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Balder RMB

WA Delegate: The Ancient Nordics Lands of Solorni (elected )

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Embassies: the West Pacific, Osiris, Lazarus, Europeia, The Land of Kings and Emperors, The North Pacific, the Pacific, The Communist Bloc, The East Pacific, the Rejected Realms, NationStates, The Allied Republics, Kingdom of Alexandria, and World Assembly Legislative League.

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Regional Power: Very High

Balder contains 5,442 nations, the 7th most in the world.

Today's World Census Report

The Largest Pizza Delivery Sector in Balder

World Census staff spent many nights answering the front door in order to measure which nations have the biggest Pizza Delivery industries.

As a region, Balder is ranked 8,386th in the world for Largest Pizza Delivery Sector.

NationWA CategoryMotto
2,451.The Republic of Drecq IICapitalizt“Nihil Sine Justitia”
2,452.The Free Land of OakenianaDemocratic Socialists“Why do you care?”
2,453.The Republic of Genji GanjuInoffensive Centrist Democracy“Live Long And Prosper”
2,454.The Grand Duchy of Radio BobbyInoffensive Centrist Democracy“No more tears, only Bobby.”
2,455.The Holy Empire of Oxbridge UnitedLiberal Democratic Socialists“Mottos are for Losers”
2,456.The Federal Parliamentary Empire of Talasatenin EmpireInoffensive Centrist Democracy“For Freedom, For Equality, For The Empire!”
2,457.The Kingdom of KailethiaInoffensive Centrist Democracy“Never fall, never succumb ”
2,458.The Democratic Republic of LasangkuaInoffensive Centrist Democracy“Selalu dalam pelayanan dengan bimbingan Tuhan”
2,459.The Democratic States of LicnoslobodaInoffensive Centrist Democracy“Victory. Liberty. Happiness.”
2,460.The Protectorate of SantiagoAnarchy“발해의 승리에 과 대한 세상의 악화”
«12. . .243244245246247248249. . .544545»

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The Dashing Former Delegate of Badger wrote:Which of the Best Picture nominations was your favorite film of 2017?

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420 seats, so 211 to win. Just off the top of my head here:

SDLP 112
LP 149
GP 173
SP 195
16 short of majority

What are the stances of the National Democrats or Reformists? I'm guessing the National Democrats are on the right, but I'm not entirely sure; if they're left-wing, they could combine with the above four parties for a majority. If the Reformists are on the left, they could combine with the above four to get exactly 210 for a dead-even split. Then, all the five-party coalition would have to do is pick off one Independent of 23 (because surely there has to be one left-wing Independent out there) to reach a majority (albeit a tight one).

For a centre-left coalition excluding the Socialists:

SDLP 112
LP 149
GP 173
38 short of a majority

This opens up many options if the removal of the Socialists make the coalition palatable to centrist parties. Moderate support can get to 200 seats, after which either Reformist votes or 11 of 23 Independents would be enough to pick up a majority. I'm pegging the Reformists as the better & more reliable bet here, though I'm just guessing that the Independents are probably clustered closer to each of the edges of politics than the Reformists. If the Moderates stay out, it would require every Independent to join the Reformists in the coalition. Just as it seems likely that there would be at least one left-wing Independent willing to join a left-wing coalition, it seems likely that there would be at least one right-wing (or far left-wing) Independent unwilling to join a centre-left coalition.

The keys for the left are: What are the political positions of the Moderates, Reformists, National Democrats, & Independents? The more left-wing, or at least less right-wing, they are, the more chance they stand at a coalition of about five parties. Any way it stands, if Mr. Braeden wants to get into power, he's got to do so with Labour & Green support, plus even more.

On a related note: What cabinet posts exist? I'm sure that Braeden would become PM, Schmude the Deputy PM or highest ranking cabinet minister, and either Garet or Fennell the Environment Minister, but I'm not sure what else. What are each party's key platform promises? What distinguishes one from another?

Alternatively, I'm curious as to see whether a right-wing coalition could be created.

