by Max Barry

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Balder RMB

WA Delegate: The Ancient Nordics Lands of Solorni (elected )

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Most Nations: 7th Most World Assembly Endorsements: 882nd Largest Black Market: 1,747th
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Welcome to the Realm of Balder

Nations are asked to join the World Assembly and endorse Queen Solorni as well as Prince North East Somerset

For nations the endorsement limit is 15


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Embassies: the West Pacific, Osiris, Lazarus, Europeia, The Land of Kings and Emperors, The North Pacific, the Pacific, The Communist Bloc, The East Pacific, the Rejected Realms, NationStates, The Allied Republics, Kingdom of Alexandria, and World Assembly Legislative League.

Tags: Democratic, Sinker, Map, Gargantuan, Anti-Fascist, Founderless, Past Tech, National Sovereigntist, Monarchist, Game Player, Independent, Regional Government, and 1 other.Offsite Forums.

Regional Power: Very High

Balder contains 5,417 nations, the 7th most in the world.

Today's World Census Report

The Most Scientifically Advanced in Balder

World Census researchers quantified national scientific advancement by quizzing random citizens about quantum chromodynamics, space-time curvature and stem cell rejuvenation therapies. Responses based on Star Trek were discarded.

As a region, Balder is ranked 4,390th in the world for Most Scientifically Advanced.

NationWA CategoryMotto
31.The World Crime League of DeadcatistanFather Knows Best State“Nobody makes me bleed my own blood!”
32.The Federation of AelyriaCivil Rights Lovefest“Through wisdom, unity, and honor, we create peace”
33.The Humanoid Republic of ArageshCivil Rights Lovefest“Keep up the faith, never let down nor surrender.”
34.The Ducks Sing Along To The Song of ZeuhlFather Knows Best State“Quack”
35.The High-Energy Lasers of Photonic NetworksFather Knows Best State“We need to increase efficiency!”
36.The Pod of OncerLeft-Leaning College State“Aru Aru”
37.The Free Republic of Rich ScholarsCapitalist Paradise“Knowledge (and money) is power”
38.The Constitutional Monarchy of Skywalker IslandNew York Times Democracy“There is no emotion, there is peace.”
39.The Rogue Nation of Warpfire 9Civil Rights Lovefest“Bleeding Hearts Are Best”
40.The Democratic States of MistillaniaLeft-wing Utopia“Liberty and Equality for All”
«1234567. . .541542»

Last poll: “Are You Ready For Some Football?”

Regional Happenings

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Balder Regional Message Board


General Election Results (Preliminary)

Seats - Political Party (Parliamentary Leader)

> 109 seats - Social Democratic and Liberal Party (Laurence Braeden)
> 093 seats - Conservative Party (Sir Frederic Roché-Thériault)
> 043 seats - Christian Democratic Party (Sir Christian Lüscher)
> 037 seats - Labour Party (Brigette Schmude)
> 034 seats - Moderate Party (Robert Brownlee)
> 033 seats - Independents
> 020 seats - Greens (Aurélie Garet and Eliot Fennell)
> 020 seats - National Democratic Party (Stanislaw Bökel)
> 019 seats - Socialist Party (Martine Lefebvre)
> 012 seats - Reform Option (Christopher Prentiss)

211 seats needed to form a majority

- Elections Genovia-Karlsruhe

omg the cons have 2nd most

Post self-deleted by Genovia-Karlsruhe.

wow let the good times roll

As a Shamrock Rovers and Spurs fan, I find this poll oddly difficult to vote on.

