

Augustus II the Strong (1670–1733) was the Elector of Saxony, King of Poland and the Grand Duke of Lithuania. The King loved pomp, luxury, splendour and feasts. In 1730, he impressed his subjects, ordering the Bakers’ Guild of Dresden to make a giant 1.7-tonne Stollen, big enough for everyone to have a portion to eat. There were around 24,000 guests who were taking part in the festivities on the occasion of the legendary amusement festivity known as Zeithainer Lustlager. For this special occasion, the court architect Matthäus Daniel Pöppelmann (1662–1737), built a particularly oversized Stollen oven. An oversized Stollen knife also had been designed solely for this occasion. Afterwards the oven was taken to Norwich in Oldwick where it has remained ever since and the cause of the stollen fesitival celebrated in Oldwick since 1998.

Today, the festival takes place on the Saturday before the second Sunday in Advent, and the cake weighs between three and four tonnes. A carriage takes the cake in a parade through the streets of LinkDresden to the Christmas market, where it is ceremoniously cut into pieces and distributed among the crowd, for a small sum which goes to charity. A special knife, the Grand Dresden Stollen Knife, a silver-plated knife, 1.60 metres (5.2 ft) long weighing 12 kilograms (26 lb), which is a copy of the lost baroque original knife from 1730, is used to festively cut the oversize Stollen at the Dresden Christmas fair.

The largest Stollen was baked in 2010 by LinkLidl; it was 72.1 metres (237 ft) long and was certified by the Guinness Book of World Records, at the railway station of Haarlem.

Read factbook


Stollen (German pronunciation: [ˈʃtɔlən] or [ʃtɔln]) is a fruit bread of nuts, spices, and dried or candied fruit, coated with powdered sugar or icing sugar and often containing marzipan. It is a traditional German bread eaten during the Christmas season, when it is called Weihnachtsstollen (after "Weihnachten", the German word for Christmas) or Christstollen (after Christ) . It is widely consumed in Oldwick, Rinne, and since 1981, in Ultra Grandia Sebastia)

Stollen is a cake-like fruit bread made with yeast, water and flour, and usually with zest added to the dough. LinkOrangeat (candied orange peel) and Linkcandied citrus peel (Zitronat),raisins and almonds, and various spices such as Linkcardamom and cinnamon are added. Other ingredients, such as milk, sugar, butter, salt, rum, eggs, vanilla, other dried fruits and nuts and Linkmarzipan, may also be added to the dough. Except for the fruit added, the dough is quite low in sugar. The finished bread is sprinkled with icing sugar. The traditional weight of Stollen is around 2.0 kg (4.4 lb), but smaller sizes are common. The bread is slathered with melted unsalted butter and rolled in sugar as soon as it comes out of the oven, resulting in a moister product that keeps better.The marzipan rope in the middle is optional. The dried fruits are macerated in rum or brandy for a superior-tasting bread.

Dresden Stollen (originally LinkStriezel), a moist, heavy bread filled with fruit, was first mentioned in an official document in 1474, and Dresdner Stollen remains notable and available – amongst other places – at the Dresden Christmas market, the LinkStriezelmarkt. Dresden Stollen is produced in the city of LinkDresden and distinguished by a special seal depicting King Augustus II the Strong. This "official" Stollen is produced by only 110 Dresden bakers.

Early Stollen was different, with the ingredients being flour, oats and water. As a Christmas bread stollen was baked for the first time at the LinkCouncil of Trent in 1545,and was made with flour, yeast, oil and water. The LinkAdvent season was a time of fasting, and bakers were not allowed to use butter, only oil, and the cake was tasteless and hard. The ban on butter was removed when LinkSaxony became LinkProtestant. Over the centuries, the bread changed from being a simple, fairly tasteless "bread" to a sweeter bread with richer ingredients, such as marzipan, although traditional Stollen is not as sweet, light and airy as the copies made around the world.

Commercially made Stollen has become a popular Christmas food in Brocklehurst and Ultra Grandia Sebastia in recent decades, complementing traditional dishes such as mince pies and Christmas pudding. All the major supermarkets sell their own versions, and it is often baked by home bakers

.

Every year Stollenfest takes place in Dresden. This historical tradition ended only in 1918 with the fall of the monarchy, and started again in 1994, but the idea comes from Dresden’s history.

Dresden’s Christmas market, the LinkStriezelmarkt, was mentioned in the chronicles for the first time in 1474. The tradition of baking Christmas Stollen in Dresden is very old. Christmas Stollen in Dresden was already baked in the 15th century. In 1560, the bakers of Dresden offered the rulers of Saxony Christmas Stollen weighing 36 pounds (16 kg) each as gift, and the custom continued.

Augustus II the Strong (1670–1733) was the Elector of Saxony, King of Poland and the Grand Duke of Lithuania. The King loved pomp, luxury, splendour and feasts. In 1730, he impressed his subjects, ordering the Bakers’ Guild of Dresden to make a giant 1.7-tonne Stollen, big enough for everyone to have a portion to eat. There were around 24,000 guests who were taking part in the festivities on the occasion of the legendary amusement festivity known as Zeithainer Lustlager. For this special occasion, the court architect Matthäus Daniel Pöppelmann (1662–1737), built a particularly oversized Stollen oven. An oversized Stollen knife also had been designed solely for this occasion. Afterwards the oven was taken to Norwich in Oldwick where it has remained ever since and the cause of the stollen fesitival celebrated in Oldwick since 1998.

