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DispatchFactbookEconomy

by The United Empire of Eritei. . 26 reads.

Hare Imperitus

Hare Imperitus


₤50 Banknote and a ₤1 Coin (Obverse)



Code

ERH

Number

380

Exponent

2


Denominations


Subunit
1/100

Centecimino

Plural

Hara

Centecimino

Centecimina

Symbol

Centecimino

c

Banknotes

₤5, ₤10, ₤20, ₤50, ₤100, ₤500

Coins

Freq. Used

c5, c10, c25, c50, ₤1, ₤2

Rarely Used

c1, c2


Demographics


Official User(s)

Eritei
LinkSan Marino (Local issue:
Sammarinese Hare)
LinkVatican City (Local issue:
Vatican Hare)


Issuance


Central Bank

Ver Imperia's Treasury of Eritei

Printer

Printing Society of Eturia &
Printing Enlightened Co.

Mint

Imperial Mint of Milan &
Royal Mint of Roma &
State Mint of Genoa


Valuation


Inflation

1.7%


The Hare Imperitus (Symbol: ; LinkISO code: ERH), simply known as the Hare, is the official currency of Eritei, LinkSan Marino, and the LinkVatican City. It is subdivided into 100 Centecimina (singular: Centecimino, abbreviated: c). Although being an exstensive colonial empire, only one nation has a currency that shares the name Hare, that nation being LinkComoros, with the Comorian Hare.

Both San Marino and the Vatican City produce their own version of the Hare (the Sammarinese Hare and Vatican Hare), which are considered fully equivilant to the Eriteian Hare in their respective countries. Due to the size of the countries, and how it's hard for the two to produce both Euro and Hare, deals have been brokered for Eritei to print and mint their respective currencies.

Names



The full official name Hare Imperitus (plural: Hara Imperitus), is mainly used in formal contexts, and usually whenever it might be needed to distinguish between other currencies with the same name. Otherwise, the name Hare is used. The currency is sometimes abbreviated to just Imperitus, including in the wholesale financial markets, but not when referring to specific amounts. The abbreviation "Imp" is sometimes used, and so is the name "Eriteian Hare" is used more commonly in less formal contexts, however is not the name of the currency.

Etymology

The actual origin of the "Hare Imperitus" is still widely debated, since it's one of the only sources of information that isn't well documented when Eritei formed back in 1436. The most widely accepted theory, however, is that due to the two different currencies of Eturia and Italy (which even then were broken up into individual currencies for each region) it would have been almost impossible to keep internal trade alive from North to South. So, soon after the Roma Union Act, a currency in which was pronounceable by both Eturians and Italians was created, the Hare. Imperitus is believe to have been added later, to solidify the fact that it was the Eriteian currency.

Symbol

The currency sign for the Hare is ₤, which is always written with two bars through the L. The Hare symbol is extremely identical to the Pound sterling symbol, which only has one line instead of two, and does not have a bump in the bottom of the L. The reason the two are like this is unknown, however the current theory is that the English created the symbol, and when found by the Eriteians, they simply copied it thinking it was an older currency.

History



(idk if I wanna write this, I'll do it later maybe possibly idk)

Coins



At current, the oldest circulating coin in Eritei is the c1 Centecimino, which was discontinued in 2003, however is still legal tender, as the government wishes to collect all the coins to re-use them.

Each coin has a picture of Empress Rose I on the obverse, with the words, "Per Sanguinem Effundimus" (Through Blood We Shed), which is the words on the Civil Coat of Arms. The motto was introduced on the coins in 1791, a while after the Peasants Revolt, in order to confirm that the money wasn't just the Empire's, but also the peoples currency. The face of Rose I is facing to the right as a tradition on all the coinage. Each new monarch faces away from the previous.

Each coin has a depiction of something meaningful to Eritei on the reverse, with the amount written on the top along with the year minted on the bottom.

A common writing practice on each coin is to refer to the amount as a singular Hare, for instance, instead of "Due Hara", it's written "Due Hare".

Obverse

Reverse

Coin

Value

Notes

Cinque Centecimino
5 Cent

c5

Reverse shows the leaves of the Arbutus unedo

Dieci Centecimino
10 Cent

c10

Reverse shows the angel of Saint Taziana Pinto

Ventecenquini Centecimino
25 Cent

c25

Reverse shows a Grey Wolf howling at the moon

Cenquanitia Centecimino
50 Cent

c50

Reverse shows the VIN Imperitus Maximina

Une Hare
1 Hare

₤1

Reverse shows the Colosseum in Rome

Due Hare
2 Hare

₤2

Reverse is the Coat of Arms of the House of Zaccaria

Banknotes


The first banknotes of Eritei were issued in 1678, during the economic downturn during the times. Originally printed with the ₤20 and up, it was later adopted for the ₤10, ₤5, and even a ₤1 and ₤2 banknote were created, however were discontinued in 1928.

Obverse

Reverse

Banknote

Value

Notes

Cinque Hare
5 Hare

₤5

Obverse: Emperor Leonzio XVIII
Reverse: VIN Per Panguiem

Dieci Hare
10 Hare

₤10

Obverse: Maria Montessori
Reverse: Montessori Education

Vente Hare
20 Hare

₤20

Obverse: Galileo Galilei
Reverse: Conclusion

Cenquanitia Hare
50 Hare

₤50

Obverse: Empress Rose I
Reverse: The Alps

Centoa Hare
100 Hare

₤100

Obverse: Lisabetta d'Este
Reverse: Guglielmo Marconi, Inventor of the Radio

Cinquacentoa Hare
500 Hare

₤500

Obverse: Emperor Adamuccio I & II
Reverse: Coronation of Emperor Adamuccio I & II, the First Emperor




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