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by The United States of Amaurita. . 123 reads.

The Capital | The United States of Amaurita

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Further Reading: The Constitution of the United States of Amaurita


The Presidency

The Congress

The Supreme Court




The Presidency




The Presidency


Incumbent
Andrew. H. Cunningham
Since 21 January 2285
General Information

Residence

The Presidential
Mansion

Seat

Columbia, Federal District of

Status

Head of State, Head of Government

Member Of:

Federal Cabinet

Constitutionality

Nominator

Political Parties

Appointer

Electoral College

Term Length

4 Years, Renewable Once

History

Constituting Instrument

U.S Constitution

Formation

1778

Inaugural Holder

Frederick Markington (I, VA)

Current Holder

Andrew H. Cunningham (R, GA)

Salary (2289 - 2290)

$0.00

The President of the United States is the official head of state and the head of government in the United States of Amaurita. The President is the head of the federal government's executive branch, and is also the Commander in Chief of the United States Armed Forces.

The executive branch is established by Article II in the United States Constitution, and vests the executive power of the United States Federal Government in the President of the United States. This executive power includes the execution and enforcement of federal law, appointing federal level judicial, regulatory, executive, and diplomatic officers with the consent of the United States Senate, as well as concluding treaties with foreign powers, with the consent of the Senate. The President is also responsible for directing domestic and foreign policy, in addition to actively promoting their policy priorities to the legislators. The President may also grant pardons and reprieves, and may also convene or adjourn both legislative bodies under extraordinary circumstances. In addition to this, laws passed by the legislature require the President's signature or veto, although this can be bypassed with a two-thirds vote from both houses. The Executive Branch's power has grown since its initial establishment, as had the entirety of the federal government.

The President is elected indirectly by the citizens of the United States to a four year term, which is renewable once. Registered Voters, in the Election, elect the delegates their state will send to the Electoral College, and in turn, the Delegates vote on behalf of their constituents. The Presidency of the United States is the only electable federal office that is not decided by popular vote. Nine Presidents have became so by virtue of the previous President dying intra-term, or resigning.

Article II, Section 1, Clause 5 in the United States Constitution sets forth several requirements that candidates must meet in order to be eligible to run for President. Candidates must have attained US citizenship through birth, have been a resident in the United States for a minimum of fourteen years, and have attained 35 years of age. The 22nd Amendment to the US Constitution outlaws Presidents serving more than two terms, or eight years, in the office of President.

Andrew Horatio Cunningham is the current President of the United States, having been elected in the 2288 Presidential Election and having been sworn in on January 21st, 2289. His term expires on January 21st, 2293. Prior to being elected President, President Cunningham served as the Governor of Georgia, a member of the Parliament of Representatives, and as a Colonel in the United States Army.


Roles in Government


The President of the United States, through the Constitution, is granted multiple powers in the Federal Government of the United States.

The Presentment Clause in the Constitution mandates that the President must sign any bill ratified in the legislature in order for said bill to become federal law. The President has three options once the proposed bill is presented. If the President signs the bill and returns it to the legislature within ten days (excluding Sunday's), the proposed bill passes and becomes a law. The President may also veto the proposed bill and return it to the legislature in the same timeframe, although this may be bypassed with a two-thirds vote in both legislative houses. Alternatively, the President may take no action at all. If the ten day timeframe expires while the legislature is in Session, the bill becomes a law, as if the President signed the bill. However, if the ten day timeframe expires and the Legislature is not in session, the bill is vetoed (pocket-veto). The President may also be involved in the creation of legislation in the Congress of the United States. This can be accomplished through suggesting, requesting, or even insisting on certain policy proposals. The President may also shape legislation by influencing individual members of the legislature. The President's power in this aspect is checked, however, as only members of the legislature can propose legislation to the legislative bodies as a whole for voting or debate.