Genovia-Karlsruhe wrote:
General Election Results (Preliminary)

Seats - Political Party (Parliamentary Leader)

> 109 seats - Social Democratic and Liberal Party (Laurence Braeden)
> 093 seats - Conservative Party (Sir Frederic Roché-Thériault)
> 043 seats - Christian Democratic Party (Sir Christian Lüscher)
> 037 seats - Labour Party (Brigette Schmude)
> 034 seats - Moderate Party (Robert Brownlee)
> 033 seats - Independents
> 020 seats - Greens (Aurélie Garet and Eliot Fennell)
> 020 seats - National Democratic Party (Stanislaw Bökel)
> 019 seats - Socialist Party (Martine Lefebvre)
> 012 seats - Reform Option (Christopher Prentiss)

211 seats needed to form a majority

- Elections Genovia-Karlsruhe

General Election Results (Official)

Seats - Percentage of Votes - Political Party/Candidate List

> 112 seats - 23.84% - Social Democratic and Liberal Party
> 100 seats - 21.18% - Conservative Party
> 039 seats - 08.31% - Christian Democratic Party
> 037 seats - 08.97% - Labour Party
> 027 seats - 05.79% - Moderate Party
> 024 seats - 05.15% - Green Party
> 023 seats - 04.91% - Independents
> 022 seats - 04.80% - Socialist Party
> 021 seats - 04.60% - National Democratic Party
> 015 seats - 03.24% - Reform Option

> Turnout was 87.22%

All other parties/candidate lists failed to meet the 02.00% threshold to win seats in the Chamber of Representatives.

- Elections Genovia-Karlsruhe

Genovia-Karlsruhe wrote:General Election Results (Official)

Seats - Percentage of Votes - Political Party/Candidate List

> 112 seats - 23.84% - Social Democratic and Liberal Party
> 100 seats - 21.18% - Conservative Party
> 039 seats - 08.31% - Christian Democratic Party
> 037 seats - 08.97% - Labour Party
> 027 seats - 05.79% - Moderate Party
> 024 seats - 05.15% - Green Party
> 023 seats - 04.91% - Independents
> 022 seats - 04.80% - Socialist Party
> 021 seats - 04.60% - National Democratic Party
> 015 seats - 03.24% - Reform Option

> Turnout was 87.22%

All other parties/candidate lists failed to meet the 02.00% threshold to win seats in the Chamber of Representatives.

- Elections Genovia-Karlsruhe

Who can come up with a coalition government and a programme for government (legislative agenda)?

We are very curious to see what you could come up with. Additional information will be provided upon request.

Sincerely

420 seats, so 211 to win. Just off the top of my head here:

SDLP 112
LP 149
GP 173
SP 195
16 short of majority

What are the stances of the National Democrats or Reformists? I'm guessing the National Democrats are on the right, but I'm not entirely sure; if they're left-wing, they could combine with the above four parties for a majority. If the Reformists are on the left, they could combine with the above four to get exactly 210 for a dead-even split. Then, all the five-party coalition would have to do is pick off one Independent of 23 (because surely there has to be one left-wing Independent out there) to reach a majority (albeit a tight one).

For a centre-left coalition excluding the Socialists:

SDLP 112
LP 149
GP 173
38 short of a majority

This opens up many options if the removal of the Socialists make the coalition palatable to centrist parties. Moderate support can get to 200 seats, after which either Reformist votes or 11 of 23 Independents would be enough to pick up a majority. I'm pegging the Reformists as the better & more reliable bet here, though I'm just guessing that the Independents are probably clustered closer to each of the edges of politics than the Reformists. If the Moderates stay out, it would require every Independent to join the Reformists in the coalition. Just as it seems likely that there would be at least one left-wing Independent willing to join a left-wing coalition, it seems likely that there would be at least one right-wing (or far left-wing) Independent unwilling to join a centre-left coalition.

The keys for the left are: What are the political positions of the Moderates, Reformists, National Democrats, & Independents? The more left-wing, or at least less right-wing, they are, the more chance they stand at a coalition of about five parties. Any way it stands, if Mr. Braeden wants to get into power, he's got to do so with Labour & Green support, plus even more.

On a related note: What cabinet posts exist? I'm sure that Braeden would become PM, Schmude the Deputy PM or highest ranking cabinet minister, and either Garet or Fennell the Environment Minister, but I'm not sure what else. What are each party's key platform promises? What distinguishes one from another?

