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Free Press wrote:I've been busy on other games and IRL. So I might be able to send you some interview questions tomorrow or the next day.

It is truly an honor to have such an esteemed personage in Save Our Planet. Take as much time as you desire. Enjoy your visit. While you sojourn here, you may wish to read the articles previously posted here on the RMB, or just peruse the bulletins on our WFE.

William Beebe wrote:It is truly an honor to have such an esteemed personage in Save Our Planet. Take as much time as you desire. Enjoy your visit. While you sojourn here, you may wish to read the articles previously posted here on the RMB, or just peruse the bulletins on our WFE.

Thank you, it will be my pleasure.

Five Suggested Ways to Encourage a Green Recovery after The Pandemic:

  1. Better buildings

  2. Better access to healthy food

  3. Smart mobility

  4. Green our neighbourhoods and cities

  5. More resilient infrastructures

https://theconversation.com/five-ways-to-kickstart-a-green-recovery-141115

Free Press wrote:Thank you, it will be my pleasure.

The pleasure is all mine!
In answer to the questions you submitted by telegram, please allow me to respond here on the RMB, as other nations may also have the same inquires.

I have a few questions on your region:
1. How many nations did this region once have?
This is a newly founded Region and as such, still has only the founder as a permanent resident. A recruiting effort may be organized in the future, but currently we are relying upon word of mouth to inform other potential residents of our existence.

2. What has urged you to create this region?
The Bulletin

The Pale Blue Dot

by The bear called smokey

Reproduced for Educational Purposes from LinkBusiness Insider Magazine

On Feb. 14, 1990, famed scientist Carl Sagan gave us an incredible perspective on our home planet that had never been seen before.

As NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft was about to leave our Solar System in 1989, Sagan, who was a member of the mission's imaging team, pleaded with officials to turn the camera around to take one last look back at Earth before the spaceship left our solar system.

The resulting image, with the Earth as a speck less than 0.12 pixels in size, became known as "the pale blue dot."

Astronauts had already taken plenty of beautiful photos of our planet at that point, and this grainy, low-resolution snapshot was not one of them.

But instead of beauty, this one-of-a-kind picture showed the immeasurable vastness of space, and our undeniably-small place within it.

"Everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives," Sagan later wrote. "On a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam."

"I was struck by how special Earth was, as I saw it shining in a ray of sunlight," said Candy Hansen, a planetary scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory who worked on the Voyager imaging team. "It also made me think about how vulnerable our tiny planet is."

Voyager 1 had already finished its primary mission of studying Jupiter and Saturn towards the end of 1980, but its mission was extended — and continues to this day — so it could study the far reaches of interstellar space.

First launched in 1977, the robotic spacecraft had already captured incredible images of planets within the Solar System, and eventually, researchers needed to disable its camera so it would have the power it needed to keep transmitting back to NASA once it left.

The striking photograph almost never happened. Early on in Voyager's mission, Sagan had tried to get the look back at Earth, but others on the team worried that the Sun would end up frying the camera. But eventually, with the mission winding down, Sagan finally got his wish — a last minute Valentine's Day gift in 1990.

"You know, I still get chills down my back," NASA researcher Candice Hansen-Koharcheck told NPR. "Because here was our planet, bathed in this ray of light, and it just looked incredibly special."

Voyager 1 took a series of "family portraits" from nearly 4 billion miles away, before its camera was turned off for good. The spacecraft is now the most-distant human-made object in space at roughly 12 billion miles away, and it takes about 17 hours for it to transmit data back to Earth.

Sagan would later write about the photograph — and the deeper meaning he gleaned from it — in his 1994 book, "Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space."
Here's what he wrote:

"From this distant vantage point, the Earth might not seem of any particular interest. But for us, it's different. Consider again that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us.

On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives.

The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every 'superstar,' every 'supreme leader,' every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that in glory and triumph they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner.

How frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the universe, are challenged by this point of pale light.

Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark.
In our obscurity – in all this vastness – there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known, so far, to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate.

Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment, the Earth is where we make our stand. It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world.

To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known."

Read dispatch

The Pale Blue Dot inspired the creation of this region. It has been posted in our WFE for the inspiration of other nations.

3. Anything else you would like to add?
This is a neutral region and will neither act as a Defender, nor as a Raider. Any nation with a love for our Planet is welcome!

my article so far

Save Our Planet; A Region

June 25th, 2020: I have traveled from the welcoming and corrupt lands of RPing (the CCD) into a real life activist hub. Well, maybe not a hub. Me and one other nation, William Beebe, are the only current inhabitants. This region, as you may have guessed, is focused on promoting pro environmental practices. This chivalrous deed is carried out by William Beebe (the namesake a real life naturalist if I'm not mistaken). The RMB here is made up mostly of my host posting fun (or worrying) facts and suggestions of what to do to lead a greener life. An example:

------------------------------------------------------
Five Suggested Ways to Encourage a Green Recovery after The Pandemic:

Better buildings

Better access to healthy food

Smart mobility

Green our neighbourhoods and cities

More resilient infrastructures

https://theconversation.com/five-ways-to-kickstart-a-green-recovery-141115
-------------------------------------------------------

The region recognizes that this is an online game, but strives to raise awareness on the things threatening our planet. I sent some questions to my host and am waiting for a response, one I should probably get tomorrow.

June 28th, 2020: I was busy with my other nations and didn't have the time to write this on the 26th. So I got a response to my questions. The region has hit its max population, 2. The pale blue dot was the inspiration for this region. And the founder wanted to make it clear that the regions completely neutral and "neither act as a Defender, nor as a Raider. Any nation with a love for our Planet is welcome".

Conclusion: Well its certainly an interesting region (if it can be called that). It's RMB is like a bulletin for environmental news, leading me to believe that this region will only thrive through embassies. But I urge you, if you care about our world, to create a puppet and send it to Save Our Planet to help William Beebe in his quest to create a better Earth on an satire internet nation game

The Pale Blue Dot: page=dispatch/id=1361320
I write this completely out of character and as an inhabitant of our Earth. After reading this dispatch I was deeply moved at our place in the universe. How civilizations rise and fall, of no consequence to things out side our small petty planet. I think we should all be extremely grateful to Carl Sagan (the astronomer) who asked that the photo be taken just before Voyager 1 left the solar system. It shows how small our world is, and how much smaller our lives are. But since we seem to be the only life in the universe so far I think that we are much bigger. We may not affect much, but we are an example. Life, and the human race, is cruel and selfish. But also beautiful and compassionate. We are genius and utterly stupid. We cannot be expressed in algorithms or any theories. Life may kill itself in the end, but it will be an infinitely more exciting and wild ride than even the biggest supernova. So I urge you, as people, to ask yourself this:

What the hell am I doing on this pale, blue, and wonderfully strange dot?

Read dispatch

Even past destruction to the environment by ill conceived infrastructure projects will heal over time. In Venezuela an abandoned tunneling project became a natural water reservoir.

    Venezuela’s economic collapse has left most homes without reliable running water, so Caracas resident Iraima Moscoso saw water pooling inside an abandoned construction site as the end of suffering for thousands of her poor neighbors.

    Workers had long ago stopped building a nearby highway tunnel through the mountain above them. Yet, spring water continued to collect inside the viaduct and then stream past their homes, wasted. The construction firm had also left behind coils of tube.

    Moscoso, 59, rallied her neighbors to salvage the materials and build their own system, tapping into the tunnel’s vast lagoon and running the waterline to their homes. Today, they’re free of the city’s crumbling service and enjoy what many in Venezuela consider a luxury.

https://apnews.com/a883de87f3cd5a5da370080cd3200012

Taiwan welcomes the new embassy with Save Our Planet!
We are honoured to establish diplomatic relations with you.
Your nations are always welcome to post on our RMB concerning any issues that affect our Earth.
Please let any of your fellow regions with the Eco-Friendly Tag know about us in turn.