One of the most prominent roles of the President of the United States is being the Commander in Chief of the United States Armed Forces. While the power to declare war is constitutionally vested in the legislature, but the direction and disposition of the Amauritan Military is ultimately the President's role alone. In accordance to the War Powers Act, the legislature must approve deployments of military assets for any period longer than 100 days, hence meaning the President's role is checked. Additionally, the legislature may check the President's Military powers through control over military spending. The Operational Command of the Military is delegated to the U.S War Department, and exercised by the War Secretary. The U.S Joint Chiefs of Staff, a collection of enlisted and commissioned officers from all major branches and departments, assist the War Secretary in carrying out operations. The Constitution also empowers the president to propose and chiefly negotiate agreements between the United States and other countries. Such agreements, upon receiving the advice and consent of the U.S. Senate (by a two-thirds majority vote), become binding with the force of federal law.

The President is also charged with overseeing multiple departments that are part of the executive branch, which includes managing the multiple executive departments, as well as appointing and dismissing the heads of said departments. An incoming President may make as many as 10,000 appointments, and may appoint a further 20,000 officers throughout their term. Federal Officers are all appointed and dismissed by the President with "The advice and consent of the Senate." The most prominent Federal Officers, including the Justices on the Supreme Court, the Federal Judges and the Chief of the General Staff, require a majority vote from the Senate in order to officially hold the role. The President may also convene and adjourn the legislative body under circumstances deemed extraordinary, such as the Turnip Day Session held in 1948, convened by President Harrison S. Anderson. The power to adjourn the legislative body, though vested in the President, has never been utilized by any President to date.


The Federal Cabinet


[center]

Office

Incumbent

Assumed Office

Party

Home State

Status

Vice President

Heidi Buchanan

21 January 2285

|| Democratic-Republican||

Oklahoma

-

President of Congress

Omar Ramirez

3 January 2289

|| Federal Democratic||

Palma

-

United States Attorney General

J.B Powell
Major General, USA

3 January 2284

|| Democratic-Republican||

Alabama

-

United States Postmaster-General

-

DATE

|| N/A||

-

-

United States Solicitor-General

Elizabeth Waxman

4 April 2285

|| Federal Democratic||

Idaho

-

United States Surgeon-General

Michael Sugiyama
Rear Admiral, USN

4 May 2282

|| Democratic-Republican||

Hawaii

-

Secretary of Agriculture

-

DATE

|| N/A||

-

-

Secretary of Commerce

Levi Rodney

4 May 2286

|| Federal Democratic||

Kalinea

-

Secretary of Defense

Andrew Murray
Major General, USMC

3 February 2285

|| Democratic-Republican||

Colorado

-

Secretary of Education

Alphonso Rodriguez

13 October
2285

|| Democratic-Republican||

Texas

-

Secretary of Energy

-

DATE

|| N/A||

-

-

Secretary of Health and Human Services

Dr. Maria Caparossi

9 February 2285

|| Democratic-Republican||

Jersey

-

Secretary of Homeland Security

-

DATE

|| N/A||

-

-

Secretary of Infrastructure

-

DATE

|| N/A||

-

-

Secretary of the Interior

-

DATE

|| N/A||

-

-

Secretary of Labor

Esther H. Perkins

7 February 2285

|| Democratic-Republican||

Minnesota

-

Secretary of the Treasury

-

DATE

|| N/A||

-

-


The Legislators of the United States




The United States Congress
General Information

Type:

Bi-Cameral

Houses:

The U.S Senate

The Parliament of Representatives

Meeting Place

The Capitol,
Columbia (Federal District of)

Salary (2289-2290)

$0.00

History

Established

1778

Preceded By:

The Congress of Confederation

Leadership

President of Congress

Omar Ramirez (FD)
Since January 21st, 2289

President of the
Senate

Hannah Corwin (DR)
Since January 3rd, 2280

President of Parliament

Patrick McCormack (DR)
Since January 3rd, 2284

Structure

Seats:

200 Senators
800 Representatives

Length of Term:

6 Years, Renewable Once (Senate)

2 Years, Renewable for Six Terms (Parliament)


The Senate

Political Groups:

-- Democratic Republican Party (109)*

-- Federal Democratic (68)

-- Bull Moose Party (11)

