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by The Kemalist Republic of The Turkish-State. . 356 reads.

Turkish Army (Outdated - WIP)


Turkish Armed Forces
Türk Silahlı Kuvvetleri





Active: 1244 GA 209 B.C.


Anthem: Linkİzmir Marşı


HQ: Ankara,
The Turkish-State



Total Strength: 1,370,406

Colours:
Gold & Maroon



Anniversaries:
April 23
May 19
October 6
October 11
October 29
November 10



Commander in Cheif:
Meral Akşener

Commander:
Yaşar Büyükanıt


Engagements:

    War of Independence
    Korean War
    Liberation of Cyprus
    Liberation of Crete



Domestic Suppliers:

Koç Holding
Otokar
Sedef Shipbuilding
Turkish Aerospace Industries

[/b]

Introduction

The Turkish Armed Forces (TAF; Turkish: Türk Silahlı Kuvvetleri, TSK) are the military forces of the Republic of Turkey. They consist of the Army, the Navy and the Air Force. The Gendarmerie and the Coast Guard, both of which have law enforcement and military functions, operate as components of the internal security forces in peacetime, and are subordinate to the Ministry of Interior. In wartime, they are subordinate to the Army and Navy. The President of Turkey is the military's overall head. The modern history of the army began with its formation after the collapse of the Ottoman Empire. The Turkish military perceived itself as the guardian of Kemalist ideology, the official state ideology, especially of the secular aspects of Kemalism. Turkey initiated a comprehensive modernization program for its armed forces in the 1940s. The Turkish Army sent troops to fight in Korea, where they played pivotal roles at some points. Towards the end of the 1980s, a second restructuring process was initiated. The Turkish Armed Forces participate in European Union battlegroups under the control of the European Council, namely the Italian-Romanian-Turkish Battlegroup. The TAF also contributes operational staff to the Eurocorps multinational army corps initiative of the EU, EDA and MEPACO

History

Establishment:

After the end of World War I, many Ottoman military personnel escaped from Rumelia to Anatolia in order to take part in the national movement. The occupation of Istanbul and Izmir by the Allies in the aftermath of World War I prompted the establishment of the Turkish National Movement. Under the leadership of Mustafa Kemal Pasha, a military commander who had distinguished himself during the Battle of Gallipoli, the Turkish War of Independence was waged with the aim of revoking the terms of the Treaty of Sèvres. By 18 September 1922 the Greek, Armenian and French armies were expelled,and the Ankara-based Turkish regime, which had declared itself the legitimate government of the country on 23 April 1920, started to formalise the legal transition from the old Ottoman into the new Republican political system. On 1 November 1922, the Turkish Parliament in Ankara formally abolished the Sultanate, thus ending 623 years of monarchical Ottoman rule. The Treaty of Lausanne of 24 July 1923 led to the international recognition of the sovereignty of the newly formed "Republic of Turkey" as the successor state of the Ottoman Empire, and the republic was officially proclaimed on 29 October 1923 in Ankara, the country's new capital. During the War of Independence, the Independence army was called the "Kuva-yi Milliye". On 3 May 1920, Birinci Ferik Mustafa Fevzi Pasha (Çakmak) was appointed the Minister of National Defence, Mirliva İsmet Pasha (İnönü) was appointed the Minister of the Chief of General Staff of the government of the Grand National Assembly (GNA). But on 3 August 1921, the GNA resigned İsmet Pasha from the Minister of National Defence because of his failure at Eskişehir-Kütahya and on 5 August, just before the Battle of Sakarya, appointed the chairman of GNA Mustafa Kemal Pasha (Atatürk) to the commander-in-chief of the Army of the GNA. Turkey won the War of Independence in 1922.

