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The Valentian Education System - In a painstrickingly high detail by subjects and years – By Vice Foresittend Jolyn.

OOC: As always, picture credits in each link.

The current education system is ran and well-maintained by Vice Foresittend Jolyn Maxine Caulfield Moira “Неуловимая, Женщина-шпион” Marlene Wendy Lucille Lapis Jill Khorosheva Vin. Zolina łnt. Natasha Vasilisa Helen Ceeta Tescelyn Maximovna, Vice-President of Victoriaans Nederlands, and Superintendent of Valentian Education System / Ministry of Education. This work, in part, is written from the perspective of Jolyn, with both facts and figures, and Jolyn's comment on her various decisions.

The years stated here are in Valentian’s Decimal Time System, and thus would explain the broader range of subjects and the complexity that are associated with them.
1 Decimal Year = 3.16 Earth Years. From Kindergarten to Polytechnic (longest route), an average Valentian spends a good 6.50 Decimal Years in Valentian Schools, which translates to around 20.5 Old Earth Years.

Perhaps it might be considered too long for most outsiders, but rest-assured that the Valentian children indeed enjoy the schooling years of their lives.

Kindergarten – 1.0 Decimal Year


Description: To jumpstart the cognitive and development of a Valentian child, the government-run kindergartens teaches kids the very foundations and basics of each of the languages:


The very basics and alphabets of English and Valkyrie Sprak, as well as some common words and sentences. The starting point for many children, and for communication, of course!



Basics of handwriting and stroke practice. There is no single standard for handwriting, and both cursive and block letters are encouraged, with the kids being allowed and accepted to have their own style of writing. It is simply a matter of practice to develop motor skills.



Mathematics: Numbers from 1 to 10 for the first year, followed by 1 to 20, along with simple arithmetics (+, –, x, χ) for the second year.



General playtime, which simply aims to let kids further develop their motor skills.


Primary School – 2 Decimal Years – 400 Decimal Days / semester * 5 semesters


Description: To further teach the basics of the world around them, as well as to equip them with basic literacy skills to get around in everyday life. Mother Tongue is also chosen at this point, with a choise of a thousand languages with at least a hundred teachers for the rarer languages.

  • Primary 1: More words are added as compared to Kindergarten, as well as slightly more complex sentences, and the ability to read simple sentences. The very basics of grammar are also taught, such as verbs, adjectives, nouns, etc.

  • Primary 2: More words are added, as well as the extension on the grammatical structure of each of the languages. Simple stories not more than 200 words are to be read and to answer a few questions based on them (Reading Comprehension).

  • Primary 3: More words are added, as well as the extension on the grammatical structure of each of the languages. Slightly more complex stories not more than 1000 words are to be read and to answer a few questions based on them (Reading Comprehension). Synthesis and Transformation is also added (to be able to rephrase a sentence while keeping the meaning the same, or otherwise).

  • Primary 4: More words are added, as well as the extension on the grammatical structure of each of the languages. Slightly more complex stories not more than 1200 words are to be read and to answer a few questions based on them (Reading Comprehension). Synthesis and Transformation becomes much more complex, and interpretation of real-life elements such as emails, advertisements, forms, letter-writing, etc.

  • Primary 5: More words are added, as well as the extension on the grammatical structure of each of the languages. Complex stories not more than 2000 words are to be read and to answer questions based on them (Reading Comprehension). Synthesis and Transformation becomes much more complex, and interpretation of real-life elements such as emails, advertisements, forms, letter-writing, etc. become vague in nature.


  • Primary 1: Numbers from 1 to 100, as well as the extension on the simple arithmetic skills and basic forms of fractions.

  • Primary 2: Numbers from 1 to 1000, as well as the extension on the simple arithmetic skills and slightly more complex forms of fractions, as well as simple forms of exponents (22, for example).

