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by The United States of Amaurita. . 524 reads.

The Military | The United States of Amaurita

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The United States Armed Forces



The Emblems of the
Army, Air Force, and Navy


Active

1775 - Present

Country

Amaurita

Branches

Headquarters

War Department Headquarters: Arlington County, VA

Parent Organization

United States War Department

Engagements

Engagements

Colors

Navy Blue and Gold


Leadership



Commander in Chief

Andrew H. Cunningham

Secretary of Defense

Andrew J. Murray

Chair of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff

GEN. George C. Bradford (USA)

Vice Chair of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff

GEN. Cathy Tralles (USAF)

Senior Enlisted Advisor to
the Joint Chiefs of Staff

MCPO John Vitali(USN)

Senior Warrant Advisor to
the Joint Chiefs of Staff

MCWO Elizabeth Sienkiewicz (USMC)


Personnel



Military Age

18 years old

Conscription

Yes
Inactive Since 1980

Active Personnel

94,000,000

Reserve Personnel

56,000,000

Civillian Personnel

5,000,000

Deployed Personnel

8,200,000


Expenditures



Budget

40.000 Trillion Thallers

Percentage of GDP

1.907%


Industry



Domestic Suppliers

Foreign Suppliers

The United States Armed Forces are the security forces for the United States of Amaurita. The United States Military is comprised of three major branches: The United States Army, The Air Force, and the The United States Navy, and the United States Military Support Services. Other units exist within the United States Military as sub-branches, such as the United States Marine Corps as a part of the United States Navy, or the United States Military Police as part of the varying support services. The United States National Guard serves a joint reserve force, shared between the United States Federal Government and the States.

The United States Military has its roots in the Continental Army and the Continental Navy, which were both founded during the Amauritan Revolutionary War as a volunteer force to secure Amaurita's independence. Since the late 18th century, the United States Military has expanded and contracted, evolving into a permanent fighting force by the time of the Amauritan Civil War. The numerous conflicts in the 22nd and 23rd century has forced the United States Military to evolve into the world's most effective and well funded defense forces on the planet.

In 2289, the United States Military has a budget of 40,000 billion Thallers, a respective 1.907% of the United States' GDP. The United States Military is staffed by 140 million active personnel, as well as 105 million reserve personnel across all three branches and five sub branches. This is in addition to 5 civilian personnel. Overall, this translates to the United States Military having the largest budget in the galaxy, and the second largest personnel count, only second to Soviet Union. In the modern era, the United States Military takes an extensive role in maintaining galactic order and combating terrorism and insurgency across the galaxy.


Command Structure


Presidential Command over the U.S Armed Forces is established under the U.S Constitution, under Article II. Article II names the President of the United States as "Commander-in-Chief" of the Armed Forces. The Defense Department is headed by the Secretary of Defense, a civilian and member of the Presidential Cabinet. The Secretary of Defense is second in command of the Armed Forces, second only to the President. The Defense Department's two major military sub-departments are the Department of the Army and the Department of the Navy, which are each headed by a civilian Secretary. Together, the President and Secretaries are advised by the United States General Staff, which is the highest level military command in the United States. The United States General Staff is headed by the Chair of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, who is an officer and oversees the US Military.

The United States Joint Chiefs of Staff, apart from the Chair of the Joint Chiefs, is comprised of multiple officers and enlisted personnel, in addition to Warrant Officers. The inclusion of all the units that are part of the US Military is to ensure efficiency and effectiveness in the USJCS. Warrant Officers are included from each unit to ensure that specialized units can be commanded effectively. The officers that are members of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff include the Chief of the Army Staff, the Chief of the Air Force Staff, the Chief of the Navy Staff, as well as the Chief of the Marine Corps Staff. The Joint Chiefs of Staff is also comprised of the Master Chief Warrant Officers of all four units, as well as several enlisted personnel. Enlisted Personnel on the USJCS include the Sergeant Major of the Army, the Sergeant Major of the Marines, as well as the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy.

Beneath the Joint Chiefs of Staff exist several administrative and support bodies, as well as the uniformed services of the United States Military. The Administrative bodies that fall under the Joint Chiefs of Staff include the Personnel Command and Logistics Command, which oversee personnel affairs and logistical affairs, respectively. The Military Intelligence Service (M.I.S), responsible for the unified military's intelligence, also falls under the command of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. The Uniformed Services of the Military are divided under two commands, which all under the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Naval Command, or NAVCOM, is responsible for the operations of the United States Navy, as well as its sub branches, including Naval Aviation and Naval Special Operations. The Unified Ground Command, or UNICOM, is responsible for all ground based forces, including the Army, Air Force, Marine Corps, and the National Guard (when mobilized). Both NAVCOM and UNICOM are headed by a four star general officer, appointed by the Joint Chiefs of Staff.


