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«12. . .86,17286,17386,17486,17586,17686,17786,178. . .86,82286,823»

Rutannia wrote:How you feeling about those citizens, we won’t give you a healthcare bill. Promise.

There are 1.18 Billion of us. We dont care about 7 or 12 people

Liberalina is takin WE WUZ KANGZ to a whole new level

MARCH, 1996
𝐌𝐀𝐊𝐄 𝐈𝐍 𝐁𝐎𝐊𝐎𝐑𝐎!
UPDATE - KOREAN INVESTMENTS
___

Following talks, numerous Korean companies will expand into Bokoro in a wide variety of sectors. The following companies will have their regional headquarters in Lagos..

- HYUNDAI, AUTOMOTIVE SECTOR.

- SAMSUNG, CONGLOMERATE.

- LG, CONGLOMERATE.

- KIA, AUTOMOTIVE SECTOR.

The following will set up manufacturing plants in Bokoro, which will produce some 150,000 to 250,000 cars depending on domestic and foreign demand.

- KIA, AUTOMOTIVE.

- HYUNDAI, AUTOMOTIVE SECTOR.

The deals are the first major foreign investment package of the "Make in Bokoro" program, all companies will receive their advantages including 5 years of no taxes, 10 years of free port trade and far more.
___

Rutannia

>:(

THE KINGDOM OF SUDAN: “A NATION HIDDEN IN THE SANDS”

    | In the late 1880s, the UK Enchanted Oasis began working towards occupying Sudan as a colony jointly ruled with Egypt. In these turbulent times, a religious leader named Muhammad Ahmad Al Mahdi claimed himself to be an Islamic saviour & gathered a huge army that managed to fend of the British Army for several years before his theocratic empire fell to British colonial rule. Even as his followers, known as the Order of Samaniyya, dispersed and went into hiding they were not eradicated...

Britain ruled Sudan as a colony from the 1890s up until 1956, leaving relatively little influence on the Sudanese due to their strong national identity and religious zeal for Islam. When nationalist protests in the early 50s led to the independence of British Sudan, the Order of Samaniyya seized the opportunity to regain power of Sudan & re-install the House of Al Mahdi, playing on anti-colonial sentiments to gain popular support. Sudanese nationalists who opted for the formation of a secular republic were sidelined or imprisoned.

    The Kingdom of Sudan was then formed with Muhammad Ahmad Al Mahdi’s son, Abdulrahman Al Mahdi being crowned King of Sudan. The passionate and fiercely nationalist king declared a “Back to Sudan” campaign which aimed to revert the country to its pre-colonial state. Western dress was banned in favour of Arab-Sudanese traditional robes, the use of European names were banned in favour of Arab names, the education & political system was modified to suit King Abdulrahman’s father’s interpretation of Islamic Shari’ah and an isolationist policy was implemented, banning Sudanese from leaving the country without special permission and strictly restricting foreign visits to the country except on business and diplomacy. Being an countering force to communism in the region, the Kingdom managed to gain backing from the US Paramountica in the form of financial & technical aid that allowed it to exploit it’s oil wealth, as well as economic aid from the EAF Antagarichh, a regional power bordering it. The Royal Family used this wealth to maintain free healthcare & education in the country, which helped silent dissenters (who were also taken by use of brutal force from the Secret Police).

In 1979, King Abdulrahman’s son, Sadiq Al Mahdi took over after his death and he has been ruling Sudan ever since. King Sadiq’s rule has been rumoured to be more moderate than his father’s. He has loosened restrictions on usage of foreign & modern technology by ordinary Sudanese citizens, making telephones, televisions and radios more widespread, as well as allowed Western educators to tutor members of the country’s wealthy political & military elite. Even so, the majority of the country’s population remains in poverty failing to benefit from the country’s oil wealth and with the country being hit by the African Financial Crisis of the mid-90s it is becoming harder and harder for the Al Mahdi Royal Family to sustain it’s corrupt and oppressive rule over it’s 35 million Sudanese subjects... |


-

This mysterious country has remained isolated since it’s independence from Britain (1956). The people here are Afro-Arabs who are pious & highly proud of their traditions, despite believing the rest of the world inferior they have used modern technologies & ideas to keep their country alive. This country is almost unheard on a global scale, yet the people here are in a constant state of struggle whilst working and engaging religious worship. The King rules over all, sees all and demands fear from all, the people seem to be tired of His Majesty but no one dares rising up against him. The few who gain entry to Sudan are truly blessed.