Alternatively, I'm curious as to see whether a right-wing coalition could be created.

CP 100
CDP 139
NDP 160
MP 187
RO 202
9 short of majority

With a massive five-party coalition, which I anticipate would span from the far right to the centre of national politics, Mr. Roché-Thériault would still require 9 votes from 23 Independents. The combination of all those parties spanning such a broad spectrum of politics would struggle to put a unified programme together, but the addition of so many Independents would make it so volatile that it would not likely last long.

So, here are my predictions for the best coalitions:

SDLP-LP-GP-SP-RO (210, 1 Independent required)
SDLP-LP-MP-GP-RO (215, 4 votes to be lost)

I'm not sure if any of you know who Jim Justice is. Elected governor of the American state of West Virginia as a Democrat, he switched parties to become a Republican recently. If even one party in the left-wing coalition can convince even one Independent to do something similar, they can reach (a razor-thin) majority. Alternatively, though it likely won't be terribly stable, the coalition could just convince an Independent to enter into a quasi-supply-&-demand agreement (I'm thinking of Arlene Foster here) or caucus with the coalition (like Bernie Sanders). Either way, or if the centre-left coalition is reached, Mr. Braeden seems set to govern precariously, but govern at that.

I'd love to hear what cabinet posts Mr. Braeden might be able to use as bait for his possible coalition partners, or if I'm misgauging the odds of any of those parties joining any of those possible respective coalitions with each other.

Alta Italia wrote:420 seats, so 211 to win. Just off the top of my head here:

SDLP 112
LP 149
GP 173
SP 195
16 short of majority

What are the stances of the National Democrats or Reformists? I'm guessing the National Democrats are on the right, but I'm not entirely sure; if they're left-wing, they could combine with the above four parties for a majority. If the Reformists are on the left, they could combine with the above four to get exactly 210 for a dead-even split. Then, all the five-party coalition would have to do is pick off one Independent of 23 (because surely there has to be one left-wing Independent out there) to reach a majority (albeit a tight one).

For a centre-left coalition excluding the Socialists:

SDLP 112
LP 149
GP 173
38 short of a majority

This opens up many options if the removal of the Socialists make the coalition palatable to centrist parties. Moderate support can get to 200 seats, after which either Reformist votes or 11 of 23 Independents would be enough to pick up a majority. I'm pegging the Reformists as the better & more reliable bet here, though I'm just guessing that the Independents are probably clustered closer to each of the edges of politics than the Reformists. If the Moderates stay out, it would require every Independent to join the Reformists in the coalition. Just as it seems likely that there would be at least one left-wing Independent willing to join a left-wing coalition, it seems likely that there would be at least one right-wing (or far left-wing) Independent unwilling to join a centre-left coalition.

The keys for the left are: What are the political positions of the Moderates, Reformists, National Democrats, & Independents? The more left-wing, or at least less right-wing, they are, the more chance they stand at a coalition of about five parties. Any way it stands, if Mr. Braeden wants to get into power, he's got to do so with Labour & Green support, plus even more.

On a related note: What cabinet posts exist? I'm sure that Braeden would become PM, Schmude the Deputy PM or highest ranking cabinet minister, and either Garet or Fennell the Environment Minister, but I'm not sure what else. What are each party's key platform promises? What distinguishes one from another?