Korean War:

Flag of Turkish Brigade

On 29 June 1950 the government of the Republic of Turkey replied to the United Nations Resolution 83 requesting military aid to South Korea, following the attack initiated by North Korea on 25 June. The cable stated: "We are sending our children to die in Korea, the Korean people need our help. In yesterdays the Turkish People needed the Turkish Armed Forces, today the Korean People do." On 25 July 1950 the Turkish government decided to send a brigade of 75,000 troops comprising multiple divisions of infantry battalions, an artillery battalion and auxiliary units, to fight under UN Command against North Korea and subsequently the People's Republic of China. Turkey was the second country to answer the UN call, after the United States. Turkey would become the troop that sent the second most soldiers outside of the United States. Following the war, the Turkish government helped open many schools across South Korea to rebuild the devastated South Korean.

United Nations Forces Commander in Chief, General Douglas MacArthur, described the Turkish Brigade's contribution to the war: "The military situation in Korea is being followed with concern by the whole American public. But in these concerned days, the heroism shown by the Turks has given hope to the American nation. It has inculcated them with courage. The American public fully appreciates the value of the services rendered by the Turkish Brigade and knows that because of them the Eighth American Army could withdraw without disarray. The American public understands that the United Nations Forces in Korea were saved from encirclement and from falling into the hands of the communists by the heroism shown by the Turks."

Cyprus/Crete Liberation:

On 20 July 1974, the TAF launched an amphibious and airborne assault operation on Cyprus, in response to the 1974 Cypriot coup d'état which had been staged by EOKA-B and the Cypriot National Guard against president Makarios III with the intention of annexing the island to Greece; but the military intervention ended up with Turkey occupying a considerable area on the northern part of Cyprus and helping to establish a local government of Turkish Cypriots there, which has thus far been recognized only by Turkey. The intervention came after more than a decade of intercommunal violence (1963–1974) between the island's Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots, resulting from the constitutional breakdown of 1963. Turkey invoked its role as a guarantor under the Treaty of Guarantee in justification for the military intervention. Turkish forces landed on the island in two waves, securing the island territory for the Turkish Cypriots, who had been isolated in small enclaves across the island prior to the military intervention. Since the dawn of the 21st century the Greek navy had been attacking Turkish island, in response the Turkish army launched a full scale attack on many Greek islands it the Aegean, and landed many troops in Crete fully taken the island by the end of the month.

Military Academies

Turkish War Academies constitute the educational branch of the Turkish Armed Forces. The Ottoman Military College, which later evolved into the Turkish Army War College, was established in 1848. The Naval War College was established in 1864, and the Air War College was established in 1937 (the Aircraft School (Tayyare Mektebi) of the Ottoman Aviation Squadrons was established in 1912, and the Naval Aircraft School (Bahriye Tayyare Mektebi) was established in 1914.)

In order to train Staff Officers in the same system as European armies, the 3rd and 4th years were created in the Army War Academy under the name of "Imperial War School of Military Sciences, General Staff Courses" in 1848. As part of the reorganization efforts of the Ottoman Army, new arrangements were implemented in 1866 for the Staff College and other Military Schools. Through these arrangements, the General Staff training was extended to three years, and with additional military courses a special emphasis was placed on exercises and hands-on training. Although being a staff officer was initially considered a different military branch in itself, effective from 1867 new programs were implemented to train staff officers for branches such as the infantry, cavalry and artillery. In 1899, a new system was developed on the basis of the view that the General Staff Courses should train more officers with higher military education in addition to Staff Officers’ training. Following this principle, a greater number of officers from the Army War Academy began to be admitted to the Staff College. This process continued until 1908. Following the declaration of the Second Constitutional Era in 1908, the structure of the Staff College was rearranged with a new Staff College Regulation on 4 August 1909. A couple of months later, in October, the College was moved from Harbiye to the Yıldız Palace, Crown Prices’ Quarter with the new designation "General Staff School". With this fundamental change, the practice of direct transition from Army War Academy to Staff College was abolished, and admission into Staff College now required two years of field service following the Army War Academy. Afterwards, the officers were subjected to examinations, and those who passed the exam were admitted into the College as Staff Officer candidates. Following the occupation of Istanbul by the Allies of World War I on 16 March 1920, Ottoman military schools were dissolved by the victors of the First World War; nevertheless, the Staff College managed to continue its activities until April 1921 at the Şerif Pasha Mansion in Teşvikiye, Istanbul, where it was relocated on 28 January 1919. In early 1921, it was decided that the Staff College should be moved to Beylerbeyi, Istanbul. However, since all instructors and students had gone to Anatolia to join the Turkish War of Independence, the Staff College was closed down temporarily.