-- Union (12)

*Ruling Coalition


The Parliament

Political Groups:

-- Democratic Republican Party (446)*

-- Federal Democratic (236)

-- Bull Moose Party (68)

-- Union (50)

*Majority Coalition

Elections

Voting System:

Appointment by State Legislatures (Senate)

Preferential Voting (Parliament)

Previous Senate
Election

October 21st, 2288

Previous Parliament
Election

October 21st, 2288

Next Senate
Election

October 21st, 2290

Next Parliament
Election

October 21st, 2290



The United States Congress is the legislative body of the United States Federal Government. The U.S Congress is comprised of two houses: The United States Senate and the United States Parliament of Representatives. Representatives are elected directly by the people of the State they represent. Senators, in contrast, are nominated and affirmed by their State Legislature. The United States Legislature was established in 1778 by the United States Constitution, under Article One. The Federal Legislature is comprised of 200 Senators and 800 Representatives, totaling 1,000 members of the Legislature.


The United States Senate


The United States Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Legislature. The composition of the Senate was established under Article One of the Constitution of the United States. The Senate is composed of Senators, whom represent their state in its entirety. Regardless of the state's population, each State is allotted two seats in the Senate. As there are 100 States that are part of the Union, the Senate has 200 members. Senators are nominated and appointed by their State Legislature, and serve a term of six years. A Senator may renew their term once, after which they are legally obligated to end their service in the Senate. Former Senators may serve in other positions in Government, however, so long as they meet the required qualifications and have not served the maximum number of terms prior to becoming Senator. The. Senate is regarded as a more collegial and less partisan house, as a result of longer terms, statewide constituencies, smaller size, and lack of elections to receive appointment.

The United States Senate is more closely tied with the Presidency when compared to the Parliament's relationship with the Executive Branch. Federal Officers, such as Supreme Court Justices, Federal Judges, and Cabinet Members are all appointed by the Senate after nomination by the President, in a simple majority vote. The Senate may also hold hearings for impeachment, and host impeachment trials with the Supreme Court presiding, though the Parliament must approve these motions in a two-thirds vote. Additionally, the Senate also has the power to ratify or reject treaties and other international dealings proposed and negotiated by the President. The position of President of the Senate, the Presiding Officer of the Senate, is filled by the Vice-President of the United States. The President of the Senate is primarily a ceremonial role, apart form the Vice-President's ability to break any tie in Senate votes. The Senate must also pass bills in concurrence with the Parliament before it may be signed by the President. Senators may propose bills just as Representatives, except for revenue and spending bills.


The Parliament of Representatives


The United States Parliament of Representatives is the lower chamber of the United States Legislature. The composition of the Parliament was established under Article One of the Constitution of the United States. The Parliament is composed of Representatives, whom represent a single District of their state. The number of Representatives each State is allotted is dependent on their state's population; and larger states have more Representatives. The Parliament, given its basis on State Population, has a total membership of 800 overall. Representatives are elected directly by the People of their District, and serve a term of two years. A Representative may renew their term a maximum of six times, after which they are legally obligated to end their service in the Parliament. Former Representatives may serve in other positions in Government, however, so long as they meet the required qualifications and have not served the maximum number of terms prior to becoming Representatives.

The Parliament of Representatives is loosely tied to the Senate and Executive Branch, when compared to the Senate's relationships with the other branches. The Parliament may propose bills just as the Senate, which includes revenue and spending bills, an ability the Senate does not possess. The Parliament must also pass bills on concurrence with the Senate, before it may signed by the President and enacted as law. The Parliament, just as the Senate, can override a Presidential Veto with a two-thirds vote in both houses. The Parliament may also vote to proceed with impeachment hearings and trials in a two-thirds vote, though these affairs are presided over by the Senate and Supreme Court, given the more partisan nature of the Parliament. The Parliament, should no Presidential candidate receive a majority of electoral votes, may decide the victor of Presidential Elections, though this power has never been used.


Legislators, By State


State

Senators

Representatives

Total Electoral Votes


The Supreme Court


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