CP 100
CDP 139
NDP 160
MP 187
RO 202
9 short of majority

With a massive five-party coalition, which I anticipate would span from the far right to the centre of national politics, Mr. Roché-Thériault would still require 9 votes from 23 Independents. The combination of all those parties spanning such a broad spectrum of politics would struggle to put a unified programme together, but the addition of so many Independents would make it so volatile that it would not likely last long.

So, here are my predictions for the best coalitions:

SDLP-LP-GP-SP-RO (210, 1 Independent required)
SDLP-LP-MP-GP-RO (215, 4 votes to be lost)

I'm not sure if any of you know who Jim Justice is. Elected governor of the American state of West Virginia as a Democrat, he switched parties to become a Republican recently. If even one party in the left-wing coalition can convince even one Independent to do something similar, they can reach (a razor-thin) majority. Alternatively, though it likely won't be terribly stable, the coalition could just convince an Independent to enter into a quasi-supply-&-demand agreement (I'm thinking of Arlene Foster here) or caucus with the coalition (like Bernie Sanders). Either way, or if the centre-left coalition is reached, Mr. Braeden seems set to govern precariously, but govern at that.

I'd love to hear what cabinet posts Mr. Braeden might be able to use as bait for his possible coalition partners, or if I'm misgauging the odds of any of those parties joining any of those possible respective coalitions with each other.

Alta Italia wrote:420 seats, so 211 to win. Just off the top of my head here:

SDLP 112
LP 149
GP 173
SP 195
16 short of majority

What are the stances of the National Democrats or Reformists? I'm guessing the National Democrats are on the right, but I'm not entirely sure; if they're left-wing, they could combine with the above four parties for a majority. If the Reformists are on the left, they could combine with the above four to get exactly 210 for a dead-even split. Then, all the five-party coalition would have to do is pick off one Independent of 23 (because surely there has to be one left-wing Independent out there) to reach a majority (albeit a tight one).

For a centre-left coalition excluding the Socialists:

SDLP 112
LP 149
GP 173
38 short of a majority

This opens up many options if the removal of the Socialists make the coalition palatable to centrist parties. Moderate support can get to 200 seats, after which either Reformist votes or 11 of 23 Independents would be enough to pick up a majority. I'm pegging the Reformists as the better & more reliable bet here, though I'm just guessing that the Independents are probably clustered closer to each of the edges of politics than the Reformists. If the Moderates stay out, it would require every Independent to join the Reformists in the coalition. Just as it seems likely that there would be at least one left-wing Independent willing to join a left-wing coalition, it seems likely that there would be at least one right-wing (or far left-wing) Independent unwilling to join a centre-left coalition.

The keys for the left are: What are the political positions of the Moderates, Reformists, National Democrats, & Independents? The more left-wing, or at least less right-wing, they are, the more chance they stand at a coalition of about five parties. Any way it stands, if Mr. Braeden wants to get into power, he's got to do so with Labour & Green support, plus even more.

On a related note: What cabinet posts exist? I'm sure that Braeden would become PM, Schmude the Deputy PM or highest ranking cabinet minister, and either Garet or Fennell the Environment Minister, but I'm not sure what else. What are each party's key platform promises? What distinguishes one from another?

Political position and key election policies

Social Democratic and Liberal Party (centre-left to left)

