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«12. . .2,0402,0412,0422,0432,0442,0452,046. . .2,0512,052»

Upper Tyja Nepus wrote:
The time has almost come, ladies and gentlemen, when the Government must ask you — the electors of Great Britain — to renew its mandate. It is as a member of the Government that I stand before you this evening, and the task I have set myself is to review the many things which the Government has achieved since the last General Election, and to outline the path which we hope to follow in the future, when, as I am confident will be the case, you return us to office with an even greater parliamentary majority.
No one will deny that what we have been able to do in the past five years is especially striking in view of the crisis which we inherited from the previous Government. With wages and prices spiralling upwards; with a record trade deficit of hundreds of millions of pounds; and with the pound sterling afflicted by the evaporation of international confidence, the country was then on the brink of financial disaster and economic collapse.
But within a very short time of coming back into power the present Government had taken steps to stabilise the position. No doubt you will remember some of those steps. Many of them were painful at the time.

Where is this from? I can't put my finger on it.

Today in History wrote:
On 4 May 1994, in a groan-inducing moment on the floor of U.K. Parliament, a lawmaker uses a pun that will spawn its own holiday far, far away from the halls of government.

“May the 4th is an appropriate date for a defense debate. My researcher, who is a bit of a wit, said that it should be called ‘National Star Wars Day,’” said Harry Cohen, then a Member of Parliament from Leyton, an area of East London. “He was talking about the film Star Wars rather than President Reagan's defense fantasy, and he added, ‘May the fourth be with you.’ That is a very bad joke; he deserves the sack for making it, but he is a good researcher.”

Cohen, of course, was referring to “May the Force be with you,” the guiding principle of the heroes in the wildly popular Star Wars movies, a franchise which was then just three films.

The pun (which may or may not have been original to Cohen’s staff) has been repeated countless times since, to the extent that 4 May is now recognized as Star Wars Day by Lucasfilm, Disney and fans around the world.

Fueled by memes and photos on the internet, fans began organizing “Star Wars Day” events in the 2010s—one of the first appears to have been at the Toronto Underground Cinema in 2011. Having acquired the rights to the Star Wars franchise in 2012, Disney began observing Star Wars Day the following year, with special events and releases marking the occasion.

2015 marked the first known celebration of Star Wars Day in space, when astronauts aboard the International Space Station watched Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith. Rather than limit their celebration to just one day, fans may choose to observe “Revenge of the Fifth” the day after Star Wars Day, although many hold that “Revenge of the Sixth” is a better pun.

May the Fourth be with you, FNR!

Boredom busting

My Nation wrote:Where is this from? I can't put my finger on it.

May the Fourth be with you, FNR!

And May the Fourth be with you as well

흔들어 주세요
Shake it Shake it Shake it Shake it baby
Shake it Shake it baby 밤새도록

5th May 1862 (160 years ago): Cinco de Mayo: Troops led by Ignacio Zaragoza halt a French invasion in the Battle of Puebla in Mexico

Cinco de Mayo (Spanish for "Fifth of May") is a yearly celebration held on 5 May, which commemorates the anniversary of Mexico's victory over the Second French Empire at the Battle of Puebla in 1862, led by General Ignacio Zaragoza. The victory of a smaller, poorly equipped Mexican force against the larger and better-armed French army was a morale boost for the Mexicans. Zaragoza died months after the battle from an illness, and a larger French force ultimately defeated the Mexican army at the Second Battle of Puebla and occupied Mexico City.

Cinco de Mayo has its roots in the Second French intervention in Mexico, which took place in the aftermath of the 1846–48 Mexican–American War and the 1858–61 Reform War. The Reform War was a civil war that pitted Liberals (who believed in separation of church and state and freedom of religion) against Conservatives (who favored a tight bond between the Catholic Church and the Mexican state). These wars nearly bankrupted the Mexican Treasury. On 17 July 1861, Mexican President Benito Juárez issued a moratorium in which all foreign debt payments would be suspended for two years. In response, France, Britain and Spain held a convention in London and joined in alliance to send naval forces to Veracruz to demand reimbursement. France, at the time ruled by Napoleon III, decided to use the opportunity to establish an empire in Mexico that would favor French interests, the Second Mexican Empire. Whereupon Britain and Spain negotiated with Mexico and peacefully withdrew. The empire was part of an envisioned "Latin America" (term used to imply cultural kinship of the region with France) that would rebuild French influence in the American continent and exclude Anglophone American territories.