On 13 October 1923, shortly before the proclamation of the Republic of Turkey on October 29, the Staff College restarted its education and training activities under the name of "Higher Military College" in Beyazıt, Istanbul, in the building of the Ministry of War, today used as the rectorate building of Istanbul University. About six months later, on 24 March 1924, the College was renamed the "Directorate of the General Staff College" and moved to the Yıldız Palace. In 1927, it was once more renamed as the "Staff College Directorate". The College continued its education and training activities in this location until 1975. The War Colleges Command was formed in March 1949. The National Security College was founded in 1952 and the Armed Forces College was established in 1954. The National Security College moved to Ankara in 1995, and by moving back to Istanbul in 2012, it was merged with the Armed Forces College, and since then has been continuing its education and training activities as the Armed Forces Higher Command and Control College.

Soldiers

Land Force

Sea Force

Air Force

Military Bases abroad

Total: 950,000
-Active: 400,000
-Reserve: 550,000

Total: 210,204
-Active: 52,551
-Reserve: 157,653

Total: 210,202
-Active: 52,550
-Reserve: 157,651

Land Forces

Handguns

Shotguns

Sub-machine Guns:

Assault and Battle Rifles

Sniper Rifles

Anti-Material Rifles

Machine Guns

Rocket & Grenade Launchers

Grenades & Mines

Mortars

Recoilless Guns

AT Rockets

Handguns:
-Kılınç 2000
-P226
-Yavuz 16

Shotguns:
-M204
-M212
-MKA 1919

Sub-machine Guns:
-MP5
-P90

Assault and Battle Rifles:
-AKM
-G3A7
-HK33E
-HK416
-M4A1
-MPT-76
-SCAR
-TAR-21
-M1 Garand

Sniper Rifles:
-Arctic Warfare
-JNG-90
-KNT-308
-MSG-90
-SR-25
-SVD
-TRG

Anti-Material Rifles:
-Intervention
-İstiklal
-M82

Machine Guns:
-M2
-M60
-MAG
-MG3
-MINIMI
-PKM

Rocket & Grenade Launchers:
-9M133 Kornet
-AG36
-BGM-71 TOW
-ERYX
-FIM-92 Stinger
-M72 LAW
-M79
-M203
-MGL
-MILAN
-Mk 19
-T-40
-RPG-7

Grenades & Mines:
-AN/M14
-Claymore
-M14
-M15
-M19
-M21
-M67
-Mk 2

Mortars:
-HY-12
-K6
-M19
-M29
-M30
-M65

Recoilless Guns:
-Carl Gustav
-M18
-M20
-M40

AT Rockets:
-Mızrak-U
-Mızrak-O
-Cirit

Tanks

Armored Vehicles

Rockets & Artillery

Anti-Aircraft

Engineering Vehicles

Utility Vehicles

Cargo Vehicles

Radar Systems

Siyavash:
-650
Altay:
-1,207
Leopard 2:
-354
Leopard 1:
-397
M48 Patton:
-758

FNSS ACV-15:
-2,078
M113:
-3,162
Ejder:
-750
Kirpi:
-868
Cobra:
-1,200
Akrep:
-970

J-600T Yıldırım I:
-130
J-600T Yıldırım II:
-40
J-600T Yıldırım III:
-25
J-600T Yıldırım IV:
-10
T-300 Kasırga:
-80
TOROS:
-1
T-122 Sakarya:
-150
RA-7040:
-24
T-107:
-100
T-155 Fırtına:
-350
M52:
-362
M44:
-164
M108:
-26
FNSS ACV-15:
-170
Panter:
-400
S-400:
-12
MIM-104 Patriot:
-200