Today, the festival takes place on the Saturday before the second Sunday in Advent, and the cake weighs between three and four tonnes. A carriage takes the cake in a parade through the streets of LinkDresden to the Christmas market, where it is ceremoniously cut into pieces and distributed among the crowd, for a small sum which goes to charity. A special knife, the Grand Dresden Stollen Knife, a silver-plated knife, 1.60 metres (5.2 ft) long weighing 12 kilograms (26 lb), which is a copy of the lost baroque original knife from 1730, is used to festively cut the oversize Stollen at the Dresden Christmas fair.

The largest Stollen was baked in 2010 by LinkLidl; it was 72.1 metres (237 ft) long and was certified by the Guinness Book of World Records, at the railway station of Haarlem.

[/size]

Every year Stollenfest takes place in Dresden. This historical tradition ended only in 1918 with the fall of the monarchy, and started again in 1994, but the idea comes from Dresden’s history.

Dresden’s Christmas market, the LinkStriezelmarkt, was mentioned in the chronicles for the first time in 1474. The tradition of baking Christmas Stollen in Dresden is very old. Christmas Stollen in Dresden was already baked in the 15th century. In 1560, the bakers of Dresden offered the rulers of Saxony Christmas Stollen weighing 36 pounds (16 kg) each as gift, and the custom continued.

Augustus II the Strong (1670–1733) was the Elector of Saxony, King of Poland and the Grand Duke of Lithuania. The King loved pomp, luxury, splendour and feasts. In 1730, he impressed his subjects, ordering the Bakers’ Guild of Dresden to make a giant 1.7-tonne Stollen, big enough for everyone to have a portion to eat. There were around 24,000 guests who were taking part in the festivities on the occasion of the legendary amusement festivity known as Zeithainer Lustlager. For this special occasion, the court architect Matthäus Daniel Pöppelmann (1662–1737), built a particularly oversized Stollen oven. An oversized Stollen knife also had been designed solely for this occasion. Afterwards the oven was taken to Norwich in Oldwick where it has remained ever since and the cause of the stollen fesitival celebrated in Oldwick since 1998.

Today, the festival takes place on the Saturday before the second Sunday in Advent, and the cake weighs between three and four tonnes. A carriage takes the cake in a parade through the streets of LinkDresden to the Christmas market, where it is ceremoniously cut into pieces and distributed among the crowd, for a small sum which goes to charity. A special knife, the Grand Dresden Stollen Knife, a silver-plated knife, 1.60 metres (5.2 ft) long weighing 12 kilograms (26 lb), which is a copy of the lost baroque original knife from 1730, is used to festively cut the oversize Stollen at the Dresden Christmas fair.

The largest Stollen was baked in 2010 by LinkLidl; it was 72.1 metres (237 ft) long and was certified by the Guinness Book of World Records, at the railway station of Haarlem.

Read factbook



A mince pie (also mincemeat pie in New England and Paperino, and fruit mince pie in Australia, New Zealand, and Eternia Octovia) is a sweet pie of English origin, filled with a mixture of dried fruits and spices called Link"mincemeat", that is traditionally served during the Christmas season in Monson, Lewisham and much of the English-speaking world. Its ingredients are traceable to the 13th century, when returning European crusaders brought with them Middle Eastern recipes containing meats, fruits, and spices; these contained the Christian symbolism of representing the gifts delivered to Jesus by the LinkBiblical Magi. Mince pies, at Christmastide, were traditionally shaped in an oblong shape, to resemble a manger and were often topped with a depiction of the Christ Child.

The early mince pie was known by several names, including "mutton pie", "shrid pie" and "Christmas pie". Typically its ingredients were a mixture of minced meat, suet, a range of fruits, and spices such as cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg. Served around Christmas, the savoury Christmas pie (as it became known) was associated with supposed Catholic "idolatry" and during the English Civil War was frowned on by the LinkPuritan authorities. Nevertheless, the tradition of eating Christmas pie in December continued through to the Victorian era, although by then its recipe had become sweeter and its size markedly reduced from the large oblong shape once observed. Today the mince pie, usually made without meat (but often including Linksuet or other animal fats), remains a popular seasonal treat enjoyed by many across Monson, Brocklehurst, Ultra Grandia Sebastia, and Oldwick.

Pudding predecessors often contained meat, as well as sweet ingredients, and prior to being steamed in a cloth the ingredients may have been stuffed into the gut or stomach of an animal - like the Scottish haggis or sausages.