Late in 1861, a well-armed French fleet attacked Veracruz, landing a large French force and driving President Juárez and his government into retreat. Moving on from Veracruz towards Mexico City, the French army encountered heavy resistance from the Mexicans close to Puebla, at the Mexican forts of Loreto and Guadalupe. The French army of 6,500–8,000 attacked the poorly equipped Mexican army of 4,000. On 5 May 1862, the Mexicans decisively defeated the French army. The victory represented a significant morale boost to the Mexican army and the Mexican people at large and helped establish a sense of national unity and patriotism.

The Mexican victory, however, was short-lived. A year later, with 30,000 troops, the French were able to defeat the Mexican army, capture Mexico City, and install Emperor Maximilian I as ruler of Mexico. The French victory was itself short-lived, lasting only three years, from 1864 to 1867. By 1865, "with the American Civil War now over, the U.S. began to provide more political and military assistance to Mexico to expel the French". Upon the conclusion of the American Civil War, Napoleon III, facing a persistent Mexican guerilla resistance, the threat of war with Prussia, and "the prospect of a serious scrap with the United States", retreated from Mexico starting in 1866. The Mexicans recaptured Mexico City, and Maximilian I was apprehended and executed, along with his Mexican generals Miguel Miramón and Tomás Mejía Camacho in Cerro de las Campanas, Querétaro. "On June 5, 1867, Benito Juárez entered Mexico City where he installed a new government organizing his administration."

More popular in the United States than Mexico, Cinco de Mayo has become associated with the celebration of Mexican-American culture. Celebrations began in California, where they have been observed annually since 1863. The day gained nationwide popularity beyond those of Mexican-American heritage in the 1980s due to advertising campaigns by beer, wine, and tequila companies; today, Cinco de Mayo generates beer sales on par with the Super Bowl. In Mexico, the commemoration of the battle continues to be mostly ceremonial, such as through military parades or battle reenactments. The city of Puebla marks the event with various festivals and reenactments of the battle.

Cinco de Mayo is sometimes mistaken for Mexico's Independence Day—the most important national holiday in Mexico—which is celebrated on 16 September, commemorating the Cry of Dolores in 1810, which initiated the war of Mexican independence from Spain. Cinco de Mayo has been referenced and featured in entertainment media, and has become an increasingly global celebration of Mexican culture, cuisine, and heritage.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c0/Batalla_de_Puebla.png

Battle of Puebla.
__________

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fa/Cinco_de_Mayo%2C_1901_poster.jpg

"May 5, 1862 and the siege of Puebla", a 1901 image from the Biblioteca del Niño Mexicano, a series of booklets for children detailing the history of Mexico.
__________

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/02/Cinco_de_Mayo_dancers_in_Washington_DC.jpg

Cinco de Mayo dancers in Washington DC.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinco_de_Mayo

6th May 1937 (85 years ago): The Hindenburg disaster

The airship Hindenburg, the largest dirigible ever built and the pride of Nazi Germany, bursts into flames upon touching its mooring mast in Lakehurst, New Jersey, killing 36 passengers and crew-members, on 6 May 1937.

Frenchman Henri Giffard constructed the first successful airship in 1852. His hydrogen-filled blimp carried a three-horsepower steam engine that turned a large propeller and flew at a speed of six miles per hour. The rigid airship, often known as the “zeppelin” after the last name of its innovator, Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin, was developed by the Germans in the late 19th century. Unlike French airships, the German ships had a light framework of metal girders that protected a gas-filled interior. However, like Giffard’s airship, they were lifted by highly flammable hydrogen gas and vulnerable to explosion. Large enough to carry substantial numbers of passengers, one of the most famous rigid airships was the Graf Zeppelin, a dirigible that traveled around the world in 1929. In the 1930s, the Graf Zeppelin pioneered the first transatlantic air service, leading to the construction of the Hindenburg, a larger passenger airship.

On 3 May 1937, the Hindenburg left Frankfurt, Germany, for a journey across the Atlantic to Lakehurst’s Navy Air Base. Stretching 245 meters from stern to bow, it carried 36 passengers and crew of 61. While attempting to moor at Lakehurst, the airship suddenly burst into flames, probably after a spark ignited its hydrogen core. Rapidly falling 60 meters to the ground, the hull of the airship incinerated within seconds. Thirteen passengers, 21 crewmen, and 1 civilian member of the ground crew lost their lives, and most of the survivors suffered substantial injuries.