    Foreign policy: supports further participation by Genovia-Karlsruhe in international organizations and increased regional cooperation; note that an estimated 30% of elected representatives opposes membership of the World Assembly. The Social Democratic and Liberal Party supports increased international efforts on the part of Genovia-Karlsruhe in the areas of peace keeping and human rights and supports the maintenance of current levels of military spending and continued military training exercises with allies. Does not support military neutrality.
    Economic policy: rejects policies of economic liberalization such as deregulation, lowering taxes for high-income citizens, and decreases in government spending on social insurance. Some members (estimated to be 25%) of the Social Democratic and Liberal Party actually supports raising the retirement age; however, the party has remained neutral. In addition, the Social Democratic and Liberal Party is a proponent of increasing welfare spending in some areas such as for a publicly financed maternity leave, universal health care and a flexible retirement age. In tax policy the Social Democratic and Liberal Party opposes the notion of lowering taxes for high-income citizens. The Social Democratic and Liberal Party is skeptical toward the privatization of state enterprises; but, nonetheless, promotes more competition in the areas of agriculture and parallel imports.
    Social policy: committed to social equity and an open society, thus aims at making working conditions for women in families easier by promoting more external childcare centers and more opportunities for part-time jobs. It also aims at reinforcing sexual equality in terms of eliminating wage differences based on gender, supports civil union for homosexuals and takes an easier stance toward abortions. The Social Democratic and Liberal Party also rejects strengthening restrictions on asylum seekers and immigrants.
    Key election promises: reversing the proposed full or partial privatization of state owned corporations and entities (Genovia-Karlsruhe Railways); increasing the highest band of income tax from 40% to 45% for those earning more than 350,000 pounds per annum; separation of the energy companies into distinct 'energy generation' and 'energy transmission' companies; supports notionally the creation of a state owned energy transmission company; introduce the two tiered board structure (the management board and the supervisory board) for public and private corporations employing more the 2000 employees; rejects the Rustamov Report, which recommended the introduction of a single-payer healthcare system in lieu of the current National Health Service model - though Braeden personally endorses it; supports the introduction of the Balder Freedom of Movement Agreement (allowing visa free access to Genovia-Karlsruhe); introduction of mandatory language and skills training for all secondary students and the expansion of the Further and Technical Education College network; supports the introduction of the baby box (package contains children's clothes and other necessary items for one year for all newborns); expansion of ecotax reforms and increased state support for energy saving measures and renewable energies; supports taking more refugees from regional conflicts; opposes the creation of a 'French Community'.

Conservative Party (centre-right to right)

    Foreign policy: supports further participation by Genovia-Karlsruhe in international organizations and increased regional cooperation; but believe these institutions are in immediate need for democratic reform. The Conservative Party supports increased international efforts on the part of Genovia-Karlsruhe in the areas of peace keeping and human rights and believes that increased military spending and continued military training exercises with allies will ultimately help in achieving those goals. The Conservative Party is vehemently opposed the policy of military neutrality, believing that it "sends the wrong message that we are unwilling to stand with our allies, and ultimately makes us less safe'.
    Economic policy: supports supply-side economics; thus it is a proponent of lower taxes and is against deficit spending believing that both should result in higher economic growth. The Conservative Party advocates for policies of economic liberalization such as deregulation, lowering taxes for high-income citizens, and decreases in government spending on social insurance. The Conservative Party believes that that the state should not be a participant in the economy through the owning of companies; instead, the government should be a 'regulator and stimulator' where it provides non-excessive but ample regulation that fosters economy growth and protection for consumers and competition.
    Social policy: works toward a society offering genuine opportunities with flexible choices in education, work and family support. It is also aiming at more and better jobs, a sustainable social welfare system which will result in strong national cohesion that counteracts see the divergence of society. The Conservative Party believes in the stabilising of premium costs in the healthcare sector, by creating a system where the state helps those who are in need of help but ultimately have those who can, to pay; and, combating the abuse of social welfare systems, believing strongly that state welfare to be 'temporary measure in restoring citizens to a position where they can help themselves' and not a lifelong solution. The Conservative Party is generally supportive a multicultural society believing that immigration does lead to great contributions in society, but contends that unfettered immigration can lead to social instability and pressure on public services.
    Key election promises: The introduction of the Balder Freedom of Movement Agreement (allowing visa free access to Genovia-Karlsruhe); negotiation of multi-regional defence pact; implement the Rustamov Report, which recommended the introduction of a single-payer healthcare system in lieu of the current National Health Service model; supports additional devolution to the existing provinces but opposes the creation of a 'French Community'; continued membership of the World Assembly, though an estimated 50% of the elected representatives opposes membership; Maintain the highest band of income tax at 40% and reduce the corporate tax rate from 30% to 27.5%; legislate that companies must advertise job openings locally for 90 days before they may advertise said jobs regionally; supports full privatization of the state owned broadcaster and thus abolishing the licensing fee; strengthening restrictions on asylum seekers and immigrants namely language skills; supportive of same sex marriage and adoption by same sex couple, but believes the ban the blood donation by homosexuals should be reviewed.