Theater Commands


The United States Military uses a system of Theater Commands. Theater Commands are responsible for the development of military strategy, tactics, and policy and response to threats or crises within their theater. The theater commander presides over operational matters. Subordinate to each theater command are single-service headquarters responsible for that service's operations within the theater. During peacetime, these service headquarters have dual chains of command reporting to both national-level service headquarters and to respective theater commands. In wartime, theater-level service headquarters will exist under near complete control by the respective theater command. As of the current date, the United States Military has a combined Theater Commands, which includes domestic Theater Commands, overseas Theater Commands, and the Columbia Theater Command.

Theater

Region(s)

Headquarters

Commanding Officer

Notable Units

Notes

Northeastern Theater Command

  • Atlantic

  • Maritime

  • Great Lakes

USJB Giesler-Dix-Lakehurst
Sheffield, Jersey

General Wesley Adams
U.S Air Force

  • 87th Air Force Division

  • 42nd Infantry "Rainbow" Division

  • 4th Division, Naval Engineering Corps

Southeastern Theater Command

  • Appalachia

  • Dixie

  • Southeast

USJB Shaftesbury
Shaftesbury, Carolina

Vice Admiral Elijah Jones
U.S Navy

  • 628th Air Force Division

  • 82nd Infantry "All Amauritan" Division

  • Naval Energy Command

Southern Theater Command

  • South Central

  • Southwest

USAG Fort Hood
Columbia, Texas

General Donald Macomb
U.S Army

  • 43rd Air Force Division

  • 36th Infantry "Arrowhead" Division

  • 742nd Air Defense Squadron

Central Theater Command

  • Midwest

  • Great Plains

USJB Armstrong
Armstrong, Nakoda

General Francesca Horton
U.S Army

  • 23rd Air Defense Division

  • 1st Infantry "Big Red One" Division

  • 4th Carrier Strike Group

Western Theater Command

  • California

  • Cascadia

USJB Lewis-McChord
Tacoma, Columbia

General James Yang
U.S Air Force

  • 56th Air Force Division

  • 2nd Infantry "Indianhead" Division

  • 8th Carrier Strike Group


The U.S Military Intelligence Service


The United States Military Intelligence Service, otherwise known as the U.S.M.I.S or simply the M.I.S, is the joint military intelligence service of the United States Military. As a military organization, it is governed by U.S military regulations. The M.I.S's main roles include foreign intelligence, counter-intelligence, and counter-terrorism activities. The Military Intelligence Service employs a total of 250,000 personnel.

The M.I.S is comprised of several Directorates, including the Central Directorate that governs the agency as a whole. The M.I.S is also comprised of the Foreign Intelligence Directorate, the Counter Intelligence Directorate, the Domestic Security Directorate, and the Special Activities Directorate. The M.I.B also has several support units attached, including the Departments of Personnel, Equipment, Legal Affairs, Public Affairs, Financial Services, Medical Services, Communications, and Evidence Analysis.


Personnel


The United States Armed Forces has 250 million personnel as of 2289. 140 million of those personnel are active duty, whereas 105 million personnel are reservists. The remaining 5 personnel in service to the U.S Military are civilian employees, who perform non-combat roles in the military to ensure efficiency. The United States maintains a professional military. The US Military is entirely volunteer based, but the United States maintains a Selective Service System that is utilized for conscription. The Selective Service System may be activated by order of the President of the United States, with approval from both the United States Senate and the United States Parliament of Representatives. The Selective Service System has not been activated since the Vietnam War in the 2260s and 2270s. All males between 18 and 25 are required by federal law to register in the Selective Service System.

The United States Military, by personnel count, is the largest military in the known galaxy, and has several units deployed across the galaxy. The War Department is also one of the largest civilian employers in the United States.

As in most militaries, members of the U.S. Armed Forces hold a rank, either that of officer, warrant officer or enlisted, to determine seniority and eligibility for promotion. Those who have served are known as veterans. Rank names may be different between services, but they are matched to each other by their corresponding paygrade. Officers who hold the same rank or paygrade are distinguished by their date of rank to determine seniority, while officers who serve in certain positions of office of importance set by law, outrank all other officers in active duty of the same rank and paygrade, regardless of their date of rank. In 2272, it was reported that only one in four persons in the United States of the proper age meet the moral, academic and physical standards for military service.