Radio announcer Herb Morrison, who came to Lakehurst to record a routine voice-over for an NBC newsreel, immortalized the Hindenberg disaster in a famous on-the-scene description in which he emotionally declared, “Oh, the humanity!” The recording of Morrison’s commentary was immediately flown to New York, where it was aired as part of America’s first coast-to-coast radio news broadcast. Lighter-than-air passenger travel rapidly fell out of favor after the Hindenberg disaster, and no rigid airships survived World War II.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/1c/Hindenburg_disaster.jpg

Photograph of the Hindenburg descending in flames.
__________

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/94/Hindenburg_over_New_York_1937.jpg

The Hindenburg over Manhattan, New York on 6 May 1937, shortly before the disaster.
__________

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/56/Hindenburg_disaster%2C_1937.jpg

The fire bursts out of the nose of the Hindenburg, photographed by Murray Becker.

https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/the-hindenburg-disaster

Boredom busting

Hey give me a number 1-100

Boredom busting wrote:Hey give me a number 1-100

hehehe

Boredom busting wrote:Hey give me a number 1-100

No

Thank you for admitting me into the region, I look forward to taking part in the community, and in the RP.

Acyria wrote:OOC:

Thank you for admitting me into the region, I look forward to taking part in the community, and in the RP.

Wrong region

You will now be terminated via PK fire.
PK-
*Shulk comes out of nowhere yeets Ness away*

Soap tips wrote:Wrong region

You will now be terminated via PK fire.
PK-
*Shulk comes out of nowhere yeets Ness away*

Yeah the OOC was not needed here.

Perhaps it was not a good idea to post a BTS dislike comment in a Kpop subreddit

Boredom busting wrote:Hey give me a number 1-100

69

Jumpin Jack Flash, it's a gas
Jumpin Jack Flash, it's a gas
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Jumpin Jack Flash, it's a gas
Jumpin Jack Flash, it's a gas
Jumpin Jack Flash, it's a gas
Jumpin Jack Flash, it's a gas

Obets wrote: snippy snippy

Gassssssss

7th May 1794 (228 years ago): French Revolution: Robespierre introduces the Cult of the Supreme Being in the National Convention as the new state religion of the French First Republic

The Cult of the Supreme Being (French: Culte de l'Être suprême) was a form of deism established in France by Maximilien Robespierre during the French Revolution. It was intended to become the state religion of the new French Republic and a replacement for Roman Catholicism and its rival, the Cult of Reason.

The French Revolution had occasioned many radical changes in France, but one of the most fundamental for the hitherto Catholic nation was the official rejection of religion. The first new major organized school of thought emerged under the umbrella name of the Cult of Reason. Advocated by radicals like Jacques Hébert and Antoine-François Momoro, the Cult of Reason distilled a mixture of largely atheistic views into an anthropocentric philosophy. No gods at all were worshipped in the Cult of Reason—the guiding principle was devotion to the abstract concept of Reason itself.

This rejection of all godhead appalled Maximilien Robespierre. Though he was no admirer of Catholicism, he had a special dislike for atheism. He thought that belief in a supreme being was important for social order, and he liked to quote Voltaire: "If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him". To him, the Cult of Reason's philosophical offenses were compounded by the "scandalous scenes" and "wild masquerades" attributed to its practice. In late 1793, Robespierre delivered a fiery denunciation of the Cult of Reason and of its proponents and proceeded to give his own vision of proper Revolutionary religion. Devised almost entirely by Robespierre, the Cult of the Supreme Being was authorized by the National Convention on 7 May 1794 as the civic religion of France.

Robespierre believed that reason is only a means to an end, and the singular end is virtue. He sought to move beyond simple deism (often described as Voltairean by its adherents) to a new and, in his view, more rational devotion to the godhead. The primary principles of the Cult of the Supreme Being were a belief in the existence of a god and the immortality of the human soul. Though not inconsistent with Christian doctrine, these beliefs were put to the service of Robespierre's fuller meaning, which was of a type of civic-minded, public virtue he attributed to the Greeks and Romans. This type of virtue could only be attained through active fidelity to liberty and democracy. Belief in a living god and a higher moral code, he said, were "constant reminders of justice" and thus essential to a republican society.

On 7 May 1794, the National Convention established the Worship of the Supreme Being; the opening clauses of the Decree Establishing the Worship of the Supreme Being of the 18th Floréal of the Year II declared:

• The French People recognize the existence of the Supreme Being and the Immortality of the Soul.

• They declare that the best service of the Supreme Being is the practice of the man's duties.

• They set among the most important of these duties the detestation of bad faith and tyranny, by punishing tyrants and traitors, by caring for the unfortunate, respecting the weak, defending the oppressed, doing unto others all the good one can, and not being unjust towards anyone.