Labour Party (centre-left to left)

    Foreign policy: supports participation by Genovia-Karlsruhe in international organizations and regional cooperation. The Labour Party supports increased international efforts on the part of Genovia-Karlsruhe in the areas of peace keeping and human rights and supports the maintenance of current levels of military spending but believe that military training exercises with allies should be scaled back. Does support military neutrality.
    Economic policy: rejects policies of economic liberalization such as deregulation, lowering taxes for high-income citizens, and decreases in government spending on social insurance. The Labour Party opposes raising the retirement age and believes it should be lowered and equalised (same retirement age for men and women). In tax policy, the Labour Party opposes the notion of lowering taxes for high-income citizens. The Labour Party believes that the workers should have representatives sit on the supervisory/management boards of companies with 2000 employees or more; supports the the implementation of an energy transition plan towards a target of 100% renewable energy by the next thirty years.
    Social policy: committed to social equity and an open society, thus aims at making working conditions for women in families easier by promoting more external childcare centers and more opportunities for part-time jobs. It also aims at reinforcing sexual equality in terms of eliminating wage differences based on gender, supports civil union for homosexuals and takes an easier stance toward abortions. The Labour Party is mildly supportive of Conservative policy to strengthening restrictions on asylum seekers and immigrants, believing that that unfettered immigration will only result in the decline of wages, working conditions and opportunities for local skilled workers.
    Key election promises: Increased welfare spending, including the introduction of the 'baby box' (package contains children's clothes and other necessary items for one year for all newborns); introduction of mandatory language and skills training for all secondary students and the expansion of the Further and Technical Education College network; supports strengthening restrictions on asylum seekers and immigrants, especially skilled migrants; increasing the income tax rate from 40% to 45% for those earning more than 300,000 pounds and 50% for those earning more than 375,000 pounds; supports the gradual phasing out of nuclear energy from the national energy mix; opposes the creation of a 'French Community' but supports increased devolution to the existing provinces; legislate for the creation of a two board corporate management structure, with worker-representatives amounting for one-third of the supervisory boards; mandate that supervisory boards vote on executive pay; lift the ban on blood donations by homosexuals.

Christian Democratic Party (right)

    Foreign policy: opposes further participation by Genovia-Karlsruhe in international organizations and but endorses increased regional cooperation albeit that the region is in immediate need for democratic reform. The Christian Democratic Party supports increased international efforts on the part of Genovia-Karlsruhe in the areas of peace keeping and human rights and believes that increased military spending and continued military training exercises with allies will ultimately help in achieving those goals. The Christian Democratic Party is vehemently opposed the policy of military neutrality and, in fact, supports the reintroduction of conscription of all citizens aged 18 to 24 years.
    Economic policy: advocates for policies of economic liberalization such as deregulation, lowering taxes for high-income citizens, and decreases in government spending on social insurance. Additionally, the Christian Democratic supports exporting industries, more spending on education, research and development. It also aims at combating the black market and tax evasion. In order to increase efficiency and incentives, the Christian Democratic Party calls for the reduction and streamlining of bureaucratic procedures and government agencies, low taxation for family enterprises and those who offer vocational education and internships. The party supports the raising taxes on demerit goods (e.g. tobacco taxes) to generate more revenues for the pension funds. The retirement age of 65 should also be upheld
    Social policy: rejects further expansion of the welfare state, and stands for a conservative society. It opposes the legalisation of same sex marriage, blood donation by homosexuals; the party has however supported civil partnership and has indicated some support for adoption of children by homosexual couples. In its education policy, it opposes tendencies to shift the responsibility of the upbringing of children from families to public institutions. The party claims an excessive influence of atheist/secularist ideas which have resulted in the gradual diminishing of moral values with our schools and wider society. In general, the party supports strengthening crime prevention measures against social crimes and, especially in the areas of social welfare policy and education policy, a return to meritocracy. The party supports stronger rules on immigration.
    Key election promises: opposes the legalisation of same sex marriage, the lifting on the prohibition of the donation of blood by 'men who sleep with men'; the reintroduction of religious education at the secondary education level; supports in principle the the introduction of the 'baby box' (package contains children's clothes and other necessary items for one year for all newborns); opposes the introduction the two tiered board structure (the management board and the supervisory board) for public and private corporations employing more the 2,000 employees, with one-third of supervisory boards being employee or union representatives; supports continued use of nuclear energy in the current energy mix and opposes any changes to the energy market; legislate that companies must advertise job openings locally for 90 days before they may advertise said jobs regionally; opposes state ownership of industry but in favour of retaining state broadcaster; support the reintroduction of conscription; sympathetic to the creation of a 'French Community' (since the vast majority of the party's base is francophonic Genovians).

