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by The Federal Republic of The Peruvian Union. . 12 reads.

Government of the Confederation




C O N F E D E R A LG O V E R N M E N TO FP E R U - B O L I V I A
.
G O B I E R N OC O N F E D E R A LP E R Ú - B O L I V I A N O
.

L O N G L I V ET H E U N I O N
.
L A R G AV I D AAL AU N I Ó N
.

Andean Confederal Government
Gobierno Confederal de Perú-Bolivia



Country

Federal Republic of the Andes

Headquarters

Confederal Palace, Lima

Seat

Federal City of Lima

Formation

1836, 183 years ago

Legislature

Congress of the Confederation

Leader

Supreme Protector of the Confederation

Gobierno de la Confederación


The De Salas regime (Spanish: Régimen De Salas), is a union of political parties led by the FN (National Front) party under the guidance of the General President. The political block was founded shortly after the Revolution of 45 where the republican government was overthrown by a Hidalgo De Salas, then minister of defence. Under De Salas' guidance, a new political structure was created and a total of 6 political parties were ousted from the General Assembly. Only 6 original parties following De Salas doctrine were admitted. The proclamation of the new regime led to severe restructuration both federally and politically. In 1984 the General Assembly began to open membership to civilians as to promote political participation. Today the De Salas alliance boasts 5,000,000 members.

History

Oirigin

Revolution of 1945

De Salas doctrine

Following the Revolution of 45, De Salas dismantled the congress indefinitely and instead proclaimed a party alliance among its supporters, the initial coalition constituted the NF (National Front), the PNR (National Revolutionary Party) and the MP (Popular Movement), the newly proclaimed congress initially held 130 party members. Around 7 parties were ousted from the congress following the dismantlement. Such radical movements from De Salas were met with strong opposition from most former congressmen and was seen as a step-back towards authoritarianism opposite to the democratic efforts led after the Mexican revolution. Shortly thereafter, De Salas changed the constitutional title of "president" to "general president" reflecting the federal characterism of Mexico. He, together with a board of nationalists, designed a scheme of "plans" starting with the plan of Villanueva and consequently structured what would represent the De Salas doctrine, popularly known as Salismo. His strategic scheme for the restructuration of Mexico and its government was followed by a change of the emblem and flag, instalment of a national salute and the change of all member states to "federal states". While many of his policies pointed towards greater autonomy among its territories, all decisions were ultimately filtered and enacted by the government in Mexico City.

In 1947, De Salas enacted a new policy for the election of Palacios Nacionales, historic buildings which would function as headquarters for the many institutes of the government, among such palaces included the Chapultepec Castle, the palace of Nuevo León and the National Palace. Following his policy, De Salas also ordered the construction of a new palace which would commemorate the achievements of his regime, this building was named Palacio de Gran México, "Grand Mexico Palace". During his rule, De Salas favoured 5 values; family, justice, faith, determination and integrity. Known as Los Cinco Valores, "the five values" which were to be taught in all educational institutions.

Many of his later policies targeted educational institutions, with the implementation of a universal right for all Mexicans to public education on all levels. The organisation and regulation of transport and state-owned companies led to a stable economy and equitative development throughout all federal states. He introduced a mixed economy and gave equal rights to all companies regardless of their precedence and origin. He later enacted a policy for market diversification, assets and privileges could be granted to companies who had the largest investments in Mexico.

The Great Purge

In 1951, with the growth of oppositions within the country, De Salas feared a possible insurgence of civilians, his policies from the already 6-year-old regime had come into effect. While proving effective for the economic growth of Mexico, civil rights and political freedom had been repressed to their lowest point. The former secretariat of national defence Lázaro Cárdenas was suspected of planning a possible coup d'etat, De Salas believed a coalition of politicians were planning to re-establish a democratic regime. He instituted a policy of immediate revision and forced the enactment of the Águila Dorada "Golden Eagle" policy. During this 5 year plan, the government would exercise the right for inspection and imprisonment of possible threats, mostly civilians and politicians linked to the democratic movement. A strategy of state-wide propaganda would lead Mexicans towards the party's goal and "clean" their image, this permitted De Salas to better appoint officials through his command while maintaining oppositions in line. Experts believe around 100,000 to 200,000 civilians and politicians were imprisoned, at least 300 executed and several institutions dismantled. This brought the exodus of at least 400,000 to 800,000 civilians during the 5 years, most emigrated to the United States and Spain.


Notable Members


Picture

Personnal Name

Official Title

Gender

Date of Birth (Age)

Shou Meihe | 寿美合

Gaoming Empress Regent | 高明女皇摄政王

Female

2 January 1989 (28)

Shou Xuelin | 寿雪林

Marquis of State | 侯爵国家

Female

14 August 1992 (25)

Shou Yahui | 寿雅惠

Marquis of State | 侯爵国家

Female

14 August 1992 (25)

Shou Chenling | 寿辰灵

Royal Prince of State | 国王

Male

25 December 1995 (22)

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