Political position and key election policies

Social Democratic and Liberal Party (centre-left to left)

    Foreign (inc. Defence) policy: Supports increased regional cooperation and supports introduction of the Balder Freedom of Movement Agreement (allowing visa free access to Genovia-Karlsruhe; espouse a non-interventionist defence policy ('qualified pacificism') but supports the maintenance of current levels of military spending and continued military training exercises with allies; continued membership of the World Assembly, though an estimated 30% of the elected representatives opposes membership.
    Economic (inc. Energy) policy: Increase the highest band of income tax from 40% to 45%; separation of the energy companies into distinct 'energy generation' and 'energy transmission' companies, some within the party support the creation of a state-owned 'energy transmission' company; legislate to introduce the two tiered board structure (the management board and the supervisory board) for public and private corporations employing more the 2000 employees, with one-third of supervisory boards being employee or union representatives; continued use of nuclear energy in the current energy mix.
    Social (inc. Education) policy: Supports increased welfare spending, including the introduction of the 'baby box' (package contains children's clothes and other necessary items for one year for all newborns); introduction of mandatory language and skills training for all secondary students and the expansion of the Further and Technical Education College network; opposes strengthening restrictions on asylum seekers and immigrants and thus supports the integration of immigrants, and tax credits for companies that hire staff from immigrant and ethnic minorities.
    Previous coalition partners: Labour Party, with confidence and supply agreements with the Greens and Socialist Party.

Conservative Party (centre-right to right)

    Foreign (inc. Defence) policy: Supports increased regional cooperation and supports introduction of the Balder Freedom of Movement Agreement (allowing visa free access to Genovia-Karlsruhe; desires to pursue an interventionist defence policy, wants to negotiate a regional defence pact and supports the maintenance of current levels of military spending and continued military training exercises with allies; continued membership of the World Assembly, though an estimated 50% of the elected representatives opposes membership.
    Economic (inc. Energy) policy: Maintain the highest band of income tax from 40% and reduce the corporate tax rate from 30% to 25%; most opposes separation of the energy companies into distinct 'energy generation' and 'energy transmission' companies and strongly opposes the creation of a state-owned 'energy transmission' company; legislate that companies must advertise job openings locally for 90 days before they may advertise said jobs regionally.
    Social (inc. Education) policy: Supports the introduction of mandatory language and skills training for all secondary students and the expansion of the Further and Technical Education College network; strengthening restrictions on asylum seekers and immigrants namely language skills in order to ensure social cohesion and ease the stress on public services.
    Previous coalition partners: Christian Democratic Party, with confidence and supply agreements with the National Democratic Party.

Labour Party (centre-left to left)

    Foreign (inc. Defence) policy: Supports increased regional cooperation and nominally supports introduction of the Balder Freedom of Movement Agreement (allowing visa free access to Genovia-Karlsruhe) though an estimated 60% of the elected representatives opposes the agreement; supports a non-interventionist defence policy ('qualified pacificism') and the maintenance of current levels of military spending but opposes continued military training exercises with allies; neutral on membership of the World Assembly, .
    Economic (inc. Energy) policy: Legislate to introduce the two tiered board structure (the management board and the supervisory board) for public and private corporations employing more the 2,000 employees, with one-third of supervisory boards being employee or union representatives; supports continued use of nuclear energy in the current energy mix and the creation of the 'energy transmission' company; legislate for the introduction and regulation of paid apprenticeship and internships; legislate that companies must advertise job openings locally for 90 days before they may advertise said jobs regionally.
    Social (inc. Education) policy: Increased welfare spending, including the introduction of the 'baby box' (package contains children's clothes and other necessary items for one year for all newborns); introduction of mandatory language and skills training for all secondary students and the expansion of the Further and Technical Education College network; slightly supports strengthening restrictions on asylum seekers and immigrants.
    Previous coalition partners: Social Democratic and Liberal Party, Socialists and Greens.

Christian Democratic Party (right)

