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DispatchAccountDiplomacy

by The Principality of Porpoise Isle. . 32 reads.

Second Grecian Convention on Maritime Activities [unratified]

Second Grecian Convention on Maritime Activities

This Resolution hereby declares that the Office of Regional Economics of the Grecian League to monitor the oceanic waters and maritime activities of the region of Grecia and the nations that inhabit it. This organization shall be overseer of the following maritime laws and regulations as well as any other activities that do not occur in any nationís national waters. If it wishes to delegate its duties, this resolution gives it the power to create the Grecian Maritime Organization which will assume all duties bestowed upon the Office of Regional Economics by this resolution and will consist of one member appointed by one of each of the member of the Office.

  1. Definition of Territorial Waters

  2. Legal Activities within Territory

  3. Obligations of Ship Owners

  4. Authority of Preservation of International Maritime Resources

  5. Salvage Law

The Regional Court of Grecia shall be made in charge of settling disputes involving maritime law, hosting an international maritime court, holding Grecian League nations responsible to the laws and regulations set forth in the resolution, and investigating possible infractions of this resolution if needed. In addition to the Regional Court of Grecia, it is expected that the militaries and police forces of the Grecian League nations to also aid in enforcing this resolution.

i. Definition of Territorial Waters

The formal boundaries of each coastal nation shall be outlined and defined by the Office of Regional Economics and will follow the listed definitions. Conflicting boundaries between nations shall be settled before the Regional Court of Grecia that will judge the situation and decide the proper definition of the borders of the conflicting nations.

  1. The Baseline

    1. The baseline is to be drawn along the low-water line of a coastal state.

    2. This baseline may be straight if the coast of a nation is deeply indented, has fringing islands or is highly unstable.

    3. This baseline may not be produced in a way that cuts off the territorial waters of another coastal state from the high seas or an exclusive economic zone.

  2. Archipelagic Waters

    1. A baseline shall be drawn from the outermost points of the outermost islands of an archipelago and the water within this baseline shall be known as archipelagic waters.

  3. Internal Waters

    1. Water that lie on the landward side of the baseline are classified as internal waters.

  4. Territorial Waters

    1. A zone extending 12 nautical miles (22 kilometers; 14 miles) from the baseline shall be classified as a coastal stateís territorial waters.

  5. Contiguous Zone

    1. A zone extending 12 nautical miles (22 kilometers; 14 miles) from the outermost edge of a stateís territorial waters shall be considered that nationís contiguous zone.

  6. Exclusive Economic Zone

    1. A zone extending 200 nautical miles (370 kilometres; 230 miles) from the baseline shall be classified as a coastal stateís exclusive economic zone.

  7. Continental Shelf

    1. The natural prolongation of the continental shelf to its outer edge, or to 200 nautical miles (370 kilometres; 230 miles), whichever is larger, shall be designated as a stateís continental shelf.

    2. While this zone may be larger than 200 nautical miles, it may never exceed 350 nautical miles (650 kilometres; 400 miles) from the baseline or 100 nautical miles (190 kilometres; 120 miles) beyond the 2,500-meter isobath.

  8. International Waters

    1. Waters outside of a nationís nationís territorial waters are recognized as international waters.

ii. Legal Activities within Territory

  1. Archipelagic Waters

    1. Archipelagic waters are under the complete sovereignty of their coastal state similar to internal waters.

    2. Foreign vessels do not have the right of innocent passage through archipelagic waters with the same limitations as territorial waters.

  2. Internal Waters

    1. The coastal state is free to set laws, regulate use, and use any resource.

    2. Foreign vessels do not have the right of innocent passage through these waters.

  3. Territorial Waters

    1. Nations have sovereignty over these waters and are free to set laws, regulate use, and use any resource within this zone.

    2. Foreign vessels are not allowed innocent passage through these waters unless the route to the high seas for a coastal nation would be inaccessible if innocent passage is not allowed.

    3. If deemed a threat to its security, a coastal nation may temporarily cancel the right to innocent passage. Afflicted nations may bring a case before the Regional Court of Grecia if they feel that this cancellation is not needed.

    4. Military vessels are allowed transit passage in the case of strategic straits which are determined by the Office of Regional Defense and with approval from the Regional Court of Grecia.

  4. Contiguous Zone

    1. Foreign vessels are allowed innocent passage through these waters.

    2. If deemed a threat to its security, a coastal nation may temporarily cancel the right to innocent passage. Afflicted nations may bring a case before the Regional Court of Grecia if they feel that this cancellation is not needed.

    3. Nations have jurisdiction over the following areas of laws if the infringement occurred or is about to occur in said nationís territory or territorial waters.

      • customs

      • taxation

      • immigration

      • pollution

    4. If a pursuit has not been interrupted, a foreign ship may be followed further into international waters by authorities if needed, but cannot be followed if the vessel enters the territorial sea of another nation.

  5. Exclusive Economic Zone

    1. The coastal state has sole exploitation rights over all natural resources such as fisheries, minerals, or energy production.

    2. Foreign states have the freedom of navigation subject to the regulation of the coastal state.

    3. Foreign states have freedom of overflight subject to the regulation of the coastal state.

    4. Foreign states may also lay submarine pipes and cables in this zone.

  6. Continental Shelf

    1. Only the coastal state is allowed to harvest mineral non-living material on the seabed and in the subsoil.

    2. Coastal states have exclusive control over living resources that are attached to the continental shelf.

    3. Coastal states do not have exclusive control over the living resources in the waters beyond that stateís exclusive economic zone.

