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Ns football league wrote:Hey guys and gals

I've setup a football league where the winner is decided by votes. No need to move regions, everyone everywhere can vote.

New poll is underway with new teams:

Nationstates Football World

Take care and have fun

#LazarusForBasel

Props to the Swiss, amazing country. Good cheese, good chocolate, good clocks, and a surprisingly uncorrupt political system for the modern day and age.

Killer Kitty, Guiness Freaks, and Ns football league

Guiness Freaks wrote:Love to take an unpaid half day from work to pay the entire cost of the visit and sit at the doctor's office to not be seen in over an hour if anyone is wondering how well the US health care system is for me personally.

Do you have health insurance?

Personally I'm glad to live in a nation with mandatory public health insurance, although at 800€/month it's not cheap for me.

Leonism wrote:Do you have health insurance?

Personally I'm glad to live in a nation with mandatory public health insurance, although at 800€/month it's not cheap for me.

Yes I do and that's the bull of it. Dear leader has a high deductible plan so basically he needs to go to the hospital to cover the deductible but that means come up with 4k in cash to cover. Its absolutely ridiculous and I hate it so much.

The plus side of seeing the doctor today was finding out dear leader has lost nearly 20 pounds since February per his doctors recommendation. only 20 more to reach his target weight. Beers on dear leader. He needs a shower after gardening.

Zetaopalatopia wrote:The Science and Military History clubs are glad to announce that they will be collaborating for this year's science fair! The theme for the fair being Nuclear Countermeasures, and Radiation Proofing. As always, the fair is open to all ages and skill levels.

And since we since with this recurring theme of nuclear love/hate I have remembered a song from an old electronic Spanish band. (They are a science fiction / humor (ironic) / political)

Aviador Dro - Nuclear, sí [Nuclear, Yes]

With the chorus ...
Nuclear si / Nuclear yes
Por supuesto / Of course
Nuclear si / Nuclear yes
Como no! / How not!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sMNOJXyN6l0

The lyrics from anybody interested:
https://translate.google.com/#view=home&op=translate&sl=es&tl=en&text=Nuclear%20si%0APor%20supuesto%0ANuclear%20si%0AComo%20no!%0AYo%20quiero%20ba%C3%B1arme%20en%20mares%20de%20radio%0ACon%20nubes%20de%20estroncio%20cobalto%20y%20plutonio%0AYo%20quiero%20tener%20envolturas%20de%20plomo%0AY%20ni%C3%B1os%20mutantes%20montando%20en%20sus%20motos%0ADesiertas%20ruinas%20con%20bellas%20piscinas%0AMujeres%20etereas%20con%20voz%20de%20vampiras%0Arobots%20multiformes%20buscando%20en%20las%20calles%0Alos%20restos%20inertes%20del%20antiguo%20hombre%0ANuclear%20si%0APor%20supuesto%0ANuclear%20si%0AComo%20no!%0AColinas%20ardientes%20de%20sol%20abrasadas%0Aciudades%20inmensas%20habitadas%20por%20ciborgs%0ASerpientes%20monstruosas%20devorando%20casas%0Ay%20naves%20enormes%20de%20formas%20extra%C3%B1as%0AVolcanes%20rugientes%20escupiendo%20lava%0Ay%20bosques%20violetas%20con%20cesped%20naranja%0ACavernas%20ocultas%20en%20playas%20profundas%0AY%20valles%20cubiertos%20de%20flores%20aladas.

That's a lot of percentage signs.

Aigania, Great Uralia, and Kaskardia

Guiness Freaks wrote:That's a lot of percentage signs.

Almost as many ripples on a Tubbius.

Leonism wrote:Do you have health insurance?

Personally I'm glad to live in a nation with mandatory public health insurance, although at 800€/month it's not cheap for me.