Robespierre used the religious issue to publicly denounce the motives of many radicals not in his camp, and it led, directly or indirectly, to the executions of Revolutionary de-Christianisers like Hébert, Momoro, and Anacharsis Cloots. The establishment of the Cult of the Supreme Being represented the beginning of the reversal of the wholesale de-Christianization process that had been looked upon previously with official favour. Simultaneously it marked the apogee of Robespierre's power. Though in theory he was just an equal member of the Committee of Public Safety, Robespierre at this point possessed an unrivalled national prominence.

The Cult of the Supreme Being and its festival may have contributed to the Thermidorian Reaction and the downfall of Robespierre. With his death at the guillotine on 28 July 1794, the cult lost all official sanction and disappeared from public view. It was officially banned by Napoleon Bonaparte on 8 April 1802 with his Law on Cults of 18 Germinal, Year X.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/01/Le_peuple_fran%C3%A7ais_reconna%C3%AEt_l%27%C3%AAtre_supr%C3%AAme.jpg

"The French people recognize the Supreme Being and the immortality of the soul" (1794 print).
__________

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/12/Hw-robespierre.jpg

Maximilien Robespierre (1758–1794).
__________

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/19/F%C3%AAte_de_l%27Etre_supr%C3%AAme_2.jpg

"The Festival of the Supreme Being", by Pierre-Antoine Demachy (1794).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cult_of_the_Supreme_Being

Tell me why are we so blind to see,
That the ones we hurt are you and me

Stravonia wrote:Tell me why are we so blind to see,
That the ones we hurt are you and me

You're the only one, one world, one love
But the battle goes on, Shadows of Mass Destruction

Soap tips wrote:You're the only one, one world, one love
But the battle goes on, Shadows of Mass Destruction

Standing here I realize
You are just like me
Trying to make history

Stravonia wrote:Standing here I realize
You are just like me
Trying to make history

夢が重なる
歌が生まれる
新しいステージへ
ENSEMBLE STARS!! GO!!

8th May 1945 (77 years ago): Victory in Europe Day

On 8 May, 1945, both Great Britain and the United States celebrate Victory in Europe Day. Cities in both nations, as well as formerly occupied cities in Western Europe, put out flags and banners, rejoicing in the defeat of the Nazi war machine during World War II.

Adolf Hitler, the Nazi leader, had committed suicide on 30 April during the Battle of Berlin and Germany's surrender was authorised by his successor, Reichspräsident Karl Dönitz. The administration headed by Dönitz was known as the Flensburg Government.

The act of military surrender was first signed at 02:41 on 7 May in the Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force at Reims, and a slightly modified document, considered the definitive German Instrument of Surrender, was signed on 8 May 1945 in Karlshorst, Berlin at 21:20 local time.

"The German High Command will at once issue orders to all German military, naval and air authorities and to all forces under German control to cease active operations at 23.01 hours Central European time on 8 May 1945..."
— German Instrument of Surrender, Article 2

The main concern of many German soldiers was to elude the grasp of Soviet forces, to keep from being taken prisoner. About 1 million Germans attempted a mass exodus to the West when the fighting in Czechoslovakia ended, but were stopped by the Soviets and taken captive. The Soviets took approximately 2 million prisoners in the period just before and after the German surrender.

Meanwhile, more than 13,000 British POWs were released and sent back to Great Britain.

Upon the defeat of Germany, celebrations erupted throughout the western world, especially in the UK and North America. More than one million people celebrated in the streets throughout the UK to mark the end of the European part of the war. In London, crowds massed in Trafalgar Square and up the Mall to Buckingham Palace, where King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, accompanied by their daughters and Prime Minister Winston Churchill, appeared on the balcony of the palace before the cheering crowds. Churchill went from the palace to Whitehall where he addressed another large crowd:

"God bless you all. This is your victory. In our long history, we have never seen a greater day than this. Everyone, man or woman, has done their best."

At this point he asked Ernest Bevin to come forward and share the applause. Bevin said: "No, Winston, this is your day", and proceeded to conduct the people in the singing of For He's a Jolly Good Fellow. Later, Princess Elizabeth (the future Queen Elizabeth II) and her sister Princess Margaret were allowed to wander incognito among the crowds and take part in the celebrations.

