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«12. . .22,27822,27922,28022,28122,28222,28322,284. . .22,29822,299»

Scantarbia wrote:Remove the "Hi" in Himalaya and you'll never meet snow your entire life.

Would mean sea...I have never seen the sea either...

I hate my life.

Athara Magarat wrote:Would mean sea...I have never seen the sea either...

I hate my life.

Imagine a lot of water.

That's the sea. You're not missing much

New Aapelistan wrote:That's because you haven't lived 17 years in middle of snow

I have been living close to France for over 12 years though.

Athara Magarat wrote:Would mean sea...I have never seen the sea either...

I hate my life.

Come to NZ get both

some absolutely minor detail that I mentioned somewhere in a news post but I want to get more in-depth on it

I got basic internal links set up on my hub factbook, now I just need to actually fill the other factbooks.

Parliamentary elections in Nhoor on the 1st of December (Sunday). Exciting stuff!

(Although the national parliament is elected by the provincial parliaments (who in turn were elected in the last couple of weeks) and the national result may reflect the combined provincial results, there could be some surprises after all: political parties can contest the elections on the national level if they participate in at least one third of the provinces (5) representing at least one third of the total amount of seats in the national parliament (67 of 199; each province is represented by a certain number of seats in the national parliament). This means that members of local provincial parties cannot vote for their own parties.)

Nhoor wrote:Parliamentary elections in Nhoor on the 1st of December (Sunday). Exciting stuff!

(Although the national parliament is elected by the provincial parliaments (who in turn were elected in the last couple of weeks) and the national result may reflect the combined provincial results, there could be some surprises after all: political parties can contest the elections on the national level if they participate in at least one third of the provinces (5) representing at least one third of the total amount of seats in the national parliament (67 of 199; each province is represented by a certain number of seats in the national parliament). This means that members of local provincial parties cannot vote for their own parties.)

I'm giving myself December to nationbuild, but I'ma run Worker's Party elections in January 2020.

This is some very basic layout work for the Worker's Party Website. How does it look, noting I'll be adding graphics and whatnot?



M--C--W
MUANG CHONBI WUAU





ABOUT


The Muang Worker's Party formed in 1936 to protect the rights of the Muang Proletariat and Working Class in response to foreign aggression and to aid the State in the progression of goals of Equality and Democracy. For more than 80 years we have fought for a Socialist Future for the Kingdom of Muangsha that remains true to our unique Muang culture and outlook. Our revolutionary ideals hold true with both the People's Commitment to Faith and to Liberty from Oppression. We support our King as an embodiment of our divine and supreme Monkey King, and the State as an extension of the Will of the People. Through Constant Revolution we maintain and push for a country that represents the Muang Worker. We control and maintain the Worker's Committee of Muangsha so as to ensure that these Great Ideals are held True and Eternal in all acts of the State.

We represent the Voice of the Common Man and oppose any and all attacks upon their Rights and Freedoms as Workers in the Muangese State. We represent Socialism through the eyes of Muang Culture, and are dedicated to its expansion within Muangsha and Abroad. Working Class Power, domestically and internationally, represents the strongest step towards True Democracy as a Rule of the People. Our constituency is the Working Class and all who have been Oppressed and Repressed by Business and the Capitalist Class. To this end, we adhere to the Ideals of Buongism and seek to Unite All who Fight For Socialism. We stand behind a Revolution of the Working Class across the World. As such, the Muang Worker's Party stands behind Cooperative Socialist Internationalism.

The Muang Worker's Party seeks to hold the Entrenched Powers of Muangsha accountable at all times to the Will of the Worker and the Common Man. We will Enforce this Will by all the means at our disposal, and will seek to ensure a Service to the People is the Highest Duty of the State.


BUONGISM: A SUMMARY


Originally formulated by Buong-chibuji in 1948, the theory which would come to be known as Buongism is a theory of Communist thought created in response to Marxism-Leninism in respect to the unique elements of Muangsha's culture, religion and physical location. From a practical perspective, Buong noted that the idea of "communism in one country," as seen in the form of the USSR, could not be achieved in Muangsha. An intrinsic reliance on the outside world was central to Muangsha's survival as a city-state. In addition, recognition of the Monkey King's presence on Mua is undeniable. Therefore, the removal of the King from a presence in government would be heretical and anti-Muang. As such, many aspects of "traditional" Marxism-Leninism were seen to be impossible barring a worldwide revolution, and Buong was critical of Trotskyist ideals. While a Marxist-Leninist ideal was, Buong theorized, the potential apex of a universal communist system given proper adherence to its ideals, revolution in Muangsha would not be attainable under its classical purview.