Eh, public healthcare is merely partially relieving the symptoms of the bigger problem, which is that the government can't effectively prescribe a solution (i.e. regulations) for economic problems when the circumstances it's working with (e.g. what people need, what products are available, which are treatments are cheapest, which are most effective, how many doctors there are who can do that particular thing, how good the said doctors, et cetera ad nauseam) are all in constant flux. All of those things are constantly changing, and government solutions don't adapt to them (even automatic adjustments for price changes are a clumsy proxy for actual human intellect), so regulations rapidly become meaningless or even harmful. Typically, government imposing its own plans on a bunch of other people results in consequences the government wasn't expecting because they try to circumvent the government's restrictions, which are pretty much always harmful to the person(s) being regulated (unsurprisingly, if what the government wanted them to do was good for them, they'd typically do it without being told to). Consequently, the government must impose more regulations to try to stop people from exploiting so-called "loopholes," which results in still more unexpected consequences, until the system is so amazingly convoluted that everything would run more efficiently if the government just took full control.

When you have public healthcare, the government makes everything run smoother by eliminating a lot of the variables. For example, governments typically specify a list of preferred drugs (preferred for their cost, of course) that one must try before the doctor can prescribe something else, and sometimes, better, newer versions of existing drugs are inaccessible entirely. There are probably also excessive wait times (an average wait longer than 30 minutes for a physician is unreasonable); this happens because the government almost always pays doctors less than equilibrium wages, resulting in shortages of doctors. This has resulted in people dying in hospital waiting rooms on numerous occasions (see for examples https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/08/29/brian-sinclair-winnipeg_n_3837008.html, https://globalnews.ca/news/5082756/woman-dies-new-brunswick-emergency-room/). Doctors and nurses in such systems also tend to be poorly trained, since the shortages cause the government to hire anyone who nominally meets the basic standards and will accept the substandard pay. This also leads to senseless fatalities (e.g. https://bc.ctvnews.ca/he-drew-his-last-breath-in-my-arms-widow-on-doctor-s-waiting-room-death-1.3335079).

So yeah, public healthcare works better than the private-but-heavily-regulated nonsense in the United States, but it would work better if the government didn't touch this stuff at all. And before anyone says that the Affordable Care Act was necessary because the health insurance market was broken, I will remind them that the health insurance market was broken because of government wage ceiling and tax incentives (https://www.cbsnews.com/news/the-road-to-obamacare-how-did-we-get-here/, also https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/commentary/ct-obamacare-health-care-employers-20170224-story.html).

Medai

Leonism wrote:Do you have health insurance?

Personally I'm glad to live in a nation with mandatory public health insurance, although at 800€/month it's not cheap for me.

Also, is that 800€/month ($896/month) for you individually? If so, that's obscenely expensive. My family of four pays $840 per month total (would be ~$1400 per month if you exclude tax deductions), and it's only that expensive because the government is gouging us for $500 a month because my brother became eligible for Medicaid (gov. insurance for poor people) at some point, which nobody ever informed us of, so we just bought private insurance for him, which you apparently cannot do if you are eligible for Medicaid without paying a $600/month waiver. (Again, nobody we know had ever heard of this until the gov. decided to beat us over the head with it.) Why the state is so hellbent on spending more money is beyond me.

And, of course, canceling your previously-signed insurance policy in the middle of the one-year term incurs a hefty "tax" (it's actually a fine, but Democrats started calling it a tax because fools on the Supreme Court decided that calling it one thing or another is the key determinant of whether it's legal).

Dear leader didnt mean to start a conversation about health insurance but he is enjoying the perspective as things as not good where he lives anyway and he doesn't see any good coming up. Anyway he just bought tickets for avengers end game for Friday morning to take the twins. He will not be posting spoilers. #thanoswasright

Kaskardia

@Medai

The insurance system in my country (Germany) is quite complex and the government only indirectly controls it.

Having health insurance is mandatory here. It generally costs 14.6% of your income, but is capped at said 800€/month. One can choose any one of about 200 public health insurance companies. If you exceed a certain monthly income threshold, about 4000€, you can opt out of the public insurers and select a private company instead. About 10% of the population do so, while the vast majority is publicly insured.

The main differences are that public insurance covers the entire family (in this case my wife's insurance covers herself and both of our children, and she pays only about 100€/month), while private insurance needs to be taken for each individual child. If you are young and healthy, private insurance tends to be cheaper than public insurance, but as you get older and have more chronic illnesses, this changes and private can become much more expensive as it is not capped in the same way.