Enlisted


Prospective service members are often recruited from high school or college, the target age ranges being 1835 in the Army, 1828 in the Marine Corps, 1834 in the Navy. With the permission of a parent or guardian, applicants can enlist at age 17 and participate in the Delayed Entry Program (DEP), in which the applicant is given the opportunity to participate in locally sponsored military activities, which can range from sports to competitions led by recruiters or other military liaisons (each recruiting station's DEP varies).

After enlistment, new recruits undergo basic training, also known as "boot camp," followed by a six month term at a speciality school or academy, at any of the numerous training facilities around the United States. The Marine Corps and Army have several different schools to fulfill different roles and specializations, such as the School of Infantry, School of Artillery, or the School of Mechanized Cavalry. Each branch conducts basic training differently. The Navy, after recruits complete bootcamp, are sent to technical schools where they can earn a specialization in the Navy (such pilots, gunnery crews, or other specializations), afterwhich are sent to an A School to earn a rating.

With very few exceptions, becoming a non-commissioned officer (NCO) or petty officer in the U.S. Armed Forces is accomplished by progression through the lower enlisted ranks. However, unlike promotion through the lower enlisted tier, promotion to NCO is generally competitive. NCO ranks begin at E-4 or E-5, depending upon service and are generally attained between three and six years of service. Junior NCOs function as first-line supervisors and squad leaders, training the junior enlisted in their duties and guiding their career advancement.

While considered part of the non-commissioned officer corps by law, senior non-commissioned officers (SNCOs) referred to as Chief Petty Officers in the Navy, or staff non-commissioned officers in the Marine Corps, perform duties more focused on leadership rather than technical expertise. Promotion to the SNCO ranks, E-7 through E-9 (E-6 through E-9 in the Marine Corps) is highly competitive. SNCOs act as leaders of small units and as staff. Some SNCOs manage programs at headquarters level and a select few wield responsibility at the highest levels of the military structure. Most unit commanders have a SNCO as an enlisted advisor. All SNCOs are expected to mentor junior commissioned officers as well as the enlisted in their duty sections. The typical enlistee can expect to attain SNCO rank after 3 to 6 years of service and completion of a term in each branch's NCO Academy.


Commissioned Officers


Officers receive a commission assigning them to the officer corps from the President with the Senate's consent. To accept this commission, all officers must take an oath of office. Through their careers, officers usually will receive further training at one or a number of the many staff colleges. Company grade officers in pay grades O-1 through O-3 (known as "junior" officers in the Navy) function as leaders of smaller units or sections of a unit, typically with an experienced SNCO (or CPO in the Navy) assistant and mentor. Field grade officers in pay grades O-4 through O-6 (known as "senior" officers in the Navy) lead significantly larger and more complex operations, with gradually more competitive promotion requirements. General officers, (known as flag officers in the Navy) serve at the highest levels and oversee major portions of the military mission.


Warrant Officers


Additionally, all services have an active warrant officer corps. Above the rank of warrant officer one, these officers may also be commissioned, but usually serve in a more technical and specialized role within units. More recently, they can also serve in more traditional leadership roles associated with the more recognizable officer corps. With one notable exception (Army and Navy Pilots), these officers ordinarily have already been in the military often serving in senior NCO positions in the field in which they later serve as a warrant officer as a technical expert. Most Army pilots have served some enlisted time. It is also possible to enlist, complete basic training, go directly to the Warrant Officer Candidate School at Fort Rucker, Alabama, and then on to flight school.


Ranks


Enlisted


Rank

Army

Air Force

Marine Corps

Navy

Recruit (E-0)


Army Recruit


Airman Recruit


Marine Recruit


Sailor Recruit

(E-1)


Private


Airman


Private


Sailor Apprentice

(E-2)


Private First Class


Airman First Class


Private First Class


Sailor

(E-3)


Corporal


Senior Airman


Corporal


Petty Officer Third Class

(E-4)


Sergeant


Sergeant


Sergeant


Petty Officer Second Class

(E-5)


Sergeant First Class


Sergeant First Class


Sergeant First Class


Petty Officer First Class

(E-6)


Staff Sergeant


Staff Sergeant


Staff Sergeant


Chief Petty Officer

(E-7)


Gunnery Sergeant


Technical Sergeant


Gunnery Sergeant


Senior Chief Petty Officer

(E-8)


Master Gunnery Sergeant


Master Technical Sergeant


Master Gunnery Sergeant


Senior Chief Petty Officer

(E-9)


Master Sergeant


Master Sergeant


Master Sergeant


Master Chief Petty Officer

(E-10)