Moderate Party (centre)

    Foreign policy: Supports further regional cooperation and the introduction of the Balder Freedom of Movement Agreement (allowing visa free access to Genovia-Karlsruhe); supports the maintenance of current levels of military spending but opposes continued military training exercises with allies and embraces the policy of neutrality; supports membership of the World Assembly.
    Economic policy: believes that that private markets are the most effective allocation mechanism for resources, but that output would maximized through sound state macroeconomic management of the economy. The Moderate opposes raising the retirement age. The Moderate Party opposes the policy of lowering taxes for high-income citizens and does not support the nationalisation of private enterprises
    Social policy: believes in the creation of a 'equal society' and that the government should actively work to resolve the social ills of the nation. The Moderate Party holds an official policy of secularism, believing that the state and the church must remain separate in order to reduce religious persecution as was fraught during the last century. The party however recognises the value and role of faith in the lives of many Genovians (willing to find compromise to the reintroduction of compulsory religious education in secondary schools). The Moderates hold a pro-immigration stance and believes the government must do more to integrate these new arrivals to the country. The party opposes the creation of a 'French Community' believing the devolution of power on the basis of identity will ultimately prove divisive and destructive to the country's future.
    Key election promises: supports the introduction of the Balder Freedom of Movement Agreement (allowing visa free access to Genovia-Karlsruhe); commission further review of the Rustamov Report, which recommended the introduction of a single-payer healthcare system in lieu of the current National Health Service model; supports additional devolution to the existing provinces but opposes the creation of a 'French Community'; supports continued membership of the World Assembly, legislation which will allow for the adoption of children by same sex couples and lifting the ban on blood donations by homosexuals; maintain the highest band of income tax at 40% but oppose plans to reduce the corporate tax rate from 30% to 27.5%; oppose the reintroduction of religious education in state funded secondary schools and the reintroduction of conscription.

Greens Party (left)

    Foreign (inc. Defence) policy: Supports further regional cooperation and the introduction of the Balder Freedom of Movement Agreement (allowing visa free access to Genovia-Karlsruhe); opposes an assertive defence policy, the maintenance of current levels of military spending but opposes continued military training exercises with allies; supports membership of the World Assembly.
    Economic (inc. Energy) policy: Supports the introduction the two tiered board structure (the management board and the supervisory board) for public and private corporations employing more the 2,000 employees, with one-third of supervisory boards being employee or union representatives; opposes continued use of nuclear energy in the current energy mix and supports the nationalisation to the energy market; supports paid internships.
    Social (inc. Education) policy: Supports the legalisation of same sex marriage, the lifting on the prohibition of the donation of blood by 'men who sleep with men' and abortion; the reintroduction of religious education at the secondary education level; supports in principle the the introduction of the 'baby box' (package contains children's clothes and other necessary items for one year for all newborns); mostly neutral on the reintroduction of religious education at the secondary school level; opposes any attempts to restrict immigration.
    Previous coalition partners: Social Democratic and Liberal Party, Labour Party and Socialist Party