San Te wrote:Taiwan welcomes the new embassy with Save Our Planet!
We are honoured to establish diplomatic relations with you.
Your nations are always welcome to post on our RMB concerning any issues that affect our Earth.
Please let any of your fellow regions with the Eco-Friendly Tag know about us in turn.

We are truly honored to have diplomatic relations with Taiwan. It is our hope that regions such as yours will contribute to discussions here on our Regional Message Board.

Lifestyles of the rich and famous are destroying our Planet:

    The facts are clear: the wealthiest 0.54%, about 40 million people, are responsible for 14% of lifestyle-related greenhouse gas emissions, while the bottom 50% of income earners, almost 4 billion people, only emit around 10%. The world’s top 10% income earners are responsible for at least 25% and up to 43% of our environmental impact.

https://theconversation.com/affluence-is-killing-the-planet-warn-scientists-141017

The obvious answer is that economic systems, which reward individual success with wealth and riches, actually harm the Earth. Thus, Capitalism must end!

Could Blockchain be used to encourage environmental responsibility?

    The world has failed to halt global warming. Four years after the signing of the Paris Agreement, most experts predict global warming will exceed the agreed thresholds, with disastrous consequences. As much as the world faces a climate crisis, it also faces a climate governance crisis: we know what must be done to halt climate change but we do not know yet how to get there.

    New mechanisms are evidently needed. Blockchain is one technology that has the potential to boost global cooperation for climate action.

See the following link:
https://theconversation.com/three-ways-blockchain-could-get-the-world-to-act-against-the-climate-crisis-139503

Australia takes steps to improve recycling:

    Australian Government to Create 10,000 New Jobs From the Recycling Fund.

    The Morrison government has announced it will create 10,000 new jobs and transform Australia’s waste and recycling industry.

    In a joint media release on July 6, the Minister for the Environment Sussan Ley and the Assistant Minister for Waste Reduction and Environmental Management Trevor Evans said the government would commit $190 million to create a new Recycling Modernisation Fund (RMF).

    The RMF will generate a billion-dollar transformation of Australia’s ability to recycle and process waste.

    “More than 10,000 jobs will be created, and over 10 million tonnes of waste diverted from landfill to the making of useful products as Australia turbocharges its recycling capacity,” said Ley and Evans in the joint statement.

    The federal government expects the new fund to generate $600 million of investment in the Australian recycling industry by supporting investment into new infrastructure “to sort, process and remanufacture materials such as mixed plastic, paper, tyres and glass,” said Ley and Evans.

    “This is a once in a generation opportunity to remodel waste management, reduce pressure on our environment and create economic opportunity,” said Ley.

    “We need to stop throwing away tonnes of electronic waste and batteries each year and develop new ways to recycle valuable resources.”

    The RMF is part of the Morrison government’s national strategy to change the way Australia deals with rubbish.

http://conservativeangle.com/australian-government-to-create-10000-new-jobs-from-recycling-fund/

Should this region conduct a telegraph recruitment campaign?
Please vote in the current poll.

An Environmental Victory Agsinst Pipeline Companies:

    Two U.S. energy companies announced Sunday they have canceled a planned natural gas pipeline project that faced opposition from landowners, activists and environmental advocates.

    Dominion Energy and Duke Energy said in a statement, “A series of legal challenges to the project's federal and state permits has caused significant project cost increases and timing delays.”

    The pipeline was meant to run from the state of West Virginia and carry natural gas to customers in neighboring Virginia and in North Carolina.

    The companies said it would both lower costs for consumers and allow the retirement of coal power plants.

    But opponents said the project would harm wildlife and the environment with construction leveling trees and some ridge tops, and with the pipeline going under the Appalachian Trail that is popular with hikers.

https://www.voanews.com/usa/us-energy-companies-end-atlantic-coast-pipeline-project

Poll Results
Based upon the recent poll results, a brief telegraphic recruiting campaign will be conducted to jump-start the regional membership.

Thank you to all the nations that took time to participate in the poll!

