by Max Barry

Latest Forum Topics

Advertisement

Balder Board

Search

Search

[+] Advanced...

Author:

Region:

Sort:

«12. . .1,9791,9801,981

Bestelesnia wrote:Ok, now i really f u c k e d things up... i'm a corporate police state... DAMMIT I ONLY MISCLICKED ONE ISSUE 🤬🤬

Typical NationStates, annoying.

Bestelesnia wrote:I'm from Chile, and u?

Hello there

Iím from texas

Queen of Narnia wrote:Iím from texas

dude queen of narnia thats like the witch?

Rhendagar wrote:dude queen of narnia thats like the witch?

Properly speaking, Jadis was a usurper (as were King Caspian X's ancestors*), and thus no more "queen" than Lion King's Scar was "king." An illegitimate crown is no crown at all, legally speaking.

Helen, Lucy, Susan, and Ramandu's daughter (named Lilliandil by Douglas Gresham for the film) are legitimate Queens of Narnia, however. (And some of my favorite characters in literature, too. Helen and Lucy in particular.)

*Caspian is crowned by Aslan and has the tacit permission of the previous monarchs to take their place, so he and his descendants are legitimized rulers, until Narnia ends in The Last Battle.

Aelyria wrote:Properly speaking, Jadis was a usurper (as were King Caspian X's ancestors*), and thus no more "queen" than Lion King's Scar was "king." An illegitimate crown is no crown at all, legally speaking.

Helen, Lucy, Susan, and Ramandu's daughter (named Lilliandil by Douglas Gresham for the film) are legitimate Queens of Narnia, however. (And some of my favorite characters in literature, too. Helen and Lucy in particular.)

*Caspian is crowned by Aslan and has the tacit permission of the previous monarchs to take their place, so he and his descendants are legitimized rulers, until Narnia ends in The Last Battle.

thats quite detailed i only saw the 3 movies never read the books

Rhendagar wrote:thats quite detailed i only saw the 3 movies never read the books

They're really quite good. The book version of The Voyage of the Dawn Treader is MUCH MUCH better than the film, for example. My favorite is actually The Magician's Nephew, mostly because I deeply empathize with both of the protagonists (Polly and Digory) in different ways, though I understand that some feel it's a bit too "you already know what Narnia is and how Narnia works" compared to the others. There's a particular scene near the end that still brings me to tears today.

I highly recommend reading at least the book versions of the three that got turned into films; they're probably the three most beloved books of the series overall, and IMO they are quite good reads even for adults despite having children as their primary audience. (Lewis was strongly of the opinion that fairy tales can be for audiences of any age, they just communicate different things because adults see and understand things differently than children do.)

Aelyria wrote:They're really quite good. The book version of The Voyage of the Dawn Treader is MUCH MUCH better than the film, for example. My favorite is actually The Magician's Nephew, mostly because I deeply empathize with both of the protagonists (Polly and Digory) in different ways, though I understand that some feel it's a bit too "you already know what Narnia is and how Narnia works" compared to the others. There's a particular scene near the end that still brings me to tears today.

I highly recommend reading at least the book versions of the three that got turned into films; they're probably the three most beloved books of the series overall, and IMO they are quite good reads even for adults despite having children as their primary audience. (Lewis was strongly of the opinion that fairy tales can be for audiences of any age, they just communicate different things because adults see and understand things differently than children do.)

then one question is the asland the lion like jesus or god or is he meant to represent some other figure because in the movies he mentions that the kids know him by another name in theyr world

Rhendagar wrote:then one question is the asland the lion like jesus or god or is he meant to represent some other figure because in the movies he mentions that the kids know him by another name in theyr world

The Chronicles of Narnia are, in effect, a set of Christian speculative fiction: what if God chose to make another world, with talking animals and fairy-tale creatures and magic? So yes, Aslan is quite literally Jesus, and his father, the Emperor-Beyond-The-Sea, is quite literally the Judeo-Christian God. (Note that this differs from an allegory about these things: an allegory is a symbolic representation, whereas speculative fiction is in some sense "real and concrete." Lewis was very explicit that his books were NOT allegories--at least, not with regard to Aslan and such.)

So yes, the Narnia books have an inherently Christian philosophical tone to them, which should not surprise anyone who knows anything about the author. C.S. Lewis was a devout Christian and wrote several books about Christian philosophy and theology. However, although the books are colored by Christian faith, you don't need to be Christian to enjoy them; I have several non-Christian friends who love the books dearly. The stories are colored by Irish mythology and fairy-tale magic just as much as they are by Christian concepts. (Lewis was Irish, and always loved the myths and literature of his homeland.)

Issue #1343 is based of Germanwings Flight 9525

Virginian Inquisitors wrote:What happened to the queen? I've been gone a LONG time...

Idk

«12. . .1,9791,9801,981

Advertisement