National Democratic Party (far-right)

    Foreign policy: vehemently opposes further regional cooperation and membership of the World Assembly; supports an assertive defence policy, the maintenance of current levels of military spending and continued military training exercises with allies; supports a cap reduction on immigration (regional and international).
    Economic policy: Supports legislation mandating that public works projects must employ a 3:2 ratio of local staff to foreign labour on all publicly funded projects, that employers must advertise job vacancies locally for a period of 120 days before same can be advertised internationally, supports lowering taxes and free trade to facilitate growth in the economy, supports the continued usage of nuclear energy
    Social policy: endorse a law-and-order platform of zero tolerance, harsher sentencing, increased prison capacity, and a referendum on re-introducing the death penalty; opposes tendencies to shift the responsibility of the upbringing of children from families to public institutions. The party believes that multiculturalism is contributing to the decline of Genovian society and culture, and that future immigrants should not only comply with 'Genovian values' but also have sufficient language (English, French or German) skills.
    Previous coalition partners:

Socialist Party (far-left)

    Foreign (inc. Defence) policy: vehemently opposes further regional cooperation and the introduction of the Balder Freedom of Movement Agreement (allowing visa free access to Genovia-Karlsruhe); opposes an assertive defence policy, the maintenance of current levels of military spending and continued military training exercises with allies; opposes membership of the World Assembly.
    Economic (inc. Energy) policy: Supports the introduction the two tiered board structure (the management board and the supervisory board) for public and private corporations employing more the 2,000 employees, with half of supervisory boards being employee or union representatives; supports continued use of nuclear energy in the current energy mix and supports the nationalisation to the energy market; support state ownership (51% shares in all companies) of other key industries; mandate that public works projects must employ a 3:2 ratio of local staff to foreign labour on all publicly funded projects.
    Social (inc. Education) policy: Neutral towards the legalisation of same sex marriage, the lifting on the prohibition of the donation of blood by 'men who sleep with men' and abortion; opposes the reintroduction of religious education at the secondary education level and supports its removal from public education; supports the the introduction of the 'baby box' (package contains children's clothes and other necessary items for one year for all newborns); supports the imposition of stronger controls on immigration, particularly on language skills.
    Previous coalition partners: Labour Party, most members are not keen on supporting a SDLP-Labour coalition believing Braeden leans too much to the right economically.

Option Réformateur (Reform Option) (centrist)

    Foreign policy: No official policy.
    Economic (inc. Energy) policy: Formation of a 'French Community' with the devolution of powers on taxation and social services from the federal and provincial governments to a devolved government; supports the formation of a French Community owned energy company; supports in principle that public works projects must employ a 3:2 ratio of local staff to foreign labour on all publicly funded projects.
    Social (inc. Education) policy: Supports the the introduction of the 'baby box' (package contains children's clothes and other necessary items for one year for all newborns); supports the imposition of stronger controls on immigration, particularly on language skills namely French; supports the creation of a French Community specific immigration agency and visa.

Independents

    Foreign (inc. Defence) policy: Party profile: 30% leans left, 30% centre (can be swayed) and 40% leans right.
    Economic (inc. Energy) policy: Party Profile: 20% leans left, 20% centre (can be swayed) and 60% leans right.
    Social (inc. Education) policy: Party Profile: 40% leans left, 50% centre (can be swayed) and 10% leans right.
Read factbook


Current Cabinet - Second Roché-Thériault Ministry
(Cabinet actuel - Deuxième Roché-Thériault ministère;
Aktuelle Cabinet - Zweite Roche-Thériault Ministerium
)

    Prime Minister
    (Premier ministre; Ministerpräsident)
    Federal Minister for the Civil Service
    (Ministre fédéral de la Fonction Publique; Bundesminister für den Öffentlicher Dienst):
    Frederic Roché-Thériault

