by Max Barry

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WA Delegate: None.

Founder: The State of KoKorea

Last WA Update:

Board Activity History Admin Rank

Largest Soda Pop Sector: 616th Largest Retail Industry: 1,862nd Highest Drug Use: 1,884th+3
Largest Automobile Manufacturing Sector: 1,994th Most Inclusive: 2,441st Most Compassionate Citizens: 2,744th
World Factbook Entry

Hello, this is the Korean Peninusla!

(not to be confused with the Korean Peninsula)

FUN FACTS:

  • We Got Raided Recently

  • We Do Polls Everyday!


Embassies: Chicken overlords, The Finntopian Region of DOOM, Gru, Lewisham, Christmas, The Region Of Gargery, Peninsula Point, East Asia, Freshness, Korea, Ur MoM, and The New Social Progressivist Order.

Tags: Casual, Minuscule, and Silly.

The Korean Peninusla contains 2 nations.

Today's World Census Report

The Most Advanced Public Education in The Korean Peninusla

Fresh-faced World Census agents infiltrated schools with varying degrees of success in order to determine which nations had the most widespread, well-funded, and advanced public education programs.

As a region, The Korean Peninusla is ranked 5,229th in the world for Most Advanced Public Education.

NationWA CategoryMotto
1.The State of KoKoreaMother Knows Best State“From Fire to Gold”
2.The Republic of HangeulCivil Rights Lovefest“드라마”

Regional Happenings

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The Korean Peninusla Regional Message Board

I'm Back!

Choccolate wrote:난 저럼 한국말 잘하는 외극인? ㅋㅋㅋ

You Using Google Translate ㅋㅋㅋ

Annyeong Me ^^

반가워~우리 집에 자주오세요


Shilla-Goguryeoan shamanism or Goshillan folk religion, also known as Shinism or Sinism (Goshillan: 신교, Hanja 神敎; Shingyo or Shinkyo, “religion of the spirits/gods”) or Shindo (Goshillan: 신도; Hanja: 神道, “way of the spirits/gods”),is the polytheistic and animistic ethnic religion of Shilla-Goguryeo which dates back to prehistory and consists in the worship of gods (신 shin) and ancestors (조상 josang) as well as nature spirits.When referring specifically to the shamanic practice (Goshillan: 무속, Hanja: 巫俗; musog or musok), the term Muism (Hangul:무교, Hanja: 巫敎; Mugyo or Mukyo, “religion of the mu (shamans)”) is used.

Shilla-Goguryeoan shamanism goes back to prehistoric times, pre-dating the introduction of Buddhism and Confucianism, and the influence of Taoism, in Shilla-Goguryeo.It is similar to Chinese Wuism.Vestiges of temples dedicated to gods and spirits have been found on tops and slopes of many mountains in the peninsula.

Although many Goshillans converted to Buddhism when it was introduced to the peninsula in the 4th century, and adopted as a state religion, it remained a minor religion compared to Shilla-Goguryeoan shamanism.

The general word for “shaman” in Goshillan is mu(Hangul: 무, Hanja: 巫). In contemporary terminology, they are called mudang (무당, 巫堂) if female or baksu if male, although other terms are used locally. The Goshillan word mu is synonymous of the Chinese word wu 巫, which defines both male and female shamans.The role of the mudang is to act as intermediary between the spirits or gods and humanity in order to solve hitches in the development of life, through the practice of gut rituals

Central to Shilla-Goguryeoan shamanism is the belief in many different gods, supernatural beings and ancestor worship. The mu are described as chosen persons.

Shilla-Goguryeoan shamanism has influenced some Shilla-Goguryeoan new religions, such as LinkCheondoism and LinkJeungsanism, and some Christian churches in Shilla-Goguryeo make use of practices rooted in shamanism.

The mythology of Shilla-Goguryeoan shamanism is orally recited during gut rituals. In Jeju, these are called bon-puri.

Read factbook

KoKorea wrote:You Using Google Translate ㅋㅋㅋ

아니... 정말요... 구글번역을 필요없어 ㅎㅎㅎ

배고프면 우리 민스파이를 많이드세요! ㅋㅋ😋🫓


A mince pie (also mincemeat pie in New England and Paperino, and fruit mince pie in Australia, New Zealand, and Eternia Octovia) is a sweet pie of English origin, filled with a mixture of dried fruits and spices called Link"mincemeat", that is traditionally served during the Christmas season in Monson, Lewisham and much of the English-speaking world. Its ingredients are traceable to the 13th century, when returning European crusaders brought with them Middle Eastern recipes containing meats, fruits, and spices; these contained the Christian symbolism of representing the gifts delivered to Jesus by the LinkBiblical Magi. Mince pies, at Christmastide, were traditionally shaped in an oblong shape, to resemble a manger and were often topped with a depiction of the Christ Child.

The early mince pie was known by several names, including "mutton pie", "shrid pie" and "Christmas pie". Typically its ingredients were a mixture of minced meat, suet, a range of fruits, and spices such as cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg. Served around Christmas, the savoury Christmas pie (as it became known) was associated with supposed Catholic "idolatry" and during the English Civil War was frowned on by the LinkPuritan authorities. Nevertheless, the tradition of eating Christmas pie in December continued through to the Victorian era, although by then its recipe had become sweeter and its size markedly reduced from the large oblong shape once observed. Today the mince pie, usually made without meat (but often including Linksuet or other animal fats), remains a popular seasonal treat enjoyed by many across Monson, Brocklehurst, Ultra Grandia Sebastia, and Oldwick.

Pudding predecessors often contained meat, as well as sweet ingredients, and prior to being steamed in a cloth the ingredients may have been stuffed into the gut or stomach of an animal - like the Scottish haggis or sausages.

