by Max Barry

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Somehow the Collective got deleted, and I had to refound it.

First week is over and, as far as I know, no fascist students. If so, they usually drop my class the first week.

I had a run in with a self-avowed Nazi in the forum, but s/he hasn't bothered me since. Anyway, the case has been reported.

As Antifa, we must never give up our shared commitment to defending the victims of neofascism, neonazism, white identitarianism, the alt-right, and the like. If necessary, we must be willing to lay down our bodies between the fascist filth and their intended victims.

The enemy of the Left is within: a left-wing populism which opposes intersectionality, so-called social justice warriors (even as a tactic), and so forth. Marx was not a left-wing populist. He recognized that oppression was a complex, multifaceted, intersecting world-system.

Some communists support the state and others (including anarcho-communists and some libertarian Marxists, such as autonomist Marxists and council communists) want to see the state abolished (ASAP).

Other libertarian Marxists, such as Luxemburgists (i.e., including myself), are libertarian on an authoritarianism-libertarianism scale but do not object to a democratic proletarian state (at least on a temporary basis).
Marxist-Leninist-Stalinists are generally statists.

Trotskyists are all over the map on this issue. A good acquaintance of mine, for example, is a libertarian Trotskyist. I used to be a Trotskyist, and he and I get along quite well.

I have one class where all of my students have selected the NationStates semester exam. For the most part, they are having a good time.

A little secret:

Should a fascist, or anyone for that matter, wish to debate with you on their terms, flatly refuse. Should you consent, they will win. They know their rules much better than you do. Long after you are frustrated, they will be talking up a storm. Insist that they they dialogue with you following your own directions. Lay out a regimen, and never back down. Deftly lead them onto your turf of familiarity. Set out guidelines, and topics for discussion, which work to your advantage. In many cases, an unjustified self–confidence, sometimes conceit, will seduce the other person into acceding to your demands. At that point, the dispute has ended. You have now won the argument before it even got started.

Arguably, fascism is a form of liberation but altogether the wrong kind. Many fascists, oddly enough, apparently wish to liberate the oppressor from the oppressed. This pseudo–deliverance is unequivocally opposed by the Antifa Luxemburgist Communist Collective. Some fash crudely misappropriate the language and symbols of the Left, including populist references to revolution and the utilization of a fist clenched in solidarity. These confiscations, perhaps intended to hoodwink certain less informed people, may occasionally be successful. However, Antifa activists should persevere in an alertness to such deceptive activities and, when appropriate, directly and decisively challenge them. An indispensable facet of any effective praxis—which is far more important than one’s chosen leftist current—must be intellectual warfare.

To emphasize my Jewish bona fides, although I am a Levite (Hebrew, לֵוִי [MP3], Lēwiy, “joined” priestly tribe), a bar mitzvah (modified Hebrew, בַּר מִצְוָה, bạr miṣəwāh, “son of commandment”), and the child of two Ashkenazi (Hebrew, אַשְׁכְּנַזִּי, ʾẠšəkənạzziy, “German Rhinelander,” i.e., someone descended from Yiddish/Yiyḏiyš–speaking European Jews) parents, I do not practice Judaism. The term is rendered below into numerous languages:

• Yạhăḏūṯ (Hebrew/ʿIḇəriyṯ, יַהֲדוּת)
• Yahūdiyyaẗ (Arabic/ʾArabiyyaẗ;, يَهُودِيَّة)
• Yəhudinätə (Amharic//ʾÄmarəña, ይሁዲነት)
• Ýahūdiýat (Persian/Fār°sí; and Pashto/Paṣ̌°tū, یَهُودِیَت)
• Yahūdiyat (Sindhi/Sin°dʱī يَهُودِيَت)
• Ýahūdiýýat (Urdu//ʾUr°dū, یَہُودِیَّت)
• Ýahūdí D°harama (Shahmukhi Punjabi/Šāh Muḱ°hí Pun°ǧābí, يَھُودِي دْھَرَمَ)
• Yahūdī Dharama (Garamukhi Punjabi/Guramukhī Pajābī, ਯਹੂਦੀ ਧਰਮ)
• Yahūdī Dharma (Hindi/Hiṃdī, यहूदी धर्म)
• Yūtam (Tamil/Tamiḻ, யூதம்)
• Ihudīdharmamata (Bengali/Bāṅāli/Bānlā, ইহুদীধর্মমত [MP3])
• Musevîlik or Yahudilik (Turkish/Türk Dili)
• Yóutàijiào (Mandarin Chinese/Zhōngguó–Guānhuà, 犹太教)
• Yudaya Kyō (Japanese/Nihongo, ユダヤ教)
• Yut’aegyo (Korean/Han’gugŏ/Chosŏnmal, 유태교)
• Đạo Do Thái (Vietnamese/Tiếng Việt)
• Judaïsme (French/Français )
• Judaísmo (Spanish/Español, Portugese/Português, and Esperanto)
• Yehudisma (Lingwa de Planeta/Lidepla/LdP)
• Ġudaiżmu (Maltese/Malti)
• Judaizmus (Hungarian/Magyar Nyelv and Slovak/Slovák)
• Judaismus (Czech/Čeština)
• Jødedommen (Danish/Dansk and Norwegian/Norsk)
• Judendom (Swedish/Svenska)
• Juutalaisuus (Finnish/Suomi)
• Judentum (German/Deutsch)
• Jodendom or Judaïsme (Dutch/Nederlands)
• Ioudaïsmós (Modern Greek/Néa Ellēniká, Ιουδαϊσμόσ)