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by The Federal Republic of Cossack Peoples. . 23 reads.

Harsk-Class Air Defense Frigate



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Harsk-Class Frigate
Harsk-Class


Type: Guided Missile Frigate
Designer: Korf Naval Yards Division
Builder(s): WURCo.
Preceded by: Miś-Class Frigate
Cost: B 400 million
Built: 2020-present
In commission: 2021 (predicted)
Completed: 0
Active: 0

Characteristics

Displacement: 4,500 metric tons
Length: 140 m
Beam: 16.5 m
Draft: 5.6 m
Propulsion: 2 x Voloshchuk SE-0745 gas turbines (27,000 shp, 19.4 MW), IEP
Speed: 29 knots max
Range: 11,700 km
Complement: 108 (Accomodations for 212)
Sensors/Processing Systems: Treker-932, Aromat-827, Pidmitaty-112DF, Ochyshchaty-347, Storozh-3138, BVPSS
EW and Decoys: Shok & Trepet Flares/Chaff, Fasad-849, Korop-932, Feya-2912, Hoblin-2920

Armament:

2 x 76.2mm VP-1248
2 x Kirilov-Hadjuk CIWS Batteries
3 x CMG-28 12.7mm machine guns
Missiles
2 x 4 "Marzanna" PRVD-808 canisters
32-cell Slinh Vertical Launching System:

20-cell Mesyats Enhanced Range Launch System:

ASW
2 x TIM-25 325mm triple torpedo tubes

Aircraft Carried: 1 VIGH-15

The Harsk-Class Frigate is a class of air defense warships designed and built by WURCo., a Cossack arms company. The Harsk was designed with lessons learned from the previous Miś-Class frigates during the South Seas War.

As part of a fleet revitalization program, the Harsk-Class features a smaller crew complement due to increased automation of ship systems, increased speed for patrol duties, and an advanced radar suite to protect fleet formations from air attacks.


History
The surface fleet of the Cossack Navy has historically spent more time consisting of patrol boats than it has operating anything larger; the rapid growth and development under the Bezukhov Administration allowed for a sudden change in the equipment, funding, and operations undertaken by the military branch. In particular, two domestic-made classes of warship served in the largest conflict in recent years, the Miś-Class and the Veliki Medved-Class. These two lines of vessels were largely the foundation for future developments; and while the Veliki Medved spawned the Tsvetkov-Class, the Miś-Class would lead into the development of the Harsk-Class.

The performance of the Miś-Class during its service life was complicated; the frigate was designed to simultaneously act as a patrol vessel and a front-line combat unit, and supposedly have focuses in anti-submarine warfare, anti-air warfare, and anti-surface warfare at the same time. This pursuit of a "ubiquitous" frigate led to a very overcomplicated, overpriced warship more akin to a destroyer than its assigned label of a frigate. Designers in WURCo. in late 2020 set about to cater to a proposal of a more reserved, patrol frigate that still served some fleet function-- and after the South Seas War, it was decided to be a lightweight anti-air vessel to complement larger formations, not dissimilar to the role the Skylancer-Class air defense frigate plays in the Imperiale Marine.

Production
Like the Proekt-1817, the production of the Proekt-1808 Harsk-Class was disputed between the several WURCo.-owned facilities and the single state-owned Nova Basan Maritime District; of the original sixteen ordered, twelve were handled by WURCo., and the rest were produced at the Nova Basan Maritime Yards.

VIGH-15 helicopter

The Harsk-Class notably lacks any nuclear capability (which the Tsvetkov-Class maintained with the use of nuclear-tipped PREC-506 missiles), which enabled the vessel to be considered for exportation, should co-opting be necessary to reduce procurement costs.

On an unspecified date in March of 2021, the first Harsk-Class vessel completed firing tests under military and corporate supervision.

Design
The Harsk-Class was optimized for anti-aircraft warfare and even ballistic missile defense, but is still well-equipped to serve as part of the Department of War's vision for a comprehensive coastal defense fleet.

The ship, when fully loaded, displaces some 4,500 metric tons of water and has a length and beam of 140 and 16.5 meters, respectively. The vessel's range was important, as to fulfill the Department of War's aspiration to expand the bluewater fleet of the FRCP; to that end, without refueling, the approximate range of the Harsk is 11,700 kilometers.

The class has a crew of 108, and accommodations for up to 212. The ship can embark up to three squads (42 soldiers) of Naval Infantry. The Harsk also has a hangar on its afterdeck allowing for the launch and transport of a VIGH-15 utility helicopter.

Propulsion
The Harsk-Class is equipped with integrated electric propulsion, which utilizes two Voloshchuk SE-0745 gas turbines to provide power to ship systems as well as the ship's propellers. The integrated electric propulsion layout also allows for quieter running by removing excess gearboxes and superfluous generators; each Voloshchuk SE-0745 produces up to 27,000 Linkshp and 19.4 MW of electrical power.