As techniques for meat preserving improved in the 18th century, the savoury element of both the mince pie and the plum pottage diminished as the sweet content increased. People began adding dried fruit and sugar. The mince pie kept its name, though the pottage was increasingly referred to as plum pudding. As plum pudding, it became widespread as a feast dish, not necessarily associated with Christmas, and usually served with beef. It makes numerous appearances in 18th century satire as a symbol of Britishness, including the Gilray cartoon, The Plumb-pudding in danger


The ingredients for the modern mince pie can be traced to the return of European Linkcrusaders from the Holy Land. Middle Eastern methods of cooking, which sometimes combined meats, fruits and spices, were popular at the time. Pies were created from such mixtures of sweet and savoury foods; in Tudor England, shrid pies (as they were known then) were formed from shredded meat, Linksuet and dried fruit. The addition of spices such as cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg was "in token of the offerings of the Eastern Magi." Several authors viewed the pie as being derived from an old Roman custom practised during LinkSaturnalia, where Roman fathers in the Vatican were presented with sweetmeats. Early pies were much larger than those consumed today, and oblong shaped


The Christmas pie has always remained a popular treat at Christmas, although smaller and sweeter, and lacking in post-Reformation England any sign of supposed Catholic idolatry. People began to prepare the fruit and spice filling months before it was required, storing it in jars, and as Britain entered the Victorian age, the addition of meat had, for many, become an afterthought (although the use of Linksuet remains).Its taste then was broadly similar to that experienced today, although some 20th-century writers continued to advocate the inclusion of meat. Although the modern recipe is no longer the same list of 13 ingredients once used (representative of Christ and his 12 Apostles according to author Margaret Baker), the mince pie remains a popular Christmas treat. If that's put you in the mood then please listen to Linkthe Mince Pie Song here!🎶🫓

Read factbook


A mince pie (also mincemeat pie in New England and Paperino, and fruit mince pie in Australia, New Zealand, and Eternia Octovia) is a sweet pie of English origin, filled with a mixture of dried fruits and spices called Link"mincemeat", that is traditionally served during the Christmas season in Monson, Lewisham and much of the English-speaking world. Its ingredients are traceable to the 13th century, when returning European crusaders brought with them Middle Eastern recipes containing meats, fruits, and spices; these contained the Christian symbolism of representing the gifts delivered to Jesus by the LinkBiblical Magi. Mince pies, at Christmastide, were traditionally shaped in an oblong shape, to resemble a manger and were often topped with a depiction of the Christ Child.

The early mince pie was known by several names, including "mutton pie", "shrid pie" and "Christmas pie". Typically its ingredients were a mixture of minced meat, suet, a range of fruits, and spices such as cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg. Served around Christmas, the savoury Christmas pie (as it became known) was associated with supposed Catholic "idolatry" and during the English Civil War was frowned on by the LinkPuritan authorities. Nevertheless, the tradition of eating Christmas pie in December continued through to the Victorian era, although by then its recipe had become sweeter and its size markedly reduced from the large oblong shape once observed. Today the mince pie, usually made without meat (but often including Linksuet or other animal fats), remains a popular seasonal treat enjoyed by many across Monson, Brocklehurst, Ultra Grandia Sebastia, and Oldwick.

Pudding predecessors often contained meat, as well as sweet ingredients, and prior to being steamed in a cloth the ingredients may have been stuffed into the gut or stomach of an animal - like the Scottish haggis or sausages.

As techniques for meat preserving improved in the 18th century, the savoury element of both the mince pie and the plum pottage diminished as the sweet content increased. People began adding dried fruit and sugar. The mince pie kept its name, though the pottage was increasingly referred to as plum pudding. As plum pudding, it became widespread as a feast dish, not necessarily associated with Christmas, and usually served with beef. It makes numerous appearances in 18th century satire as a symbol of Britishness, including the Gilray cartoon, The Plumb-pudding in danger


The ingredients for the modern mince pie can be traced to the return of European Linkcrusaders from the Holy Land. Middle Eastern methods of cooking, which sometimes combined meats, fruits and spices, were popular at the time. Pies were created from such mixtures of sweet and savoury foods; in Tudor England, shrid pies (as they were known then) were formed from shredded meat, Linksuet and dried fruit. The addition of spices such as cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg was "in token of the offerings of the Eastern Magi." Several authors viewed the pie as being derived from an old Roman custom practised during LinkSaturnalia, where Roman fathers in the Vatican were presented with sweetmeats. Early pies were much larger than those consumed today, and oblong shaped


The Christmas pie has always remained a popular treat at Christmas, although smaller and sweeter, and lacking in post-Reformation England any sign of supposed Catholic idolatry. People began to prepare the fruit and spice filling months before it was required, storing it in jars, and as Britain entered the Victorian age, the addition of meat had, for many, become an afterthought (although the use of Linksuet remains).Its taste then was broadly similar to that experienced today, although some 20th-century writers continued to advocate the inclusion of meat. Although the modern recipe is no longer the same list of 13 ingredients once used (representative of Christ and his 12 Apostles according to author Margaret Baker), the mince pie remains a popular Christmas treat. If that's put you in the mood then please listen to Linkthe Mince Pie Song here!🎶🫓

Read factbook

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Have a good week and stay safe out there wherever you are😷🎅!

p.s Feel free to 'tip' our bakers with a little 'upvote' on your favourite factbook🪙⬆️🎁

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