Welcome Arg lea phird! For the love of the Earth that you have shown by becoming our First Nation, you are hereby appointed First Environmentalist with power over our borders and our polls. Congratulations! Long may you serve!

Welcome to Sillia! Your experienced nation is greatly valued and will be a true asset to this region! Do you desire a position in our government?

Welcome to Blhee and Tomty gaming! We are very glad that you are here. Do any of the recent articles posted here inspire you?

Global Warming Is Affecting Human Health

    "We humans evolved to live in a particular range of temperatures, so it's clear that if we continue to cause temperatures to rise worldwide, sooner or later the hottest parts of the world could start to see conditions that are simply too hot for us."

    Another study, published earlier this year, warned that heat stress could affect as many as 1.2bn people around the world by 2100, four times more than now.

    According to Dr Jimmy Lee, "it's not rocket science".

    People need to drink plenty of fluid before they start work, take regular breaks and then drink again when they rest.

    His hospital has started laying on "slushie" semi-frozen drinks to help the staff cool down.

    But he admits that avoiding heat stress is easier said than done.

    For him and his colleagues, going for rests involves the laborious process of changing out of PPE and then back into a new set of equipment

    There's a practical problem as well - "some people do not want to drink so they can avoid having to go to the toilet," he says.

    And there's a professional desire to keep working whatever the difficulties so as not to let colleagues and patients down at a time of crisis.

    People who are highly motivated can actually be at the greatest risk of heat injury, says Dr Jason Lee, an associate professor in physiology at the National University of Singapore.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-53415298?intlink_from_url=https://www.bbc.com/news/topics/c4y3wxdx24nt/our-planet-matters&link_location=live-reporting-story

Please take care when working outdoors in the heat.

Hello from The Flying Spaghetti Monster Lands.
We love our embassies!

Korotania wrote:Hello from The Flying Spaghetti Monster Lands.
We love our embassies!

Greetings, Friends! It is a pleasure to have you posting here.

Welcome New Nation
Welcome to Yves Adele Harlow! We are always glad to welcome another nation which loves our planet Earth.

hello

Ancapstands wrote:hello

Welcome to the RMB! Are any of the previously posted articles of concern to you?

William Beebe wrote:Welcome to the RMB! Are any of the previously posted articles of concern to you?

Kinda

Humanity has had a common weakness that has lasted throughout its history; that is; it tries to avoid or ignore grand-scale, slowly-evolving catastrophes. During the Chernobyl accident, a failure to act quickly caused large swaths of Ukraine to remain uninhabitable to this day. The inability of the United Kingdom to act in protection of thousands of children from Thalidomide left families broken. Ministers, back then, failed to implement industrial restrictions in a timely way that would have saved, perhaps, hundreds of thousands from harm. One could go on with numerous examples where, historically, humanity has failed to act quickly enough to defer a calamity of epic proportions. Although a cyclical model of history is no way to begin scientific inquiry, it does not even approximate the reality of the vast and grave damage done thus far to our atmosphere.

The negligence of the energy sector is but a small cause that contributed to an ever expanding problem of global atmospheric pollution. Chemical and energy manufacturing sectors are the heaviest contributors toward global temperature increases.(1) It is incidental to the progress of civilization to innovate products at the cost of the environment. This attitude that the environment can bear the harms of current manufacturing structures is conjecture at best.

Currently, China leads the world in atmospheric pollutants. (2) It goes without saying that China is the leader of the world's manufacturing market.(3) There is a direct correlation between the level of manufacturing, and the level of energy consumption. As more is produced by a state's industrial infrastructure, the more energy is demanded as an input. With higher levels of manufacturing, higher levels of energy input are required creating an almost 2 factor pollution output.

The needs of every state can be seen ranked by its demand for energy.(4) Albeit in recent months of 2020 the percentage of change for energy demand has dropped due to the COVID-19 situation, the drop in energy demanded has seen a drop of CO2 emissions.(5) What other evidence do people need now?