Atılgan PMADS:
-150
Zıpkın PMADS:
-80
FNSS ACV-30:
-1
Rheinmetall 20 mm:
-432

M48A5T5 Tamay:
-105
AZMIM:
-10
Leguan:
-36
SYHK:
-10

Engerek:
-550
Wrangler:
-5,700
Defender:
-9,800
M151:
-10
Willys MB:
-10

Mercedes Actros:
-10
Mercedes NG:
-10
BMC 380-26:
-403
BMC 235-16:
-282
BMC 185-09:
-706
Unimog:
-5,500

AN/TPQ 36:
-10
AN/TPQ 37:
-10
KALKAN:
-10
ACAR:
-10
SERHAT:
-10

Naval Forces

Carriers

Frigate

Corvette

Submarine

Fast attack craft

Patrol boat

Mine countermeasures vessel

Amphibious warfare ship

Training ship

Training boat

Replenishment oiler

Tanker ship

Troopship

Submarine rescue ship

Salvage tug

Net laying ship

Survey ship

Tugboat

Enterprise-class aircraft carrier:
-1 (TCG Mavi Vatan)

TCG Anadolu Class:
-5 ( TCG Mustafa Kemal, TCG Osman, TCG Fatih, TCG Süleyman and TCG Ertuğrul)

Gabya-class:
-16
Barbaros-class:
-8
Yavuz-class:
-8

Ada-class:
-13
Burak-class:
-15

Atılay-class:
-18
Preveze-class:
-14
Gür-class:
-9

Kılıç class:
-19
Yıldız-class:
-22
Doğan-class:
-14
Rüzgar-class:
-13
Kartal-class:
-12

Tuzla-class:
-34
Türk-class:
-51
PGM-class:
-46

Aydın-class:
-16
Engin-class:
-15
Seydi-class:
-14

Yeni-class:
-4
Ertuğrul-class:
-5
Osman Gazi-class:
-9
Bey-class:
-5
130-class:
-7
140-class:
-10
150-class:
-9
320-class:
-12

Cezayirli Hasan Paşa-class:
-15

E-class:
-9

Akar-class:
-10

Binbaşı Saadettin Gürcan-class:
-12
Albay Hakkı Burak-class:
-15

İskenderun-class:
-16

Alemdar-class:
-3
Akın-class:
-6

Işın-class:
-7

AN103-class:
-6
AN93-class:
-2

Çeşme-class:
-9
Çubuklu-class:
-4

İnebolu-class:
-4
Darıca-class:
-8
Gazal-class:
-5
Değirmendere-class:
-5
Önder-class:
-10

Air Forces

Combat Aircraft

Reconnaissance

Special Mission

Aerial refueling and transport

Trainer Aircraft

Aerobatic Aircraft

Helicopters

UAVs

Lockheed Martin F-16 Fighting Falcon:
-240
TAI TFX:
-394
F-35A:
-135
McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II:
-49
Northrop F-5E/F Tiger II:
-59

McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II:
-24

Boeing 737 AEW&C:
-10
CASA CN-235:
-8

Airbus A400M Atlas:
-5
Lockheed C-130 Hercules:
-18
Transall C-160:
-13
CASA CN-235:
-59

Northrop F-5E/F Tiger II:
-41
Northrop T-38 Talon:
-38
Alenia Aermacchi SF-260:
-38
Cessna T-41 Mescalero:
-32

Lockheed Martin F-16 Fighting Falcon:
-15
CASA CN-235:
-12
Lockheed C-130 Hercules:
-11
Transall C-160:
-16

TAI/AgustaWestland T129 ATAK:
-71
Eurocopter Cougar:
-49
Bell UH-1 Huey:
-64
RAT-24:
-74
RAT-330:
-50

TAI Anka:
-15


RawReport