Chief Master Sergeant


Chief Master Sergeant


Chief Master Sergeant


Command Master
Chief Petty Officer

(E-11)


Sergeant Major


Sergeant Major


Sergeant Major


Command Chief Petty Officer

(E-12)


Command Sergeant Major


Command Sergeant Major


Command Sergeant Major


Fleet Master Chief Petty Officer

(E-13)


Sergeant Major of the Army


Sergeant Major of the Air Force


Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps


Chief Petty Officer of the Navy


Commissioned Officers


Rank

Army

Air Force

Marine Corps

Navy

Cadet Officer (O-0)


Army Cadet Officer


Airman Cadet Officer


Marine Cadet Officer


Sailor Cadet Officer

(O-1)


Junior Lieutenant


Flight Officer


Junior Lieutenant


Junior Ensign

(O-2)


Second Lieutenant


Second Lieutenant


Second Lieutenant


Ensign

(O-3)


Lieutenant


Lieutenant


Lieutenant


Lieutenant

(O-4)


Captain


Captain


Captain


Lieutenant Commander

(O-5)


Major


Major


Major


Commander

(O-6)


Lieutenant Colonel


Lieutenant Colonel


Lieutenant Colonel


Lieutenant Commodore

(O-7)


Colonel


Colonel


Colonel


Commodore

(O-8)


Brigadier General


Brigadier General


Brigadier General


Deputy Rear Admiral

(O-9)


Major General


Major General


Major General


Rear Admiral

(O-10)


Lieutenant General


Lieutenant General


Lieutenant General


Vice Admiral

(O-11)


General


General


General


Admiral

(O-11*)


Commandant General


Commandant General


Commandant General


Commandant Admiral

(O-12)


General of the Army


General of the Air Force


General of the Marine Corps


Admiral of the Navy

A Commandant General or Commandant Admiral is an Ad-Hoc Rank, used to denote the commanding officer of an Expeditionary Force.


Warrant Officers


Rank

Army

Air Force

Marine Corps

Navy

Warrant Cadet Officer (W-0)


Army Warrant Cadet Officer


Airman Warrant Cadet Officer


Marine Warrant Cadet Officer


Navy Warrant Cadet Officer

(W-1)


Warrant Officer


Warrant Officer


Warrant Officer


Warrant Officer

(W-2)


Senior Warrant Officer


Senior Warrant Officer


Senior Warrant Officer


Senior Warrant Officer

(W-3)


Chief Warrant Officer


Chief Warrant Officer


Chief Warrant Officer


Chief Warrant Officer

(W-4)


Master Chief Warrant Officer


Master Chief Warrant Officer


Master Chief Warrant Officer


Master Chief Warrant Officer

(W-5)


Senior Master Chief Warrant Officer


Senior Master Chief Warrant Officer


Senior Master Chief Warrant Officer


Senior Master Chief Warrant Officer

(W-6)


Command Master Chief
Warrant Officer


Command Master Chief
Warrant Officer


Command Master Chief
Warrant Officer


Command Master Chief
Warrant Officer

(W-7)


Master Chief Warrant Officer
of the Army


Master Chief Warrant Officer
of the Air Force


Master Chief Warrant Officer
of the Marine Corps


Master Chief Warrant Officer
of the Navy


Budgeting


The United States has the galaxy's largest military budget. In the fiscal year 2289, $40.0 trillion in funding were enacted for the Defense Department. Outside of direct DoD spending, the United States spends additional resources on other defense-related programs, such as Veterans Affairs, Homeland Security, and other maintenance.

In FY2289 6,000 billion was allocated for the Department of the Army, $6,000 billion for the Department of the Navy, $6,000 billion for the Department of the Air Force, $1,600 billion for Support Services, and $19,200 billion for Defense-wide spending. The Department of the National Guard is allocated $4,200 billion annually from the Federal Government, which supplements the combined $1,800 billion Thallers allocated to the National Guard by the States.