Buong reformulated several core concepts of Marxist-Leninist dogma. Initially, he saw the Worker's Party as the upholders of the vanguard, and sought to integrate into the standard election process for council. However, following the revolution in 1958, Buongism came to point to the Worker's Committee as the vanguard party, with it representing an assurance of representation from the Party. The Party was to represent the Will of the People, and the Committee was to be its Voice in action.

Following the Worker's Uprising, Buong formulated the ideal of Constant Revolution; the Party was to exercise constant pressure through the power of the Committee to ensure the revolution continued in perpetuity against the Council. The Committee was to ensure a continuous revolutionary sentiment was present in government, to bring Muangsha into alignment with absolute socialism over the course of time as the world inevitably shifted towards a socialist world order.

Above all else, Buongism expresses the centrality of the worker to the ideal of communism. All other worries are secondary to ensuring that the Working Class is ascendant and in control of their own destiny. Buong referred to what he called "working class practicality," which he held as the highest possible virtue of the Working Class; a Worker makes things function with the resources provided. Buong was willing, and in fact encouraged, an acceptance of slow change in order to take practical steps towards constant revolution. Taking "what works" from various theoretical models was critical, Buong stated.

Buong's theoretical successors were quick to adopt the practical aspects of other socialist models where they could, especially from Deng Xiaoping Thought. The functionality of the Muang model of socialism was their greatest concern. Buongism, in its modern form, seeks to balance traditional Muang values and culture against a practical development of socialism in the State through the utility of the Committee as arm of the dictatorship of the proletariat.


A HISTORY OF SOCIALISM IN MUANGSHA



JOINING AND MEMBERSHIP


Joining the Party is a voluntary effort on the part of any worker of the Muang State. In order to qualify for membership, a prospective member must: 1) be a citizen of Muangsha and currently live in the city; 2) be employed in an industry considered consistent with the ideals of the Worker's Party, and; 3) receive a recommendation from a current Party member.

If one meets these criteria, they may contact their local district Party headquarters, where they can fill out the requisite forms, pay starting dues, and make their Party oaths. A member must pay their annual dues and reaffirm these oaths on an annual basis. Membership in the Party provides members the rights and protections of the Party, including the right to vote in all Party elections, both for leadership and for the Committee, engage in Party meetings to dictate Party policy, and provides the legislative protections accorded to Party members as Workers in the Muang State.

Below is a list of each local Party headquarters, separated by district:



Wiākīnamāng District

    1. Wuafāwīng Wuafīnā 1121-B/C
    2. Wuafāwīng Wuafīnā 2693
    3. Wuafāwīng Mung 721

Wiāshuzong District

    1. Wuafāwīng Mung 1987
    2. Wuafāwīng Mīnu 50-A

Wuoshin District

    1. Wuafāwīng Kutsun 266
    2. Wuafāwīng Kutsun 78-11
    3. Wuafāwīng Kutsun 163
    4. Wuafāwīng Wuoshukāng 121
    5. Wuafāwīng Wuoshukāng 200-A

Wuaxufong District

    1. Wuafāwīng Wiāwīnāchon 5
    2. Wuafāwīng Wiāwīnāchon 88-3
    3. Wuafāwīng English 440

Shān District

    1. Shīngapīng Wuayonalon 3

Wuatsumong District

    1. Wuafāwīng Wuoloyong 9-C1
    2. Wuafāwīng Wuolopung 224
    3. Shīngapīng Wiāchonānīn 65

Wuoshā District

    1. Wuafāwīng Wuoloyong 67
    2. Wuafāwīng Wuoshā 17-1

Konāfāng District

    1. Wuafāwīng Wuoloyong 891
    2. Wuafāwīng Konāfāng 10
    3. Wuafāwīng Konāfāng 54
    4. Wuafāwīng Konāfāng 166

Wiāshānawung District

    1. Shīngapīng Wiāshānawung 1

Kingābong District

    1. Wuafāwīng Wiāmun 4
    2. Wuafāwīng Wiāmun 77

Wiāmān District

    1. Wuafāwīng Wiāmikungako 85
    2. Wuafāwīng Wiāmikungako 111-F1

Fingā District

    1. Wuafāwīng Biko 113-1
    2. Wuafāwīng Biko 288
    3. Wuafāwīng Wuafīnā 45

Sīxung District

    1. Shīngapīng Chānā 6
    2. Wuafāwīng Chānā 88
    3. Wuafāwīng Bifung 761
    4. Wuafāwīng Bing 91-D
    5. Bifung Sīchung 12



ELECTIONS 2020



PARTY CONSTITUTION



Read dispatch

uh oh ive been too inactive, time to get it together.