    Deputy Prime Minister
    (Vice-Premier Ministre; Stellvertretende Ministerpräsident)
    Federal Minister of the Economy, Finance and Strategy
    (Ministre fédéral des l'Economie, Finances et Stratégie;
    Bundesminister für Wirtschaft, Finanzen und Strategie
    ):
    Graeme Russell

    Federal Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Development
    (Ministre fédéral des Affaires Etrangères et du Développement International;
    Bundesminister für Auswärtige Angelegenheiten und Internationalen Entwicklungs
    ):
    Albert Gössi

    Federal Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Management
    (Ministre fédéral de Sécurité publique et Gestion des urgences;
    Bundesminister des Öffentliche Sicherheit und Notfallmanagement
    ):
    Christian Lüscher

    Federal Minister of National Defence
    (Ministre fédéral de la Défense national; Bundesminister der Nationale Verteidigung):
    Maj. Madeleine de Courten

    Federal Minister of International Trade, Industry and Entrepreneurship
    (Ministre fédéral du Commerce international, l'Industrie et l'Entrepreneuriat;
    Bundesminister für Internationaler Handel, Industrie und Unternehmertum
    ):
    Pierre-Alain Freysinger

    Federal Minister of Employment, Productivity and Skills Development
    (Ministre fédéral de l'Emploi, Productivité et Développement des compétences;
    Bundesminister für Beschäftigung, Produktivität und Qualifizierung
    ):
    Marianne van der Pol

    Federal Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development
    (Ministre fédéral de la Justice et du Développement Constitutionnel;
    Bundesminister für Justiz und Verfassungsentwicklung
    ):
    Alexandra Hardinge

    Federal Minister of Infrastructure, Communications, Energy and Transport
    (Ministre fédéral de Infrastructure, Communications, Energie et Transport;
    Bundesminister für Infrastruktur, Kommunikation, Energie und Verkehr
    ):
    Nathaniel Spreitler

    Federal Minister of Education and Research
    (Ministre fédéral de l'Education et Recherche;
    Bundesministerin für Bildung und Forschung]
    ):
    Caroline Tornare

    Federal Minister of Health
    (Ministre fédéral de la Santé; Bundesministerin für Gesundheit):
    Dr. Claudia Fehr

    Federal Minister of Social Development, Families and Welfare
    (Ministre fédéral pour le Développement Social, Familles et Aide Sociale
    Bundesminister für Soziale Entwicklung, Familien und Wohlfahrt
    ):
    Helena Rollins

    Federal Minister of Agriculture, the Environment and Natural Resources
    (Ministre fédéral de l'Agriculture, Environnement et Ressources Naturelles;
    Bundesminister für Landwirtschaft, Umwelt und natürliche Ressourcen
    ):
    Catherine Blackburn

    Federal Minister for Immigration and Citizenship
    (Ministre fédéral de l'Immigration et de la Citoyenneté;
    Bundesminister für Einwanderung und Staatsbürgerschaft
    ):
    Sebastian Wersching

    Federal Associate Minister for Government Policy and Institutional Reform
    (Associés-ministres fédéral pour la Politique gouvernementale et Réforme Institutionnelle;
    Mitarbeiterin Bundesminister für Regierungspolitik und Institutionelle Reform
    ):
    Susanne Landolt

    Federal Deputy Minister for the Budget and Financial Programming
    (Sous-ministre fédéral pour au Budget et Programmation Financière;
    Stellvertretende Bundesminister für die Finanzplanung und Haushalt
    ):
    Wolfgang Rösler

    Federal Deputy Minister for Climate Change, Nuclear Safety and Sustainable Development
    (Sous-ministre fédéral pour le Changement climatique, la Sécurité nucléaire et le Développement durable;
    Stellvertretende Bundesminister für Klimawandel, nukleare Sicherheit und nachhaltige Entwicklung
    )
    Theresia Krestchmann