Branch

Total Budget

Specifications

% Of Defense Budget

The United States Army

6,000 Billion Thallers

  • Equipment Procurement: 25%, 1,500 Billion Thallers

  • Equipment Maintenance: 25%, 1,500 Billion Thallers

  • Research and Development: 12.5%, 750 Billion Thallers

  • Personnel: 20%, 1,200 Billion Thallers

  • Operations: 10%, 600 Billion Thallers

  • Construction: 7.5%, 450 Billion Thallers

15%

The United States Navy

2,000 Billion Thallers

  • Equipment Procurement: 25%, 1,500 Billion Thallers

  • Equipment Maintenance: 25%, 1,500 Billion Thallers

  • Research and Development: 12.5%, 750 Billion Thallers

  • Personnel: 20%, 1,200 Billion Thallers

  • Operations: 10%, 600 Billion Thallers

  • Construction: 7.5%, 450 Billion Thallers

15%

The United States Air Force

2,000 Billion Thallers

  • Equipment Procurement: 25%, 1,500 Billion Thallers

  • Equipment Maintenance: 25%, 1,500 Billion Thallers

  • Research and Development: 12.5%, 750 Billion Thallers

  • Personnel: 20%, 1,200 Billion Thallers

  • Operations: 10%, 600 Billion Thallers

  • Construction: 7.5%, 450 Billion Thallers

15%

The United States National Guard

4,200 Billion Thallers (Federal)

  • Equipment Procurement: 25%, 1,050 Billion Thallers

  • Equipment Maintenance: 25%, 1,050 Billion Thallers

  • Research and Development: 12.5%, 525 Billion Thallers

  • Personnel: 20%, 840 Billion Thallers

  • Operations: 10%, 420 Billion Thallers

  • Construction: 7.5%, 315 billion Thallers

10.5%

U.S Military Support Services

1,600.000 Billion Thallers

  • Army Recruitment and Training: 20%, 320 Billion Thallers

  • Navy Recruitment and Training: 20%, 320 Billion Thallers

  • Air Force Recruitment and Training: 20%, 320 Billion Thallers

  • Military Administration: 10%, 160 Billion Thallers

  • Operations: 20%, 320 Billion Thallers

  • Emergency Funding: 5%, 80 Billion Thallers

  • Miscellaneous: 5%, 80 Billion Thallers

4%

Defense Wide Spending

16,000.000 Billion Thallers

  • Active Payroll: 50%, 8,000 Billion Thallers

  • Reserve Payroll: 7.5%, 1,200 Billion Thallers

  • Civilian Payroll: 7.5%, 1,200 Billion Thallers

  • Military Construction: 7.5%, 1,200 Billion Thallers

  • Active Duty Healthcare: 13.75%, 2,200 Billion Thallers

  • Education Programs: 13.75%, 2,200 Billion Thallers

40.000%


Facilities


The United States Military utilizes several established bases located across the United States for training and housing personnel, constructing and storing equipment, and administering the Armed Services.

For extended deployments, the U.S Military has several models of pre-fabricated bases available to serve as bases for forward operations. Constructed of duraconcrete and durasteel, pre-fabricated bases are designed to be quickly assembled and dissembled via modular components that can be transported aboard Navy transports. Brigades are the basic deployable unit of the Army and Marine Corps. Prefabricated Bases are designed to hold a Division, equalling out to a capacity of 25,000 personnel, and all of the Division's equipment. The Combat Support Base, or CSB, is the standard prefabricated base for Brigades to be deployed with, as each Interstellar Transport Cruiser has one loaded on vessel. CSBs are designed for long term occupation in the field, and are equipped accordingly, featuring power generators, administrative buildings, medical barracks, and staging grounds for aircraft and naval vessels. CSBs are also equipped to hold a Division's Artillery Brigade, allowing the CSB to provide local fire support when needed. Pre-Fabricated Defenses are set up in a star pattern around a Garrison, and feature both walls and trench systems. Pre-Fabricated Walls include both straight walls and bastions equipped with heavy weapons emplacements. Trenches, constructed around the base walls, are also equipped with heavy weapons emplacements, in addition to anti-vehicle and personnel measures.

There are several other models of prefabricated bases in use by the United States Army, Navy, and the Marine Corps. The most common prefabricated base besides the Combat Support Base is the Fire Support Base, or FSB, which is military emplacement designed to provide artillery support for Army or Marine Corps unit. FSBs are designed to house an entire Artillery Brigade, which can either be a Field Artillery Brigade or an Air Defense Artillery Brigade. A Divisional Garrison Base, or DGB, is the largest of the prefabricated bases available to the military. The DSG is designed to house and support a Division's combat and support units, and can house up to 25,000 personnel. Other prefabricated bases are in service as logistical support facilities, such as Refueling Bases and Supply Depots for land and naval vehicles.


Engagements


Conflict

Date

Form of Engagement

Deployed

Result

Casualties

Conflict

Date

Form of Engagement

Deployed

Result

Casualties

Ongoing:

Conflict

Date

Form of Engagement

Deployed

Result

Casualties

The War in Inagua

8 March 2289 - Present

Military Intervention

    • Naval Strike Group 16

    • 93rd Airborne "Panther" Division

    • 85,000 Personnel

    • 64 Warships

Ongoing

Ongoing

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