- Thomas Johnson, the only American journalist who was ever allowed entry into Sudan in 1979.


.



Sudan's history goes back to the Pharaonic period, witnessing the kingdom of Kerma (c. 2500 BC–1500 BC), the subsequent rule of the Egyptian New Kingdom (c. 1500 BC–1070 BC) and the rise of the kingdom of Kush (c. 785 BC–350 AD), which would in turn control Egypt itself for nearly a century.


Between the 14th and 15th centuries much of Sudan was settled by Arab nomads. From the 16th–19th centuries, central and eastern Sudan were dominated by the Funj sultanate, while Darfur ruled the west and the Ottomans the far north. This period saw extensive Islamization and Arabization.


From 1820 to 1874 the entirety of Sudan was conquered by the Muhammad Ali dynasty. Between 1881 and 1885 the harsh Egyptian reign was eventually met with a successful revolt led by the self-proclaimed Mahdi (Islamic saviour) Muhammad Ahmad known by some in the West as “Mad Mahdi”, resulting in the establishment of the Caliphate of Omdurman. This state was eventually destroyed in 1898 by the British, who would then govern Sudan together with Egypt.

After waves of nationalist protests began in the early 50s led by key activists such as Ismail Al Azhari, Sudan achieved independence from Britain in 1956. While some Sudanese nationalists wanted to form a secular republic, a Sudanese political group known as the Samaniyya Order, followers of Muhammad Ahmad Al Mahdi’s interpretation of Sufi Islam, played on anti-British sentiments and managed to revive the House of Al Mahdi, with Muhammad Ahmad Al Mahdi’s son, Abdulrahman Al Mahdi being named as the first king of the newly independent Kingdom of Sudan.

King Abdulrahman immediately formed a Royal Council filled with supporters of the Al Mahdi royal family and religious clergymen who favoured his father’s interpretation of Islam. King Abdulrahman then launched the “Return to Sudan” campaign which banned Western dress in favour of Sudanese Arab-style robes, ban of Western names in favour of Arab ones, Islamisation of the education system & daily life, as well as a policy of isolationism that limited foreign visits to the country & banned Sudanese from traveling abroad without special permission. With the Kingdom of Sudan being non-communist it received US financial aid during the Cold War & through exporting its oil, King Abdulrahman & the royal family grew wealthy, silencing dissent with brutal force from the secret police as well as free healthcare & education.

In 1979, King Abdulrahman died and his eldest son Sadiq Al Mahdi became king. King Sadiq relaxed some of the laws that came with his father’s “Back to Sudan” campaign loosening restrictions on the importation of foreign technologies & allowing for some modern infrastructure to be built in the capital. Western education was also made available for elites and a select few soldiers in the military.


Read factbook

The Confederate Prussian Empire wrote:Damon: That would probably be the best plan, as the sooner we get rolling with this case the sooner we can finish it. However, since there is three of us, I’ll leave it up to you two if you want to hop right into this, or just relax for a day. Because to tell both of you the truth, me having a bullet hole in me wants to see this sh*t through.

Bomoko

I want to dump Danish and Norweigan investments into Bokoro

Liberalina

OsivoII wrote:President Kajombo: “Well is there anyway the North could help in cultivating homogeny in the south?”

    President Machel: "I believe sending Swahili teachers to teach people in the Free Republic the language could not only cultivate use of a common language, but further solidify business potential between the nations on both sides of the Zambezi."

Victoria Harbor wrote:Destroy Ranponian

leme alone aussie! ;<;

The Confederate Prussian Empire wrote:Damon: That would probably be the best plan, as the sooner we get rolling with this case the sooner we can finish it. However, since there is three of us, I’ll leave it up to you two if you want to hop right into this, or just relax for a day. Because to tell both of you the truth, me having a bullet hole in me wants to see this sh*t through.

Chan: Yeah, let’s find this Law bastard and his Brotherhood and put the Naypidaw Gang to justice. The longer we wait-

Lay: -The more people will die. Let’s get a move on. Damon drive us to your HQ and we’ll give DC Hun a brief on our plans.