    Federal Associate Minister for Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy
    (Associés-ministres fédéral pour Large bande, Communications et l'économie numérique;
    Mitarbeiterin Bundesminister für Breitband, Kommunikation und digitale Wirtschaft
    ):
    Tatiana Reimann

    Federal Associate Minister for Culture, Media, Sport and Tourism
    (Associés-ministre fédéral de la Culture, Médias, Sports et Tourisme
    Mitarbeiterin Bundesminister für Kultur, Medien, Sport und Tourismus
    ):
    Dr. Lucas Moser

    Federal Associate Minister for Regional Cooperation
    (Associés-ministre fédéral de la Coopération régionale; Mitarbeiterin Bundesminister für Regionale Kooperation):
    Theodore Brownlee

Read factbook

We hope these help.

Sincerely

just WOW

Yay for polls! Pepernoten, the poll revolution is spreading!

WA members go to the GA assembly forum and tell me what you think about the Alien information act.

Me, I love aliens. I'm an alien my owngoddamnself, baby. High 5.

Genovia-Karlsruhe, I think an SDLP-LP-GP coalition could be reached without too much fuss. That leaves the coalition 38 seats short of majority. At this point, the coalition needs two parties among the SP, MP, or RO. I think the coalition should go for the RO & MP first, as the SP seems to be a particularly troublesome potential coalition partner. Are there any firm views one way or another on a French Community outside the National Democrats & Reformists? If not, I think the RO would probably be fairly easy partners to get. That said, what of the left-centre-right split in the RO? Firstly, what are the actual percentages? (It currently sums to 110%.) Secondly, does this mean that the right-wing Reformists won't support a SDLP-LP-GP-RO-MP/SP coalition? I assume the coalition could get centrist support & certainly leftist support in exchange for some concessions on a French Community, but only if the other coalition members don't oppose it. Speaking of concessions on Reformist policy priorities, are those the ones which are crossed out? Does the fact that the policies are crossed out mean anything? Also, on the possibility of Moderates entering government, how firm is this promise, really? Is it actually off the table, or could they be bought for the right price? I'm thinking, specifically, of Martin Schulz, and how he initially firmly opposed a coalition with the Christian Democrats of Germany but eventually relented when it became apparent it was the only possible government coalition available. Also, what's the Green position on the reintroduction of religious education in secondary schools? There are two contradictory remarks in their profile.

Thanks for all this. This is quite interesting to me.

Alta Italia wrote:Genovia-Karlsruhe, I think an SDLP-LP-GP coalition could be reached without too much fuss. That leaves the coalition 38 seats short of majority. At this point, the coalition needs two parties among the SP, MP, or RO. I think the coalition should go for the RO & MP first, as the SP seems to be a particularly troublesome potential coalition partner. Are there any firm views one way or another on a French Community outside the National Democrats & Reformists? If not, I think the RO would probably be fairly easy partners to get. That said, what of the left-centre-right split in the RO? Firstly, what are the actual percentages? (It currently sums to 110%.) Secondly, does this mean that the right-wing Reformists won't support a SDLP-LP-GP-RO-MP/SP coalition? I assume the coalition could get centrist support & certainly leftist support in exchange for some concessions on a French Community, but only if the other coalition members don't oppose it. Speaking of concessions on Reformist policy priorities, are those the ones which are crossed out? Does the fact that the policies are crossed out mean anything? Also, on the possibility of Moderates entering government, how firm is this promise, really? Is it actually off the table, or could they be bought for the right price? I'm thinking, specifically, of Martin Schulz, and how he initially firmly opposed a coalition with the Christian Democrats of Germany but eventually relented when it became apparent it was the only possible government coalition available. Also, what's the Green position on the reintroduction of religious education in secondary schools? There are two contradictory remarks in their profile.

Thanks for all this. This is quite interesting to me.

Can we say how much we are loving the enthusiasm; it is very rare to find someone in the community who shares our passion for coalition building and the sort. Note, we are making revisions to the profiles now as we noticed the errors and contradictions upon review today. We were rushing late last night, so somethings went overlooked.

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