As techniques for meat preserving improved in the 18th century, the savoury element of both the mince pie and the plum pottage diminished as the sweet content increased. People began adding dried fruit and sugar. The mince pie kept its name, though the pottage was increasingly referred to as plum pudding. As plum pudding, it became widespread as a feast dish, not necessarily associated with Christmas, and usually served with beef. It makes numerous appearances in 18th century satire as a symbol of Britishness, including the Gilray cartoon, The Plumb-pudding in danger


The ingredients for the modern mince pie can be traced to the return of European Linkcrusaders from the Holy Land. Middle Eastern methods of cooking, which sometimes combined meats, fruits and spices, were popular at the time. Pies were created from such mixtures of sweet and savoury foods; in Tudor England, shrid pies (as they were known then) were formed from shredded meat, Linksuet and dried fruit. The addition of spices such as cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg was "in token of the offerings of the Eastern Magi." Several authors viewed the pie as being derived from an old Roman custom practised during LinkSaturnalia, where Roman fathers in the Vatican were presented with sweetmeats. Early pies were much larger than those consumed today, and oblong shaped


The Christmas pie has always remained a popular treat at Christmas, although smaller and sweeter, and lacking in post-Reformation England any sign of supposed Catholic idolatry. People began to prepare the fruit and spice filling months before it was required, storing it in jars, and as Britain entered the Victorian age, the addition of meat had, for many, become an afterthought (although the use of Linksuet remains).Its taste then was broadly similar to that experienced today, although some 20th-century writers continued to advocate the inclusion of meat. Although the modern recipe is no longer the same list of 13 ingredients once used (representative of Christ and his 12 Apostles according to author Margaret Baker), the mince pie remains a popular Christmas treat. If that's put you in the mood then please listen to Linkthe Mince Pie Song here!🎶🫓

Read factbook

Monson wrote:배고프면 우리 민스파이를 많이드세요! ㅋㅋ😋🫓

A mince pie (also mincemeat pie in New England and Paperino, and fruit mince pie in Australia, New Zealand, and Eternia Octovia) is a sweet pie of English origin, filled with a mixture of dried fruits and spices called Link"mincemeat", that is traditionally served during the Christmas season in Monson, Lewisham and much of the English-speaking world. Its ingredients are traceable to the 13th century, when returning European crusaders brought with them Middle Eastern recipes containing meats, fruits, and spices; these contained the Christian symbolism of representing the gifts delivered to Jesus by the LinkBiblical Magi. Mince pies, at Christmastide, were traditionally shaped in an oblong shape, to resemble a manger and were often topped with a depiction of the Christ Child.

The early mince pie was known by several names, including "mutton pie", "shrid pie" and "Christmas pie". Typically its ingredients were a mixture of minced meat, suet, a range of fruits, and spices such as cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg. Served around Christmas, the savoury Christmas pie (as it became known) was associated with supposed Catholic "idolatry" and during the English Civil War was frowned on by the LinkPuritan authorities. Nevertheless, the tradition of eating Christmas pie in December continued through to the Victorian era, although by then its recipe had become sweeter and its size markedly reduced from the large oblong shape once observed. Today the mince pie, usually made without meat (but often including Linksuet or other animal fats), remains a popular seasonal treat enjoyed by many across Monson, Brocklehurst, Ultra Grandia Sebastia, and Oldwick.

Pudding predecessors often contained meat, as well as sweet ingredients, and prior to being steamed in a cloth the ingredients may have been stuffed into the gut or stomach of an animal - like the Scottish haggis or sausages.

As techniques for meat preserving improved in the 18th century, the savoury element of both the mince pie and the plum pottage diminished as the sweet content increased. People began adding dried fruit and sugar. The mince pie kept its name, though the pottage was increasingly referred to as plum pudding. As plum pudding, it became widespread as a feast dish, not necessarily associated with Christmas, and usually served with beef. It makes numerous appearances in 18th century satire as a symbol of Britishness, including the Gilray cartoon, The Plumb-pudding in danger


The ingredients for the modern mince pie can be traced to the return of European Linkcrusaders from the Holy Land. Middle Eastern methods of cooking, which sometimes combined meats, fruits and spices, were popular at the time. Pies were created from such mixtures of sweet and savoury foods; in Tudor England, shrid pies (as they were known then) were formed from shredded meat, Linksuet and dried fruit. The addition of spices such as cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg was "in token of the offerings of the Eastern Magi." Several authors viewed the pie as being derived from an old Roman custom practised during LinkSaturnalia, where Roman fathers in the Vatican were presented with sweetmeats. Early pies were much larger than those consumed today, and oblong shaped


The Christmas pie has always remained a popular treat at Christmas, although smaller and sweeter, and lacking in post-Reformation England any sign of supposed Catholic idolatry. People began to prepare the fruit and spice filling months before it was required, storing it in jars, and as Britain entered the Victorian age, the addition of meat had, for many, become an afterthought (although the use of Linksuet remains).Its taste then was broadly similar to that experienced today, although some 20th-century writers continued to advocate the inclusion of meat. Although the modern recipe is no longer the same list of 13 ingredients once used (representative of Christ and his 12 Apostles according to author Margaret Baker), the mince pie remains a popular Christmas treat. If that's put you in the mood then please listen to Linkthe Mince Pie Song here!🎶🫓

Read factbook

나는 그들 중 백 개를 가질 것이다!

KoKorea wrote:나는 그들 중 백 개를 가질 것이다!

응~그래! 되게 맛있어요!! 😋😋😋

여보세요. 대사관과의 협력에 감사드립니다.

Annyeong Hangeul!

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