Antillian wrote:President Rashida
I’m glad to hear. Our nation was ajust starting to develop but this recession has slowed that process down significantly. We are working on a solution on the matter but I’m imagining you two have a plan

    First Citizen Barre: "Well, since the East African Federation has become the largest economy in Africa, I've been struggling to keep the Crisis as limited as possible, but unfortunately all of Africa has been affected harshly. However, domestically in the Federation I have been instituting socialist policies to prevent famine and encourage stock market stability and business growth while preventing monopolization."

    President Machel: "And as a Marxist-Leninist, I've essentially enacted policies much the same but a little more revolutionary than my Somali comrade. However, the effect has been the same- stability. We're hoping that the establishment of the Council of Africa will oversee the implementation of similar policies across the Continent which will not have just the effect of creating stability throughout the nations, but spreading revolutionary principles throughout Africa which will lead to a future where the countries of Africa can share a common market and, hopefully, begin the process of further unification as we pursue pan-Africanism."

Bomoko wrote:Chan: Yeah, let’s find this Law bastard and his Brotherhood and put the Naypidaw Gang to justice. The longer we wait-

Lay: -The more people will die. Let’s get a move on. Damon drive us to your HQ and we’ll give DC Hun a brief on our plans.

Damon: Alright, let’s move.

He would say as he stood left the house with them, making sure to lock up before driving to the police station with them.

Suuvla wrote:
    President Machel: "I believe sending Swahili teachers to teach people in the Free Republic the language could not only cultivate use of a common language, but further solidify business potential between the nations on both sides of the Zambezi."

Presidnet Kajombo: “Yes that would be very do able for us. I can try to send 100 teachers down to the south to teach younger and older people alike.”

OsivoII wrote:Presidnet Kajombo: “Yes that would be very do able for us. I can try to send 100 teachers down to the south to teach younger and older people alike.”

    President Machel: "This would be greatly appreciated, my friend. While East Africa has proven a valuable economic partner, sharing the benefits of language will help more than a few economists."

The Confederate Prussian Empire wrote:Damon: Alright, let’s move.

He would say as he stood left the house with them, making sure to lock up before driving to the police station with them.

As Damon drove through Vientiane he would see that numerous construction projects across the city were getting close to completion, huge building complexes and skyscrapers etc. Even so, as they drove the mood was contemplative. Lay, Damon & Chan would be thinking about how to go about finding Law.

Chan: ...Alright so maybe we should start by going to East Town, and questioning as many people as we can?

Lay: Yeah, but I’m worried we’ll be wasting our time with people scared to get killed off as informants.


-

This mysterious country has remained isolated since it’s independence from Britain (1956). The people here are Afro-Arabs who are pious & highly proud of their traditions, despite believing the rest of the world inferior they have used modern technologies & ideas to keep their country alive. This country is almost unheard on a global scale, yet the people here are in a constant state of struggle whilst working and engaging religious worship. The King rules over all, sees all and demands fear from all, the people seem to be tired of His Majesty but no one dares rising up against him. The few who gain entry to Sudan are truly blessed.

- Thomas Johnson, the only American journalist who was ever allowed entry into Sudan in 1979.


.



Sudan's history goes back to the Pharaonic period, witnessing the kingdom of Kerma (c. 2500 BC–1500 BC), the subsequent rule of the Egyptian New Kingdom (c. 1500 BC–1070 BC) and the rise of the kingdom of Kush (c. 785 BC–350 AD), which would in turn control Egypt itself for nearly a century.


Between the 14th and 15th centuries much of Sudan was settled by Arab nomads. From the 16th–19th centuries, central and eastern Sudan were dominated by the Funj sultanate, while Darfur ruled the west and the Ottomans the far north. This period saw extensive Islamization and Arabization.


From 1820 to 1874 the entirety of Sudan was conquered by the Muhammad Ali dynasty. Between 1881 and 1885 the harsh Egyptian reign was eventually met with a successful revolt led by the self-proclaimed Mahdi (Islamic saviour) Muhammad Ahmad known by some in the West as “Mad Mahdi”, resulting in the establishment of the Caliphate of Omdurman. This state was eventually destroyed in 1898 by the British, who would then govern Sudan together with Egypt.

