by Max Barry

Latest Forum Topics

Advertisement

1

DispatchBulletinPolicy

by The Kingdom of Coconut Palm Island. . 1 reads.

Criminal Rehabilitation Act of 2020

Criminal Rehabilitation Act of 2020

July 6, 2020

A supermajority of this Senate, as well as King Alexander, hereby certify that the Criminal Sentencing Act of 2008, while it was a good start, needs to be revised. This bill is meant to standardize the sentencing in criminal trials, while reaffirming our belief that criminal justice shall be rehabilitative and restorative, not punitive or deterrent. As King Alexander stated in 2018, “Even the most heinous us criminal can be rehabilitated with the right treatment, education, and welfare. But, more importantly, schools should add Ethics as a subject, to ensure that every citizen is equipped to make the right choices and avoid criminal activity altogether.”

(1) Effective at the beginning of the 2020/2021 academic year, two semesters of ethics shall be added to the graduation requirement for schools. The first shall be called Introduction to Ethics, and the second shall be called Development of the Personal Moral Compass. The Department of Education and the Department of Justice shall work together to develop a curriculum for these courses.

(2) “Felonies” shall be defined as Class A, Class B, and Class C offenses. “Misdemeanors” shall be defined as Class D and Class E offenses. “Civil Offenses” shall be defined as Class F and Class G offenses.

(3) “Incarceration” shall mean detention in a Rehabilitation Center, consistent with the Criminal Sentencing Act of 2008.
(3a) No person shall be incarcerated for a single offense, or set of offenses, for more than 20 years. No sentence shall be longer than 8 years for non-Class A offenses. No misdemeanor or set of misdemeanors shall result in a sentence longer than a year.

(4) “Community Rehabilitation” shall be defined as an individual receiving support from a psychiatrist, a counselor, a welfare officer, and a police officer (acting as an ethics educator).
(4a) Failure to comply with the terms of rehabilitation shall be punished summarily by a period of incarceration no longer than 14 days; a third or subsequent violation may result in up to 30 days of incarceration.

(5) “Community Service” shall be defined as an individual performing work to better the community, either for the government or a nonprofit.
(5a) Failure to complete community service shall be punished summarily by a period of incarceration no longer than 7 days for each violation.
(5b) Community service shall not infringe upon a person’s ability to hold down a job— no more than 12 hours shall be required per week if a person holds full-time employment; if an individual works less than 30 hours a week, no more than 18 hours shall be required per week.

(6) A fine shall be defined as paying money to the government, or a government-approved charity, as punishment for an offense. Fines shall be defined in terms of “Penalty Units”, with one Penalty Unit equaling 2% of an individual’s average monthly income. No individual shall be compelled to pay more than 36% of their income for any given month.
(6a) Failure to pay off a fine in a reasonable amount of time shall be punished summarily by a period of incarceration no longer than 3 days for each violation.
(6b) An individual legitimately unable to pay a fine shall not be incarcerated. Individuals may request an extension for any fine.

(7) Felonies shall generally be punished by a period of incarceration in a rehabilitation center, or alternatively by a period of community rehabilitation.
(7a) Class A offenses shall result in up to 20 years of incarceration. An individual may be sentenced to up to 10 years of community rehabilitation following the period of incarceration.
(7b) Class B offenses shall result in up to 8 years of incarceration. An individual may be sentenced to up to 5 years of community rehabilitation following the period of incarceration.
(7c) Class C offenses shall result in up to 3 years of incarceration. An individual may be sentenced to up to 3 years of community rehabilitation following the period of incarceration. However, an individual convicted of a Class C offense AND who has not been convicted of a felony in the past 10 years can be eligible for an alternate sentence of up to 500 hours of community service and 3 years of community rehabilitation.

(8) Misdemeanors shall generally be punished by penalties other than incarceration in a rehabilitation center, with incarceration being reserved for the most serious or habitual misdemeanors.
(8a) Class D offenses shall result in up to 1 year of community rehabilitation and up to 500 hours of community service. For severe or habitual offenses, up to 1 year of incarceration is possible.
(8e) Class E offenses shall result in up to 6 months of community rehabilitation and up to 250 hours of community service. For severe or habitual offenses, up to 3 months of incarceration is possible.

(9) Civil offenses shall be punished by a fine or period of community service; incarceration shall not be used for civil offenses except when it is necessary because a fine or community service sentence was blatantly ignored.
(9a) Class F offenses shall result in up to 20 hours of community service, and/or a fine of 15 Penalty Units.
(9b) Class G offenses shall result in up to 5 hours of community service, and/or a fine of up to 5 Penalty Units. However, a person not convicted of any offense in the last 10 years (including a civil offense) may be let off with a warning, if the judge determines they are not a risk to reoffend and is sorry.

King Alexander
King of Coconut Palm Island
Nicholas Curry
President of the Senate of Coconut Palm Island

RawReport