    Foreign (inc. Defence) policy: Supports no further regional cooperation and does not support introduction of the Balder Freedom of Movement Agreement (allowing visa free access to Genovia-Karlsruhe) though an estimated 25% of the elected representatives have announced their willingness to vote for the agreement; supports an assertive defence policy, the maintenance of current levels of military spending and continued military training exercises with allies; opposes membership of the World Assembly.
    Economic (inc. Energy) policy: Opposes the introduction the two tiered board structure (the management board and the supervisory board) for public and private corporations employing more the 2,000 employees, with one-third of supervisory boards being employee or union representatives; supports continued use of nuclear energy in the current energy mix and opposes any changes to the energy market; legislate that companies must advertise job openings locally for 90 days before they may advertise said jobs regionally;
    Social (inc. Education) policy: Opposes the legalisation of same sex marriage, the lifting on the prohibition of the donation of blood by 'men who sleep with men' and abortion; the reintroduction of religious education at the secondary education level; supports in principle the the introduction of the 'baby box' (package contains children's clothes and other necessary items for one year for all newborns). Opposes strongly the creation of a 'French Community'
    Previous coalition partners: Conservative Party.

Moderate Party (centre)

    Foreign (inc. Defence) policy: Supports further regional cooperation and the introduction of the Balder Freedom of Movement Agreement (allowing visa free access to Genovia-Karlsruhe); supports an assertive defence policy, the maintenance of current levels of military spending but opposes continued military training exercises with allies; supports membership of the World Assembly.
    Economic (inc. Energy) policy: Supports the introduction the two tiered board structure (the management board and the supervisory board) for public and private corporations employing more the 2,000 employees, with one-third of supervisory boards being employee or union representatives; supports continued use of nuclear energy in the current energy mix and opposes the nationalisation to the energy market; supports plans legislate that companies must advertise job openings locally for 90 days before they may advertise said jobs regionally; supports paid internships
    Social (inc. Education) policy: Supports the legalisation of same sex marriage, the lifting on the prohibition of the donation of blood by 'men who sleep with men' and abortion; the reintroduction of religious education at the secondary education level; supports in principle the the introduction of the 'baby box' (package contains children's clothes and other necessary items for one year for all newborns); neutral on the reintroduction of religious education at the secondary school level.
    Previous coalition partners: Party has official policy to not enter into coalition government with neither the Social Democrats or the Conservatives, but will not oppose any coalition which is formed.

Greens Party (left)

    Foreign (inc. Defence) policy: Supports further regional cooperation and the introduction of the Balder Freedom of Movement Agreement (allowing visa free access to Genovia-Karlsruhe); opposes an assertive defence policy, the maintenance of current levels of military spending but opposes continued military training exercises with allies; supports membership of the World Assembly.
    Economic (inc. Energy) policy: Supports the introduction the two tiered board structure (the management board and the supervisory board) for public and private corporations employing more the 2,000 employees, with one-third of supervisory boards being employee or union representatives; opposes continued use of nuclear energy in the current energy mix and supports the nationalisation to the energy market; supports paid internships.
    Social (inc. Education) policy: Supports the legalisation of same sex marriage, the lifting on the prohibition of the donation of blood by 'men who sleep with men' and abortion; the reintroduction of religious education at the secondary education level; supports in principle the the introduction of the 'baby box' (package contains children's clothes and other necessary items for one year for all newborns); mostly neutral on the reintroduction of religious education at the secondary school level; opposes any attempts to restrict immigration.
    Previous coalition partners: Social Democratic and Liberal Party, Labour Party and Socialist Party

National Democratic Party (far-right)

    Foreign (inc. Defence) policy: Vehemently opposes further regional cooperation and the introduction of the Balder Freedom of Movement Agreement (allowing visa free access to Genovia-Karlsruhe); supports an assertive defence policy, the maintenance of current levels of military spending and supports continued military training exercises with allies; opposes membership of the World Assembly.
    Economic (inc. Energy) policy: Opposes the introduction the two tiered board structure (the management board and the supervisory board) for public and private corporations employing more the 2,000 employees, with one-third of supervisory boards being employee or union representatives; supports continued use of nuclear energy in the current energy mix and opposes the nationalisation to the energy market; mandate that public works projects must employ a 3:2 ratio of local staff to foreign labour on all publicly funded projects.
    Social (inc. Education) policy: Opposes the legalisation of same sex marriage, the lifting on the prohibition of the donation of blood by 'men who sleep with men' and abortion; supports the reintroduction of religious education at the secondary education level; supports in principle the the introduction of the 'baby box' (package contains children's clothes and other necessary items for one year for all newborns); supports the imposition of stronger controls on immigration, particularly on language skills.
    Previous coalition partners: Conservative Party and Christian Democratic Party.