In the United States, the event coincided with President Harry Truman's 61st birthday. He dedicated the victory to the memory of his predecessor, Franklin D. Roosevelt, who had died of a cerebral hemorrhage less than a month earlier, on 12 April. Flags remained at half-staff for the remainder of the 30-day mourning period. Truman said of dedicating the victory to Roosevelt's memory and keeping the flags at half-staff that his only wish was "that Franklin D. Roosevelt had lived to witness this day". Later that day, Truman said that the victory made it his most enjoyable birthday. Great celebrations took place in many American cities, especially in New York's Times Square.

Tempering the jubilation somewhat, both Churchill and Truman pointed out that the war against Japan had not yet been won. In his radio broadcast at 15:00 on 8 May, Churchill told the British people that: "We may allow ourselves a brief period of rejoicing (as Japan) remains unsubdued". In America, Truman broadcast at 09:00 and said it was "a victory only half won".

Pockets of German-Soviet confrontation would continue into the next day. On 9 May, the Soviets would lose 600 more soldiers in Silesia before the Germans finally surrendered.

Consequently, V-E Day was not celebrated until the ninth in Moscow, with a radio broadcast salute from Stalin himself: “The age-long struggle of the Slav nations… has ended in victory. Your courage has defeated the Nazis. The war is over.”

Several countries observe public holidays on the day each year, also called Victory Over Fascism Day, Liberation Day or Victory Day. In the UK it is often abbreviated to VE Day, or V-E Day in the US, a term which existed as early as September 1944, in anticipation of victory.

Several former Soviet bloc countries including Russia, Belarus and Serbia celebrate on 9 May as the end of all combat actions was specified at 23:01 Central European Time, which was already 9 May in the Soviet Union. Israel also marks VE Day on 9 May, as a result of the large number of immigrants from the former Soviet bloc, but it is not a public holiday.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/43/Field_Marshall_Keitel_signs_German_surrender_terms_in_Berlin_8_May_1945_-_Restoration.jpg/2560px-Field_Marshall_Keitel_signs_German_surrender_terms_in_Berlin_8_May_1945_-_Restoration.jpg

Field Marshal Wilhelm Keitel signing the final surrender terms on 8 May 1945 in Berlin.
__________

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f5/Second_world_war_europe_1943-1945_map_en.png

Axis-held territory at the end of the war in Europe shown in blue.
__________

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/51/Winston_Churchill_waves_to_crowds_in_Whitehall_in_London_as_they_celebrate_VE_Day%2C_8_May_1945._H41849.jpg

Winston Churchill waving to the crowds from Whitehall on 8 May celebrating the end of the war, showing the V of Victory.
__________

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a0/4_US_MPs_reading_about_German_surrender_army.mil-2007-05-07-132957.jpg

United States military policemen reading about the German surrender in the newspaper "Stars and Stripes".
__________

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fc/%D0%9F%D0%B0%D1%80%D0%B0%D0%B4_%D0%B2_%D1%87%D0%B5%D1%81%D1%82%D1%8C_70-%D0%BB%D0%B5%D1%82%D0%B8%D1%8F_%D0%92%D0%B5%D0%BB%D0%B8%D0%BA%D0%BE%D0%B9_%D0%9F%D0%BE%D0%B1%D0%B5%D0%B4%D1%8B_-_19.jpg

The Victory Day Parade, Red Square, Moscow, Russia (Victory Day 2015).
__________

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9e/The_75th_Anniversary_of_Victory_in_Europe_Day_%2849882960996%29.jpg

Ceremony at the World War II Memorial, Washington D.C., United States (2020).

https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/victory-in-europe

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victory_in_Europe_Day

Boredom busting

Obets wrote:hehehe

HEHEHEHEHEHEHEHEHEHEHE

9th May 1914 (108 years ago): Woodrow Wilson proclaims the first Mother’s Day holiday

On 9 May 1914, President Woodrow Wilson issues a presidential proclamation that officially establishes the first national Mother’s Day holiday to celebrate America’s mothers.

The idea for a “Mother’s Day” is credited by some to Julia Ward Howe (1872) and by others to Anna Jarvis (1907), who both suggested a holiday dedicated to a day of peace. Many individual states celebrated Mother’s Day by 1911, but it was not until Wilson lobbied Congress in 1914 that Mother’s Day was officially set on the second Sunday of every May. In his first Mother’s Day proclamation, Wilson stated that the holiday offered a chance to “[publicly express] our love and reverence for the mothers of our country.”

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/44/Mother%27s_Day_cake.jpg

Mother's Day cookie cake.

https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/woodrow-wilson-proclaims-the-first-mothers-day-holiday

How is everyone today.

Stravonia wrote:How is everyone today.

Good, how about you?

«12. . .2,0402,0412,0422,0432,0442,0452,046. . .2,0512,052»

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