The problems we have with controlling global climate change is not in the regulation of manufacturers (not singularly because they will put up a formidable public offense in legislatures) but of energy providers. We must insure further that the cost of manufacturer's energy expenses are not shed upon the consumer. Should the energy costs of manufacturers be displaced on the costs of their goods and upon the consumer, why regulate the industries at their (the consumer's) sole expense?

To model a legal framework of climate control that looks directly at energy producers is a necessary policy that must be introduced. However, this will not be done immediately. Like it was stated before. Humanity will look the other way for a while until this gets worse and humans can no longer sit in air conditioning without sweating.

(1) https://insideclimatenews.org/news/04082020/china-n2o-super-pollutant-nylon-emissions-climate-change
(2) https://www.ucsusa.org/resources/each-countrys-share-co2-emissions
(3) https://www.brookings.edu/research/global-manufacturing-scorecard-how-the-us-compares-to-18-other-nations/
(4) https://www.eia.gov/international/rankings/world?pa=12&u=0&f=A&v=none&y=01%2F01%2F2017
(5) https://www.iea.org/reports/global-energy-review-2020/global-energy-and-co2-emissions-in-2020#abstract

Demonos Ministry of Foreign Affairs wrote:Humanity has had a common weakness that has lasted throughout its history; that is; it tries to avoid or ignore grand-scale, slowly-evolving catastrophes. During the Chernobyl accident, a failure to act quickly caused large swaths of Ukraine to remain uninhabitable to this day. The inability of the United Kingdom to act in protection of thousands of children from Thalidomide left families broken. Ministers, back then, failed to implement industrial restrictions in a timely way that would have saved, perhaps, hundreds of thousands from harm. One could go on with numerous examples where, historically, humanity has failed to act quickly enough to defer a calamity of epic proportions. Although a cyclical model of history is no way to begin scientific inquiry, it does not even approximate the reality of the vast and grave damage done thus far to our atmosphere.

The negligence of the energy sector is but a small cause that contributed to an ever expanding problem of global atmospheric pollution. Chemical and energy manufacturing sectors are the heaviest contributors toward global temperature increases.(1) It is incidental to the progress of civilization to innovate products at the cost of the environment. This attitude that the environment can bear the harms of current manufacturing structures is conjecture at best.

Currently, China leads the world in atmospheric pollutants. (2) It goes without saying that China is the leader of the world's manufacturing market.(3) There is a direct correlation between the level of manufacturing, and the level of energy consumption. As more is produced by a state's industrial infrastructure, the more energy is demanded as an input. With higher levels of manufacturing, higher levels of energy input are required creating an almost 2 factor pollution output.

The needs of every state can be seen ranked by its demand for energy.(4) Albeit in recent months of 2020 the percentage of change for energy demand has dropped due to the COVID-19 situation, the drop in energy demanded has seen a drop of CO2 emissions.(5) What other evidence do people need now?

The problems we have with controlling global climate change is not in the regulation of manufacturers (not singularly because they will put up a formidable public offense in legislatures) but of energy providers. We must insure further that the cost of manufacturer's energy expenses are not shed upon the consumer. Should the energy costs of manufacturers be displaced on the costs of their goods and upon the consumer, why regulate the industries at their (the consumer's) sole expense?

To model a legal framework of climate control that looks directly at energy producers is a necessary policy that must be introduced. However, this will not be done immediately. Like it was stated before. Humanity will look the other way for a while until this gets worse and humans can no longer sit in air conditioning without sweating.

[spoiler=citations]
(1) https://insideclimatenews.org/news/04082020/china-n2o-super-pollutant-nylon-emissions-climate-change
(2) https://www.ucsusa.org/resources/each-countrys-share-co2-emissions
(3) https://www.brookings.edu/research/global-manufacturing-scorecard-how-the-us-compares-to-18-other-nations/
(4) https://www.eia.gov/international/rankings/world?pa=12&u=0&f=A&v=none&y=01%2F01%2F2017
(5) https://www.iea.org/reports/global-energy-review-2020/global-energy-and-co2-emissions-in-2020#abstract

I pray that humanity moves quickly this time!
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