I finished work on Aziria's judiciary. This is most likely a first draft of a first draft, since I know diddlysquat about law. As always, constructive criticism is welcome and encouraged!

Since the adaptation of the 1998 Constitution of the Republic, Aziria has been a unitary parliamentary republic

President


Incumbent:

Azhir Bariz (since 6 July 2019)
Style: The Honorable
Residence: Presidential Palace, Basril
Term length: Seven years (non-renewable)
Constituting instrument: Constitution of the Republic
Inaugural holder: TBA
Position created: 7 August 1998
Salary: 350,975 aziras annually

The President of the United Republic of Aziria, colloquially referred to as the President of Aziria, is the head of state of Aziria. The President is elected by the National Assembly. The office was formally established by the Constitution of the Republic in 1998, and is largely a ceremonial role.

Powers
The President is nominally the commander-in-chief of the Aziran Defense Forces, though these powers are de facto dependent on the National Assembly approving military action. In addition, they are tasked with appointing the Prime Minister elected by the National Assembly, and with appointing cabinet ministers on the Prime Ministerís advice. In addition, the President casts the tie-breaking vote if the National Assembly is tied. They also have the power of vetoing laws passed by the Assembly, but this power has never been used in the modern history of the presidency.

Although the Aziran Constitution gives the president extensive powers, presidents have largely taken on a ceremonial role, with the Prime Minister being seen as Aziriaís de facto chief executive. For example, although the president is constitutionally allowed to reject the prime minsters cabinet nominations and veto laws, these powers are rarely exercised.
Presidents can be removed from office by a two-thirds vote of the National Assembly.

Election
According to the Constitution of the Republic, the president is elected to a seven-year term by the National Assembly at least a month before the incumbentís term expires, or at most a week after the incumbent dies or is removed. Electing a president requires a supermajority of two-thirds of the Assembly. Elections are largely seen as ceremonial and nonpartisan, with the share of votes in favor of the candidate rarely below 80%.

History
Under Aziriaís 1961 constitution, Aziria was a presidential republic, in which the president was the head of state and head of government, and held sweeping executive powers. The office was abolished after the establishment of communist rule in the wake of the 1964 coup. The office was reestablished under the 1998 constitution, though as a largely ceremonial office with extensive reliance on the legislature.

Cabinet
The Cabinet of Aziria is the collective decision-making body of Aziria, composed of the Prime Minister and the Cabinet Ministers. Ministers are appointed by the President on the advice of the Prime Minister. The cabinet defines and directs Aziriaís general policy in accordance with its Constitution and laws. It meets at the House of Assembly in Basril, and meetings are chaired by the Prime Minister.

Formation of government
After elections, the President appoints the leader of the largest party in the National Assembly as Prime Minister and gives him the mandate to form a government, after which they nominate Cabinet Ministers, who are appointed by the President.

Current cabinet positions
Minister of Financial Affairs
Minister of Defense
Minister of Justice
Minister of Elections
Minister of Foreign Affairs
Minister of Health
Minister of Local Government
Minister of Human Rights
Minister of Development
Minister of Environmental Affairs

Prime Minister


Incumbent:

Zahra Tasihri (since 4 June 2019)
Style: The Honorable
Member of: National Assembly, Cabinet
Appointed by: President of Aziria
Term length: Up to ten years while commanding the confidence of the National Asssembly
Inaugural holder: TBA
Position created: 7 August 1998

The Prime Minister of the United Republic of Aziria, colloquially referred to as the Prime Minister of Aziria, is Aziriaís head of government and the leader of the Cabinet.