Private insurance usually makes you eligible to be treated by the doctor heading his department when in a hospital, and can make you eligible for staying in a single-bed hospital room (most wards have 2 to 4 patients per room). You also get appointments faster.

The quality of care is generally the same and there's no way in the system to pay for "better" treatment. The kind of treatment paid for by all health insurance companies is regulated by a body called G-BA which includes doctors, hospital managers, health insurance companies and patient representatives.

The minimum coverage is vast and includes almost all treatments available to modern medicine, including special examinations and almost all surgical procedures. Most of the system works like a flat-rate for patients, apart from their monthly insurance deductions they don't pay anything, with the exception of certain medicines and fees of e.g. 10€/day for hospital stays.

There are no restrictions in on how often you can visit a doctor and you can choose your doctor freely and change any time. You can also skip the GP and go straight to the specialist of your desire, although this may incur having to wait for weeks, sometimes months, for an appointment (the only thing really where private insurance is an advantage).

As you mentioned, public health insurance is restricting the payment doctors receive, although this happens indirectly in Germany.

As a resident anaesthesist with 5 years of post-graduate experience, working at a German university hospital, I get about 5600€/month before taxes and social security contributions. But also before extra pay for shift-work and overtime. If you factor all thus in, I earn about 4000€ after taxes and social security deductions.
This is low compared to other countries like the US, so many German doctors went abroad and now work in Switzerland, Scandinavia, UK, US or Australia, where working conditions for doctors are generally more favourable.

From the patients side I don't think there are many nations in the world who have it much better, on the contrary, we increasingly get "medical tourists" from abroad because the standard of treatment is so high while end-user costs are low.

Arguably, the UK with the NHS has nearly the same outcomes but at a lesser cost (IIRC UK 9% of GDP, Germany 11% and US 16%), but with much more stressful conditions for patients (longer waiting times, more restrictions on which doctors to visit etc.).

Kaskardia, Hycronesia, and Guiness Freaks

Guiness Freaks wrote:Dear leader didnt mean to start a conversation about health insurance but he is enjoying the perspective as things as not good where he lives anyway and he doesn't see any good coming up. Anyway he just bought tickets for avengers end game for Friday morning to take the twins. He will not be posting spoilers. #thanoswasright

That Thanos fellow might or might not be right, His Immensity puzzles, but at least Tubbius is left! Mmph mmph!

Hey guys! Hope you're all doing well.

Guiness Freaks wrote:That's a lot of percentage signs.

LOL. Yes, the problem of copy-pasting from google translator.

Interesting exchange of ideas about healthcare.

RL. Last day of 24hr on call. But on backup through next Thursday. I pray I don't get an an emergency service call downtown this weekend. Ohh I'm going to dread the traffic and crowds of the NFL draft.
200,000 to 300,000 people expected to be there. Well, back to the coal mine.

Hey y'all from Osiris!

leaves a pyramid in the middle of LazCorp

Rising from the dead is more unpleasant than I remember.

Valerievna wrote:Hey y'all from Osiris!

leaves a pyramid in the middle of LazCorp

Tubbius mmphs, confused, then orders the kitchen repositioned around said pyramid.

Margandy wrote:RL. Last day of 24hr on call. But on backup through next Thursday. I pray I don't get an an emergency service call downtown this weekend. Ohh I'm going to dread the traffic and crowds of the NFL draft.
200,000 to 300,000 people expected to be there. Well, back to the coal mine.

What kind of emergency service do you work in?

I work as an emergency physician (these are fairly common where I live, unlike the Anglo-American system where paramedics do all the pre-hospital work). This also fits in with the health care discussion above...

Treadwellia wrote:Tubbius mmphs, confused, then orders the kitchen repositioned around said pyramid.

The Copper States gather forbidden technology from the pyramid, then sell it to Poland at a huge markup. Now it can finally into space!

Imkiville wrote:💚

Let's give Imki a happy MMPH since she is back on the job as a Security Auditor for Lazarus! 🎅🏻

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