Sensors
Sonar
The sonar suite of the Harsk-Class consists of the Treker-932 bow-mounted low-frequency sonar (a downgraded version of the Morda-923 system present on the Tsvetkov) and the Aromat-827 torpedo approach warning system. The Treker-932, located in the bulbous bow of the Harsk, has a range in excess of 80 kilometers against submerged vessels of 5 Pa/Hz noisiness. Meanwhile, the Aromat-827 torpedo approach warning system comprises of a passive sonar array around the underside of the hull that can detect and classify oncoming torpedoes, to which the vessel can respond with Tryzub-1048 torpedoes.

Radar
The radar suite of the Harsk-Class uses a greatly improved Pidmitaty-112DF air search radar, which allows the Harsk to take on theater ballistic missile defense, and the various surface search and fire control radars. The Pidmitaty-112DF is a direct modification of the earlier Pidmitaty-112 used on the Tsvetkov-Class Destroyer, and features an lower frequency which allows it far greater range, with it being able to detect and track aerial targets of 1 m2 at ranges of up to 450 kilometers away, including incoming ballistic missiles. Using Interrupted Continuous Wave Illumination, the Pidmitaty-112DF can illuminate up to 32 incoming targets simultaneously for semi-active radar homing missiles to engage, although the radar can continue to only track up to 1,000 detectable targets. This capability greatly enhances the safety of the ship itself and the formation it sails with. Meanwhile, the Harsk-Class also includes the Ochyshchaty-347 air-and-surface search, tracking, and guidance radar. The Ochyshchaty operates in the X-band and is capable of tracking and engaging multiple targets simultaneously up to 400 kilometers away.

An example of a Storozh-3138 aperture

Another important component of the Harsk is the Storozh-3138 infrared search-and-track surveillance and tracking system, which provides 360o of infrared coverage. This can be particularly useful in intercepting stealth aircraft or other targets that would go unnoticed by radar, as well as provide another degree of awareness to the vessel; it may even be used as a crutch during operations that require low emissions, necessitating the shut down of radar and radio systems. The system has an effective range of the horizon; allowing it to operate alone in both a surface-search and air-search role.

The Multiple Medium and Intercept radar system is a radar system distributed across the hull of the Harsk-Class that comprise three different radar bands for different functions; an X-band radar for medium-to-long-range tracking and detection, a K-band radar for short range engagement (e.g. use of the main gun, point-defense/short-range missile launch), and a MMW-radar for point defense or main gun gunfire/rocketry. The system has a maximum range of 75 kilometers under its X-band radar.

Armament
The armament of the Harsk-Class focuses mainly on anti-air warfare, with a greater amount of surface-to-air missiles than any other vessel in the navy of the Cossack Peoples, although some surface warfare weapons are maintained for its own defense and to aid the vessel in a patrol function. The class also maintains a limited anti-submarine warfare ability, with launchers for Tryzub-1048 torpedoes.

The main gun of the Harsk, the Kirilov-Chornyj VP-1248, is a twin-barrel, automatic 76.2mm naval gun housed in a turret at the front of the ship; it has a cyclic rate of fire of 90 rounds per minute and effective ranges of 8,000 meters against subsonic missiles, 15,000 meters for aircraft, and 18,000 meters against static, land-based targets. The guns use a unitary cannon cartridge along with an automated loaded system to maintain high rates of fire and continuous use until the naval gun's magazine is spent. The VP-1248 fire control system is integrated into the shipwide BVPSS (Multiple Medium and Intercept) tri-band point-defense radar system, which gives it a detection radius of 75 kilometers against aerial targets. The ammunition used is either the standard multipurpose 6.8 kilogram BST-419 High-Explosive shells to PDR-420 anti-aircraft/missile fragmentation shell.

The anti-ship armament of the Harsk-Class is two quad-canisters of "Marzanna" PRVD-808 anti-ship and land-attack missiles, located atop the hangar installation at 45o angles.

"Marzanna" launch canisters

The "Marzanna" PRVD-808 is a low-observable air, surface, and ship-launched anti-ship and land-attack missile. The missile's fuselage is made from composite materials shaped to reduce radar reflections and its subsonic speeds allow for seaskimming flight altitudes, both of which significantly reduce the detection range of the missile and subsequently the reaction time given to the defenses to counteract the missile-- proving the missile to be a deadly system on its own while maintaining a small and adaptable size. The 400 kilogram missile can reach land and sea targets at low (seaskimming) altitudes at up to 185 kilometers, but by following a hi-hi-low flight path the range can be greatly extended to 555 kilometers at the expense of risking long-range detection by large radar systems. The "Marzanna" flies at high subsonic speeds, often cited at 988 kilometers per hour. The guidance of the missile relies off of inertial guidance with mid-point updates via data link with launch platform until its terminal phase where it uses an imaging infrared seeker to acquire and engage the target. The onboard computer is capable of performing a series of random maneuvers to evade countermeasures and point defense while closing on its target. Once the target is impacted, the "Marzanna"'s 125-kilogram blast-fragmentation warhead detonates.