After waves of nationalist protests began in the early 50s led by key activists such as Ismail Al Azhari, Sudan achieved independence from Britain in 1956. While some Sudanese nationalists wanted to form a secular republic, a Sudanese political group known as the Samaniyya Order, followers of Muhammad Ahmad Al Mahdi’s interpretation of Sufi Islam, played on anti-British sentiments and managed to revive the House of Al Mahdi, with Muhammad Ahmad Al Mahdi’s son, Abdulrahman Al Mahdi being named as the first king of the newly independent Kingdom of Sudan.

King Abdulrahman immediately formed a Royal Council filled with supporters of the Al Mahdi royal family and religious clergymen who favoured his father’s interpretation of Islam. King Abdulrahman then launched the “Return to Sudan” campaign which banned Western dress in favour of Sudanese Arab-style robes, ban of Western names in favour of Arab ones, Islamisation of the education system & daily life, as well as a policy of isolationism that limited foreign visits to the country & banned Sudanese from traveling abroad without special permission. With the Kingdom of Sudan being non-communist it received US financial aid during the Cold War & through exporting its oil, King Abdulrahman & the royal family grew wealthy, silencing dissent with brutal force from the secret police as well as free healthcare & education.

In 1979, King Abdulrahman died and his eldest son Sadiq Al Mahdi became king. King Sadiq relaxed some of the laws that came with his father’s “Back to Sudan” campaign loosening restrictions on the importation of foreign technologies & allowing for some modern infrastructure to be built in the capital. Western education was also made available for elites and a select few soldiers in the military.


Read factbook

Bomoko wrote:As Damon drove through Vientiane he would see that numerous construction projects across the city were getting close to completion, huge building complexes and skyscrapers etc. Even so, as they drove the mood was contemplative. Lay, Damon & Chan would be thinking about how to go about finding Law.

Chan: ...Alright so maybe we should start by going to East Town, and questioning as many people as we can?

Lay: Yeah, but I’m worried we’ll be wasting our time with people scared to get killed off as informants.

Damon: I believe that if we come across a crime scene like Chan and I did, which lead us to finding Tong Po, it may lead us in the right direction. There are criminal masterminds, yes, but those they employ are not always the smartest or most disciplined. When they mess up, we could be there just in the nick of time.

Today, 100 years ago, the Senate of the United States passed the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, sending it to the states for ratification.

Ah, the 1880’s :3

Those were the days ^<^

"Egyptians aren't Arabs - their Schizophrenic Black Africans" - Oba Nneka

Bomoko II Sudan wrote:

-

This mysterious country has remained isolated since it’s independence from Britain (1956). The people here are Afro-Arabs who are pious & highly proud of their traditions, despite believing the rest of the world inferior they have used modern technologies & ideas to keep their country alive. This country is almost unheard on a global scale, yet the people here are in a constant state of struggle whilst working and engaging religious worship. The King rules over all, sees all and demands fear from all, the people seem to be tired of His Majesty but no one dares rising up against him. The few who gain entry to Sudan are truly blessed.

- Thomas Johnson, the only American journalist who was ever allowed entry into Sudan in 1979.


.



Sudan's history goes back to the Pharaonic period, witnessing the kingdom of Kerma (c. 2500 BC–1500 BC), the subsequent rule of the Egyptian New Kingdom (c. 1500 BC–1070 BC) and the rise of the kingdom of Kush (c. 785 BC–350 AD), which would in turn control Egypt itself for nearly a century.


Between the 14th and 15th centuries much of Sudan was settled by Arab nomads. From the 16th–19th centuries, central and eastern Sudan were dominated by the Funj sultanate, while Darfur ruled the west and the Ottomans the far north. This period saw extensive Islamization and Arabization.


From 1820 to 1874 the entirety of Sudan was conquered by the Muhammad Ali dynasty. Between 1881 and 1885 the harsh Egyptian reign was eventually met with a successful revolt led by the self-proclaimed Mahdi (Islamic saviour) Muhammad Ahmad known by some in the West as “Mad Mahdi”, resulting in the establishment of the Caliphate of Omdurman. This state was eventually destroyed in 1898 by the British, who would then govern Sudan together with Egypt.