Socialist Party (far-left)

    Foreign (inc. Defence) policy: Vehemently opposes further regional cooperation and the introduction of the Balder Freedom of Movement Agreement (allowing visa free access to Genovia-Karlsruhe); opposes an assertive defence policy, the maintenance of current levels of military spending and continued military training exercises with allies; opposes membership of the World Assembly.
    Economic (inc. Energy) policy: Supports the introduction the two tiered board structure (the management board and the supervisory board) for public and private corporations employing more the 2,000 employees, with half of supervisory boards being employee or union representatives; supports continued use of nuclear energy in the current energy mix and supports the nationalisation to the energy market; support state ownership (51% shares in all companies) of other key industries; mandate that public works projects must employ a 3:2 ratio of local staff to foreign labour on all publicly funded projects.
    Social (inc. Education) policy: Neutral towards the legalisation of same sex marriage, the lifting on the prohibition of the donation of blood by 'men who sleep with men' and abortion; opposes the reintroduction of religious education at the secondary education level and supports its removal from public education; supports the the introduction of the 'baby box' (package contains children's clothes and other necessary items for one year for all newborns); supports the imposition of stronger controls on immigration, particularly on language skills.
    Previous coalition partners: Labour Party, most members are not keen on supporting a SDLP-Labour coalition believing Braeden leans too much to the right economically.

Option Réformateur (Reform Option) (regionalist; linguistic)

    Foreign (inc. Defence) policy: No official policy.
    Economic (inc. Energy) policy: Formation of a 'French Community' with the devolution of powers on taxation and social services from the federal and provincial governments to a devolved government; supports the formation of a French Community owned energy company; supports in principle that public works projects must employ a 3:2 ratio of local staff to foreign labour on all publicly funded projects.
    Social (inc. Education) policy: Supports the the introduction of the 'baby box' (package contains children's clothes and other necessary items for one year for all newborns); supports the imposition of stronger controls on immigration, particularly on language skills namely French; supports the creation of a French Community specific immigration agency and visa.
    Party Profile: 20% leans left, 30% centre (can be swayed) and 60% leans right.

Independents

    Foreign (inc. Defence) policy: Party profile: 30% leans left, 30% centre (can be swayed) and 40% leans right.
    Economic (inc. Energy) policy: Party Profile: 20% leans left, 20% centre (can be swayed) and 60% leans right.
    Social (inc. Education) policy: Party Profile: 40% leans left, 50% centre (can be swayed) and 10% leans right.
Read factbook


Current Cabinet - Second Roché-Thériault Ministry
(Cabinet actuel - Deuxième Roché-Thériault ministère;
Aktuelle Cabinet - Zweite Roche-Thériault Ministerium
)

    Prime Minister
    (Premier ministre; Ministerpräsident)
    Federal Minister for the Civil Service
    (Ministre fédéral de la Fonction Publique; Bundesminister für den Öffentlicher Dienst):
    Frederic Roché-Thériault

    Deputy Prime Minister
    (Vice-Premier Ministre; Stellvertretende Ministerpräsident)
    Federal Minister of the Economy, Finance and Strategy
    (Ministre fédéral des l'Economie, Finances et Stratégie;
    Bundesminister für Wirtschaft, Finanzen und Strategie
    ):
    Graeme Russell

    Federal Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Development
    (Ministre fédéral des Affaires Etrangères et du Développement International;
    Bundesminister für Auswärtige Angelegenheiten und Internationalen Entwicklungs
    ):
    Albert Gössi

    Federal Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Management
    (Ministre fédéral de Sécurité publique et Gestion des urgences;
    Bundesminister des Öffentliche Sicherheit und Notfallmanagement
    ):
    Christian Lüscher