Deployed through deck-mounted triple torpedo tubes located on both sides of the vessel, the Tryzub-1048 is a dual-use torpedo able to successfully engage both submarines and torpedos. The 280-kilogram submersible uses acoustic homing and a chemical energy propulsion system to reach its target at speeds up to 40 knots while maintaining a range of 17 kilometers and a maximum depth of 593 meters. Apart from a conventional ship-borne launch, the torpedo can also be deployed via aircraft (naval helicopter, maritime patrol aircraft) and by means of the Kachka UVPP-1021 standoff submarine weapon (which the Harsk is usually not equipped).

Anti-Air Capabilities
The Harsk-Class has two VLS systems each located in the afterdeck, attached to the top of the superstructure, and foredeck, in the B position relative to the main gun; a modification of the Slinh Vertical Launching System, and the Mesyats VX-1324 Enhanced Range Launch System. Both systems are dedicated to anti-air missiles, launching primarily three types; the Sokil PHO-874, the Yastrub PHO-953, and the Podorozh-400, a modification of the land-based RtrPR-400 SAM system.

FRCPN Sladkoye awaiting sea trials

The modified Slinh VLS is in a 32-cell configuration in the foredeck of the Harsk, and capable of firing the Sokil PHO-874 and Yastrub PHO-953 anti-air missiles. The Mesyats Enhanced Range Launch System is a 20-cell vertical launching system located in the space on the superstructure between the command and accommodation sections and the telescopic hangar. The Mesyats is intended to primarily fire the large, long-range Podorozh-400 missile.

The Sokil PHO-874 is a short-range, solid-fuel surface to air missile produced solely for naval vessels. The missile's measurements are far smaller than the other munitions carried in the Slinh VLS; it is only 4 meters long with a diameter of 400 millimeters; because of its small size, the Slinh VLS cell can carry up to four Sokil missiles each. The missile, using its rudimentary solid-propellant rocket motor and sleek frame, can reach speeds of Mach 3+ to intercept targets like incoming cruise missiles and nearby aircraft. Due to its smaller frame and lower fuel reserves, the missile has a range of 58 kilometers, where it has hit test targets traveling at hypersonic speeds. The guidance of the missile relies on initial semi-active radar homing to designate a target before switching during the midcourse or terminal flight to IR homing. Upon the triggering of its radio proximity fuze, the Sokil's 55-kilogram HE-Fragmentation warhead detonates.

The Yastrub PHO-953 is a medium-range surface-to-air missile system. It came as part of the ADARP (Air Defense Acquisition and Revitalization Program) series of air defense reforms and includes a mobile land-based variant as well as a sea variant. It is designed to counter cruise missiles, smart bombs, fixed- and rotary-wing aircraft, and unmanned air vehicles. The air defense system, paired with the Pidmitaty-112DF, can engage targets with radar cross sections of down to 0.05 meters squared at ranges up to 180 kilometers. The missile is 5.5 meters long with a two-mode solid-fuel rocket engine that allows it to accelerate up to Mach 5.3 with a total burn time of eighteen seconds. Integrated into the Pidmitaty-112 L-band radar, the missile's guidance system is via Radio Command and semi-active radar homing. Upon the target triggering the radio proximity fuze, the 60-kilogram blast fragmentation warhead detonates, scattering nearly 7,000 pieces of fragmentation in prearranged patterns to damage or destroy aircraft or munitions.

A very large missile, the Podorozh-400 is meant to project the air suppression capability of the Harsk and is kept in the twenty-cell Mesyats VX-1324 Enhanced Range Launch System that are specially fitted to accommodate the missile. A derivative of the land-based RtfPR-400 air defense system, the naval Podorozh-400 comprises of only an analog of the Ipabog DRPP-19, utilizing the missile's frame for its long-range and anti-ballistic missile capability. The Podorozh-400 has a range of 496 kilometers against air targets and a range of 65 kilometers against ballistic missiles; during its flight process, it will fly to the altitude or predicted altitude of the target, selected with semi-active radar homing, and then will toggle into a search-and-destroy mode with active radar homing. The Podorozh-400 utilizes a 200-kilogram continuous rod warhead, specialized in incapacitating or destroying air targets; it is detonated via radio proximity fuse. The missile is both effective against low-altitude targets at extremely long range and incoming ballistic missiles. The maximum target speed engageable by the system is Mach 14 (17,000 km/h).