After waves of nationalist protests began in the early 50s led by key activists such as Ismail Al Azhari, Sudan achieved independence from Britain in 1956. While some Sudanese nationalists wanted to form a secular republic, a Sudanese political group known as the Samaniyya Order, followers of Muhammad Ahmad Al Mahdi’s interpretation of Sufi Islam, played on anti-British sentiments and managed to revive the House of Al Mahdi, with Muhammad Ahmad Al Mahdi’s son, Abdulrahman Al Mahdi being named as the first king of the newly independent Kingdom of Sudan.

King Abdulrahman immediately formed a Royal Council filled with supporters of the Al Mahdi royal family and religious clergymen who favoured his father’s interpretation of Islam. King Abdulrahman then launched the “Return to Sudan” campaign which banned Western dress in favour of Sudanese Arab-style robes, ban of Western names in favour of Arab ones, Islamisation of the education system & daily life, as well as a policy of isolationism that limited foreign visits to the country & banned Sudanese from traveling abroad without special permission. With the Kingdom of Sudan being non-communist it received US financial aid during the Cold War & through exporting its oil, King Abdulrahman & the royal family grew wealthy, silencing dissent with brutal force from the secret police as well as free healthcare & education.

In 1979, King Abdulrahman died and his eldest son Sadiq Al Mahdi became king. King Sadiq relaxed some of the laws that came with his father’s “Back to Sudan” campaign loosening restrictions on the importation of foreign technologies & allowing for some modern infrastructure to be built in the capital. Western education was also made available for elites and a select few soldiers in the military.


Read factbook

Nice dude, you'll make a good Sudan I'm sure

Liberalina wrote:"Egyptians aren't Arabs - their Schizophrenic Black Africans" - Oba Nneka

Oba Nneka is crazy xD

      FREE REPUBLIC OF MOZAMBIQUE OFFICIALLY RENAMED TRANSZAMBEZIA
      19 January 1996 - Maputo, Maputo Province, Free Republic of Transzambezia

| Ahead of the highly anticipated first Continental Council of Africa summit, expected to be held before the end of the year, President Machel has signed an executive order officially renaming the Free Republic of Mozambique into the Free Republic of Transzambezia. The decision was made partly out of respect for the Republic of Northern Mozambique, who has been independent for nearly twenty years as opposed to Transzambezia's two years of independence, and also to avoid confusion in international business and politics between the two Mozambiques. |

| The name change is expected to be quite costly, as all mentions to the Free Republic of Mozambique must now be redone to change Mozambique to Transzambezia. However, the ruling FRELIMO party has backed the decision stating that "the change to Transzambezia also signifies a shift from colonial naming policies, with our nation still bearing the name of an island not even within our borders" referring to Mozambique Island. Despite the change, Mozambique Liberation Front will continue to retain its name as such due to its instrumentality in establishing independence, if in two parts, for Portuguese Mozambique. |

Antagarichh wrote:
    First Citizen Barre: "Well, since the East African Federation has become the largest economy in Africa, I've been struggling to keep the Crisis as limited as possible, but unfortunately all of Africa has been affected harshly. However, domestically in the Federation I have been instituting socialist policies to prevent famine and encourage stock market stability and business growth while preventing monopolization."

    President Machel: "And as a Marxist-Leninist, I've essentially enacted policies much the same but a little more revolutionary than my Somali comrade. However, the effect has been the same- stability. We're hoping that the establishment of the Council of Africa will oversee the implementation of similar policies across the Continent which will not have just the effect of creating stability throughout the nations, but spreading revolutionary principles throughout Africa which will lead to a future where the countries of Africa can share a common market and, hopefully, begin the process of further unification as we pursue pan-Africanism."

President Rashida
The issue with our nation is that we over produce food famine is not an issue for our nation luckily, but in almost every other sector we lagg far behind. We have very little infrastructure, we lack any real industrial base. And since there’s just not enough jobs created from our farming industry, there are very limited jobs for people to take. The military is sadly the highest employer other than agriculture. And we only employ about 65,000 people. So perhaps we can make a few trade offs. You need food and we need jobs. So what can we do to help each other.

«12. . .86,17286,17386,17486,17586,17686,17786,178. . .86,82286,823»

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