Election and appointment
After elections, the President appoints the leader of the largest party in the National Assembly as Prime Minister and gives him the mandate to form a government, after which they nominate Cabinet Ministers, who are appointed by the President.
According to the Constitution of the Republic, the president must appoint the leader of the political party with the most seats in the National Assembly as Prime Minister. If no party has an absolute majority in the Assembly, the presidentís candidate must be able to form a government within five days. If the candidate fails to do so, the party with the second largest number of seats must try, and so on. If neither can form a government, another election must be called.

Powers
In addition to the powers and privileges of a representative of the National Assembly, the prime minister recommends cabinet members and judges to the prime minister for appointment or dismissal. Like all members of the cabinet, the prime minister can be dismissed by the President, or by the National Assembly via a vote of no confidence. Despite officially just being an adviser to the president, the prime minister has increasingly taken on the role of many tasks officially reserved for the president, who is largely seen as a ceremonial figurehead.

National Assembly


Session: 5th National Assembly (since 4 June 2019)
Leadership: Prime Minister: Zahra Tasihri, PJF (since 4 June 2019)
Structure
Seats: 470
Government
Progressive Justice Front: 206
Green Party of Aziria: 32
Opposition
Aziran Democratic Party: 80
Liberty and Freedom: 67
Republican Peopleís Party: 42
Democratic Workers Party: 14
Western Alliance: 9
Christian Peopleís Party: 8
A New Aziria: 7
United for Justice: 2
Independent: 3
Elections
Voting system: Mixed-member proportional
Last election: 29 May 2019
Next election: On or before 29 May 2024
Meeting place: House of Assembly, Basril

The National Assembly is the legislative body of Aziria that was first elected in 1998 in accordance with the constitution passed that year. It is a unicameral body of 470 members, each elected through mixed-member proportional representation. The number of seats changes every five years, when a census is held, and the Assembly is reapportioned. Representatives can serve no more than ten years in office. The National Assembly convenes in the House of Assembly in Basril

History
The National Assembly was first created under Aziriaís 1961 Constitution after Aziriaís independence. It was composed of 100 members elected every three years, coinciding with the elections for President. Although the de jure government of Aziria, the Assembly had little actual power, which was largely concentrated in the executive and military. The Assembly was dissolved in 1964 after the overthrow of the Aziran Republic and the establishment of communist rule.

Following the conclusion of the Aziran Civil War in 1998, work began on the drafting of a new constitution. The Aziran Constitutional Convention convened in 1998 to undertake this matter. The constitution created by the ACC was approved by referendum on 7 February, and the first elections to the new National Assembly were held on 7 August.

Structure and powers
Under the 1998 Constitution of the Republic, the National Assembly is Aziriaís legislative body. Since the 2018 census, it has been made up of TBA representatives, half elected through first past the post in single-member districts, and half proportionally allocated. All representatives are elected at least every five years, and can serve no more than ten years in office as per the Term Limits Act 2010. Representatives must be at least 18 years old, and have been Aziran citizens for at least fifteen years.

In addition to proposing and passing legislation, the Assembly has a range of powers outlined in the Constitution of the Republic, including approving the national budget, dismissing the Prime Minister or President via motion of no confidence, confirming members of the judiciary and civil service nominated by the President on the Prime Ministerís advice, and authorizing military action on the Presidentís request. The Assembly is led by a Prime Minister, who is appointed by the President.

Electoral system
Representatives are elected through mixed-member proportional representation, with half of the members being elected in single-member districts each containing roughly 25,000 voters, and half being elected through party-list proportional representation. Elections are held at least every five years, but can be called earlier by the President or Prime Minister.

Judiciary
The judiciary of Aziria is the system of courts that applies and interprets law in Aziria. It is fully independent of the legislative and executive as to prevent politicization. It is organized hierarchically, with the Constitutional Court and Court of Cassation being the highest-ranking courts in the country.

Administration
The Ministry of Justice is the national ministry responsible for matters related to the justice system, such as appointing judges and operating courts. It is the only cabinet ministry to have more than one head, with a five-member Judicial Council heading the ministry. There are more restrictions on the executiveís power over the ministry than others. For instance, the Minister of Justice must be a political independent, and cannot be dismissed on the Presidentís sole discretion like other cabinet members. The largest components of the Ministry of Justice are the Aziran Legal Association, a quasi-independent organization tasked with licensing legal practitioners and appointing judges, and the National Courts Administration, tasked with administering the national and local court systems.