Point Defense
The Harsk-Class is equipped with two Kirilov-Hadjuk Close-In Weapon System batteries to provide the class with sufficient point defense to protect itself from missile attacks as well as extend that protection to nearby vessels. The Kirilov-Hadjuk CIWS is a point defense system that is replacing former Kirilov systems; it features a more advanced fire-control radar, a centralized coordination network, and more advanced missile systems due to the partnership with Vladislav Hajduk, another notable weapons designer for WURCo. The system is organized into "batteries"; i.e. each involving fire control equipment independent from ship operations and two autocannons and several missiles based in a turret. The basis for the CIWS, like its predecessor, is based in the turret of the 5P103 "Urs Negru" SAM system, but in contrast, has different fire control and newer missiles that fit the tubes. The fire control of the Kirilov-Hajduk consists of a Ka-band active phased array radar (range 30 km) and electro-optical sensors (range 15 km) with an approximate maximum detection range of 30 kilometers, although active engagement begins only at 15 kilometers away due to weapons range. The missiles used are Dzʹob-1252 surface-to-air missiles, which have a range of 15 kilometers and a ceiling of 14,000 meters. Using a solid-fuel rocket, the missile can reach speeds of up to Mach 3.8. The Dz'ob-1252 makes use of active MMW radar guidance, which gives the missile very high resolution for target interception. Once intercepted, a radio proximity fuse will detonate its 13-kilogram blast-fragmentation warhead. The guns, on the other hand, have a far shorter engagement range, only able to effectively fire upon targets at a range of 3,000 meters. The two 20mm autocannons have a rate of fire of 4,500 rounds a minute, and typically fire armor-piercing discarding sabot rounds with a sub-caliber tungsten penetrator. The turrets are able to be equipped with a stealth casing to improve the vessel's overall observability by covering most of the very obtuse shaping of the standard turret. Each "battery" usually includes eight missiles (though 18 more missiles stand ready in a magazine behind the turret) and 1,300 rounds of ammunition; multiple of these systems can be mounted on a naval vessel.

Countermeasures
The Harsk-Class uses multiple countermeasures and protection methods to increase its survivability against a variety of targets. The most rudimentary of which are the Shok and Trepet missile countermeasures, which are flares and chaff, respectively, launched from the sides of the vessel from 2x8 dispensers. The typical load for these dispensers is 25-30 of each countermeasure. In addition, the Harsk uses an 80mm Fasad-849 anti-ship missile decoy, which is a rocket deployed from the ship designed to seduce oncoming radar-guided munitions with decoy radar transmissions while "hovering" safely away from the actual vessel. For torpedoes, the Harsk makes use of the Korop-932 towed torpedo decoy, which mimics and exaggerates the sonar signature of the Harsk with the intent of drawing the torpedo towards itself rather than the ship.

Hoblin-2920 EW system

The primary electronic countermeasures of the Harsk-Class are the Feya-2912 and the Hoblin-2920 systems. Compared to the Tsvetkov's Hremlin-2916 electronic countermeasure system, the Hoblin-2920 is far more sophisticated. The Hoblin-2920 is capable of detecting high-band radar signals commonly used by missiles and aircraft, classifying the threats, and then jamming up to 15 simultaneous targets across multiple bandwidths. While the effect of the Hoblin is identical to the Hremlin on a single missile, the Hoblin finds use in a larger fleet setting, able to jam more than its share of missiles, allowing other vessels to conserve their attention for engaging the enemy. Meanwhile, the Feya-2912 acts as an electronic support system, capable of receiving and interpreting signals across a wide spectrum, and, with multiple receivers dotted across the vessel, can triangulate the position of the source of the signals by determining the time it takes for the signal to reach three or more receivers.

Ships in Class

Name

Builder

Laid Down

Commissioned

Status

FRCPN Harsk

Korf Naval Yards

December 27, 2020

*

Under Construction

FRCPN Sladkoye

Korf Naval Yards

December 31, 2020

*

Under Construction

FRCPN Sevyich

Nova Basan Maritime District

December 31, 2020

*

Under Construction

Unnamed

Korf Naval Yards

Planned

Unnamed

Korf Naval Yards

Planned

Unnamed

Nova Basan Maritime District

Planned

Unnamed

Korf Naval Yards

Planned

Unnamed

Korf Naval Yards

Planned

Unnamed

Korf Naval Yards

Planned

Unnamed

Nova Basan Maritime District

Planned

Unnamed

Korf Naval Yards

Planned

Unnamed

Korf Naval Yards

Planned

Unnamed

Nova Basan Maritime District

Planned

Unnamed

Korf Naval Yards

Planned

Unnamed

Korf Naval Yards

Planned

Unnamed

Korf Naval Yards

Planned



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