  7. International Waters

    1. Every ship that travels internationally must have a flag state (and only one) that it is registered in.

    2. When in international waters, vessels operate under the jurisdiction of their flag nation.

    3. The flag nation is responsible for the administrative, technical and social matters over the ships flying its flags.

    4. Vessels partaking in certain illegal acts are considered to be under universal jurisdiction which can be exercised by any nation. They must then bring evidence and justification for their case or suspicion either to the Regional Court of Grecia or to the flag nation of the vessel who will then determine if the policing actions were justified. These illegal acts shall be listed below:

      1. Any act that would be a crime under the laws of the suspect vesselís flag nation.

      2. Theft from another vessel. The difference between theft and salvage is further clarified under Section v. Salvage Law.

      3. Causing physical harm to another vessel or its crew.

      4. Creating a legitimate threat to cause physical harm to another vessel or its crew.

      5. Boarding another vessel without that vesselís permission and not in the performance of a policing act.

    5. Resources outside of the jurisdiction of any nation are subject to jurisdiction of the Office of Regional Economics.

  8. Innocent Passage

    1. This the movement of a ship that is done in an expeditious and continuous manner and is done without malice against the good order or security of the coastal nation.

    2. Fishing, polluting, weapons practice, and spying do not qualify as innocent passage.

    3. Underwater vehicles are required to navigate on the surface and to show their flag.

    iii. Obligations of Ship Owners in International Waters

    These obligations are expected to be monitored both by the Office of Regional Economics and the flag nation(s) of the vessel(s) in question. In the list of laws and regulations below, ďvesselĒ refers to both the physical vessel as well as its master.

    1. The vessel will be in compliance of all laws and regulations of the flag nation that it flies under.

    2. The vessel will not interfere with submarine cables or pipelines while underway in international waters. If damages or interference are done to these objects, the vessel must show evidence that all precautions were taken to prevent these damages or that the lives of the crew were in immediate danger if the offending action was not taken or else the owner of the vessel will be fined compensation for the damages.

    3. The vessel will not cause damages to or place vessels in unneeded harm due to its negligence or malice. If damages are done to these objects by the offending vessel or because of its actions, the vessel must show evidence that all precautions were taken to prevent these damages or that the lives of the crew were in immediate danger if the offending action was not taken or else the owner of the vessel will be fined compensation for the damages. This law will mainly apply to vessels of different flag nations. Vessels of the same flag nation will in most cases will be subject to their own nationís laws on areas such as vessel collision.

    4. The vessel will be informed and have knowledge of all forms of possible signals of distress.

    5. The vessel must be knowledgeable in all of the navigation rules created by the Office of Regional Economics that prevent collisions at sea.

    6. If the vessel is carrying hazardous cargo or is nuclear powered, it must take all reasonably possible precautions to prevent the possibility of said materials to leak or be released into the sea.

    7. The owner of the vessel will be liable for any damages that occur due to the spilling or unloading of materials while at sea.The need for the action to have been taken to aid the safety of the crew will be taken into account for how much the owner of the vessel will be fined for damages.

    8. The vessel must comply with the standards and procedure of the Office of Regional Economics in regards to the management of their ballast water and sediments to minimize risks to the local ecosystems that they are in.

    9. The vessel will be informed and have knowledge of all regulations that pertain to it under international law.

    10. Neither the vessel nor its crew will perform actions that go against international laws or regulations.

    iv. Authority of Preservation of International Maritime Resources

    1. Living Resources
      For economic activities outside of national boundaries, the Office of Regional Economics shall monitor living resource levels such as fishery population numbers and regulate ownership of these resources to prevent clashes between nations over fishing rights as well as to prevent tragedy of the commons and ensuring that these resources are harvested at sustainable levels. Living resources that have sizeable migratory patterns between a nationís exclusive economic zone and international jurisdiction will be monitored by the Office of Regional Economics (although national monitoring is allowed and encouraged) which will aid the nationís fishery regulation in a purely advisory role. For living resources that have sizeable migratory patterns between a nationís exclusive economic zone and at least one other nationís exclusive economic zone, the Regional Court of Grecia will play an arbitrator for the two nations to form an agreement on the use of the resources and provide data and information to help decide a plan of action. Failing this, the Office of Regional Economics will step in and regulate the use of the resources in the most equal way possible with approval of their plan by the Regional Court of Grecia being required.

    2. Non-Living Resources
      For economic activities involving mineral exploitation outside of national jurisdiction, jurisdiction will fall upon the Office of Regional Economics as well as fall under the common heritage of mankind principle.

    v. Salvage Law

    If property is lost at sea and rescued by another, the rescuer is entitled to claim a salvage award on the salved property. There is no salvage when rescuing other humans as mariners are expected to not do this for a reward.

    1. Prize of War

      1. Warships captured by hostile forces do not apply to salvage law as they are prizes of war and can be kept.

      2. if they are recaptured by a friendly force, they are to be returned to the original owner as under salvage law.

    2. Contract Salvage

      1. The owner and the salver must have a written contract that specifies the amount that the salver will be paid for his or her services.

    3. Pure Salvage

      1. There is no contract between the owner and the salver. The salver must go to court to see how much he or she will be awarded based on the merit of the service, the value of the salvaged property, and how much money and effort was put into the salvaging process.

      2. If nothing is salvaged or additional damage is done, nothing will be paid.

      3. High-Risk Salvage

        • The salvager put people/equipment in danger in order to perform the salvage service.

        • ex: raising a ship from the seabed or towing a ship through a heavy storm.

      4. Low-Risk Salvage

        • The salvager faced little to no danger to equipment or personnel.

        • ex: towing a disabled vessel in calm waters.

    4. Treasure Salvage

      1. This is treasure that has remained submerged for a substantial amount of time (greater than one century).

      2. As opposed to the other forms of salvage, the majority of the salvaged material will go to the salvager, not the owner.

The Principality of Porpoise Isle

Edited:

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