Procedure
Aziria uses an inquisitorial, or non-adversarial system, where the court is actively involved in the investigation of the case, while the prosecution and defense aid in the procurement of evidence and establishing the facts of the case. Verdicts are usually very clear and concise, due to the heavily codified nature of Aziran law. All legal proceedings are constitutionally required to be open to the public, though courts are allowed to restrict this if it is deemed necessary.

Officials
The key positions in courts are inquisitors, the equivalent of judges, and lawyers. As most cases arenít brought to trial, notaries and judicial assistants have significant power, and are more numerous than inquisitors and lawyers

Juries have no part in the legal system.

Inquisitors
Inquisitors are nominated by the Aziran Legal Association and appointed by the Judicial Council, a quasi-independent component of the Ministry of Justice that is partially overseen by the government, and partially by accredited legal associations and law schools. All inquisitors must not belong to a political party and have a mastersí degree in law and at least seven years of legal experience. They are limited to a maximum term of ten years, but can be removed from office for professional misconduct or other crimes by a two-thirds vote in the National Assembly and four out of five members of the Judicial Council. Inquisitors select one or more Assistant Inquisitors to assist them. Assistant Inquisitors must be either graduates of or enrolled in a law school accredited by the Aziran Legal Association.

Lawyers
Lawyers are legal practitioners who provide representation to the prosecution and defense in court. Lawyers must be graduates of an accredited law school and a member of the Aziran Legal Association.

Notaries
Notaries handle non contentious private law matters such as legal advice, domestic affairs, and estate planning.

Judicial assistants
The legal equivalent of law clerks, judicial assistants assist inquisitors and assistant inquisitors in the writing of verdicts and conducting legal inquiries and research.

Courts
Aziran courts are divided into three tiers, prefectural, provincial, and national.

Prefectural courts are contingent with the prefectures of each province. Although each prefecture theoretically has its own court, the variation in the population by prefecture has led to many changes in order to maximize efficiency, such as one court overseeing several sparsely-populated prefectures, or a few overseeing different parts of a densely-populated one.

There are eight provincial courts, one for each province of Aziria. Both prefectural and provincial courts can have original jurisdiction. If a case is first brought to a prefectural court, a provincial court has appellate jurisdiction.

The national courts include four courts of appeals, and two supreme courts: the Court of Cassation and the Constitutional Court. The Court of Cassation is the final authority on all civil and criminal cases, and the Constitutional Court is the final authority on all administrative and constitutional cases, and scrutinizes laws passed by the National Assembly to ensure their constitutionality. Both consist of five to fifteen members appointed by the Ministry of Justice. Currently, the Constitutional Court has seven members, and the Court of Cassation has thirteen members.

Local government

Read factbook

Quick question.

https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachments/276069920901431318/650505750430351360/festivals-of-nepal-1280x720.png

What are these headwear things called in English?

Athara Magarat wrote:Quick question.

https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachments/276069920901431318/650505750430351360/festivals-of-nepal-1280x720.png

What are these headwear things called in English?

peacock hats

Athara Magarat wrote:Quick question.

https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachments/276069920901431318/650505750430351360/festivals-of-nepal-1280x720.png

What are these headwear things called in English?

War bonnet.

Agadar wrote:War bonnet.

But isn't that what the Native American thing is called?

Athara Magarat wrote:But isn't that what the Native American thing is called?

Do not question my google-fu, youngling.

Athara Magarat wrote:But isn't that what the Native American thing is called?

Headdress?

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-08-18/china-pla-military-still-need-the-humble-yak/11405070

Time to make this a thing in AM...

Ainslie wrote:Roendavar or rightful Roendavarian land, AM, I volunteer you to get this into ICland

Bold of you to assume this isn't already a thing in Roendavar

Is there a way to resize images in factbooks?

The Aziran Islands wrote:Is there a way to resize images in factbooks?

Sadly no, you have to do it in a image editor such as Imgur

The Aziran Islands wrote:Is there a way to resize images in factbooks?

No manual resizing, but an image inside a [sidebar] tag will be scaled down to fit within the sidebar if it is too large.

Doesn't do anything if it's too small though.

https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachments/276069920901431318/650666720696205313/73g4kv7apy141.png

Chandelier Men...

This was in 1948, the first time we established contact with Murica.

Going to continue writing two dispatches tomorrow and the RP

«12. . .22,27822,27922,28022,28122,28222,28322,284. . .22,29822,299»

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