    Federal Minister of National Defence
    (Ministre fédéral de la Défense national; Bundesminister der Nationale Verteidigung):
    Maj. Madeleine de Courten

    Federal Minister of International Trade, Industry and Entrepreneurship
    (Ministre fédéral du Commerce international, l'Industrie et l'Entrepreneuriat;
    Bundesminister für Internationaler Handel, Industrie und Unternehmertum
    ):
    Pierre-Alain Freysinger

    Federal Minister of Employment, Productivity and Skills Development
    (Ministre fédéral de l'Emploi, Productivité et Développement des compétences;
    Bundesminister für Beschäftigung, Produktivität und Qualifizierung
    ):
    Marianne van der Pol

    Federal Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development
    (Ministre fédéral de la Justice et du Développement Constitutionnel;
    Bundesminister für Justiz und Verfassungsentwicklung
    ):
    Alexandra Hardinge

    Federal Minister of Infrastructure, Communications, Energy and Transport
    (Ministre fédéral de Infrastructure, Communications, Energie et Transport;
    Bundesminister für Infrastruktur, Kommunikation, Energie und Verkehr
    ):
    Nathaniel Spreitler

    Federal Minister of Education and Research
    (Ministre fédéral de l'Education et Recherche;
    Bundesministerin für Bildung und Forschung]
    ):
    Caroline Tornare

    Federal Minister of Health
    (Ministre fédéral de la Santé; Bundesministerin für Gesundheit):
    Dr. Claudia Fehr

    Federal Minister of Social Development, Families and Welfare
    (Ministre fédéral pour le Développement Social, Familles et Aide Sociale
    Bundesminister für Soziale Entwicklung, Familien und Wohlfahrt
    ):
    Helena Rollins

    Federal Minister of Agriculture, the Environment and Natural Resources
    (Ministre fédéral de l'Agriculture, Environnement et Ressources Naturelles;
    Bundesminister für Landwirtschaft, Umwelt und natürliche Ressourcen
    ):
    Catherine Blackburn

    Federal Minister for Immigration and Citizenship
    (Ministre fédéral de l'Immigration et de la Citoyenneté;
    Bundesminister für Einwanderung und Staatsbürgerschaft
    ):
    Sebastian Wersching

    Federal Associate Minister for Government Policy and Institutional Reform
    (Associés-ministres fédéral pour la Politique gouvernementale et Réforme Institutionnelle;
    Mitarbeiterin Bundesminister für Regierungspolitik und Institutionelle Reform
    ):
    Susanne Landolt

    Federal Deputy Minister for the Budget and Financial Programming
    (Sous-ministre fédéral pour au Budget et Programmation Financière;
    Stellvertretende Bundesminister für die Finanzplanung und Haushalt
    ):
    Wolfgang Rösler

    Federal Deputy Minister for Climate Change, Nuclear Safety and Sustainable Development
    (Sous-ministre fédéral pour le Changement climatique, la Sécurité nucléaire et le Développement durable;
    Stellvertretende Bundesminister für Klimawandel, nukleare Sicherheit und nachhaltige Entwicklung
    )
    Theresia Krestchmann

    Federal Associate Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy
    (Associés-ministres fédéral pour Large bande, Communications et l'économie numérique;
    Mitarbeiterin Bundesminister für Breitband, Kommunikation und digitale Wirtschaft
    ):
    Tatiana Reimann

    Federal Associate Minister for Culture, Media, Sport and Tourism
    (Associés-ministre fédéral de la Culture, Médias, Sports et Tourisme
    Mitarbeiterin Bundesminister für Kultur, Medien, Sport und Tourismus
    ):
    Dr. Lucas Moser

    Federal Associate Minister for Regional Cooperation
    (Associés-ministre fédéral de la Coopération régionale; Mitarbeiterin Bundesminister für Regionale Kooperation):
    Theodore Brownlee

Read factbook

We hope these help.

Sincerely

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