  • Primary 3: Numbers from 1 to 1,000,000 (one million), as well as the extension on the simple arithmetic skills and more complex forms of fractions, as well as simple forms of exponents (22, for example), surds, very basic forms of statistics (reading graphs and interpreting data). Simple Geometry is also introduced at this point.

  • Primary 4: Numbers from 1 to 1,000,000,000 (one billion), as well as the extension on the simple arithmetic skills and more complex forms of fractions, as well as simple forms of exponents (22, for example), surds, very basic forms of statistics (reading graphs and interpreting data). Negative numbers, decimals, finance are also introduced, though for finance, it’s a matter of adding taxes, negative and positive balances, and very simple forms of interest rates. Algebra is also introduced. Geometry extends to 3 dimensions.

  • Primary 5: Numbers from 1 to 1,000,000,000,000 (one trillion), as well as the extension on the simple arithmetic skills and more complex forms of fractions, as well as simple forms of exponents (22, for example), surds, very basic forms of statistics (reading graphs and interpreting data). Negative numbers, decimals, finance are also introduced, though for finance, it’s a matter of adding taxes, negative and positive balances, and more complex forms of interest rates. Algebra is extended upon, as well as calculus and trigonometry being taught at a very basic level. Geometry becomes much more complex.


  • Primary 1: The difference between push and pull, basics of gravity, levers at work, measurements and units.

  • Primary 2: Forces and dynamics at work, engineers in real life.

  • Primary 3: Kinematics, Forces, and Dynamics are focused and taught on, while simple calculations and unit conversions are also covered.

  • Primary 4: More complex problems and calculations on Kinematics, Forces, and Dynamics. Heat Systems are introduced, such as the methods of Convection, Convention, and Radiation.

  • Primary 5: Simple calculations of Heat Systems and methods of heat transfer are taught, as well as the basics of Nuclear Physics and dangers of nuclear power.


  • Primary 1: Reading hazardous symbols and notes, safety with chemicals, 3 states of materials, basics of elements, mixtures and compounds.

  • Primary 2: Simple reactions, reading the Periodic Table of Elements.

  • Primary 3: More complex reactions, as well as a small introduction to the well-known and common elements (Group I, Group II, Group VI, Group VII).

  • Primary 4: More complex reactions, as well as slightly more in-depth introduction to the well-known and common elements (Group I, Group II, Group VI, Group VII).

  • Primary 5: More complex reactions, and introduction to very basic forms of organic chemistry.


  • Primary 1: Basic systems of a body, concept of cells, difference between plant and human cells.

  • Primary 2: Slightly more complex systems of a body, looking into each of the systems in-depth.

  • Primary 3: Slightly more complex systems of a body, looking into each of the systems in-depth. Adaptation, survival instincts, and more about the animal kingdom in-depth.

  • Primary 4: More complex systems of a body, looking into each of the systems in-depth. Basic life skills are also taught, such as identifying animals and plants that are hazardous or beneficial to the humans or the ecosystem.

  • Primary 5: More complex systems of a body, looking into each of the systems in-depth, as well as very basic introduction to Medicines that are deemed useful to everyday life. Introduction to DNA.


  • Primary 3: This is where Programming is first introduced to students! A new subject added in for Primary 3 students, this class and subject will equip students with the very fundamentals of programming, using Psuedocode and simple English commands in order to portray a code. Not much information is given on the code structures just yet, and instead is an introduction to logic synthesis.

  • Primary 4: Extension from Primary 3. Introduction to Python, and using said language to solve programming problems. The basics of the language are taught, as well as the in-depth study of logic synthesis.

  • Primary 5: Extension from Primary 4. More on logic synthesis, as well as intermediate implementation to Python, and using said language to solve programming problems. The logic synthesis becomes much more complex.


  • Primary 3: The summary of pre-Valentian eras are taught, ranging from prehistoric eras, to ancient civilizations (from Babylonians and Mayans, to Romans, Egyptians, and Greeks).

  • Primary 4: Extension of Primary 3, more in-depth and focuses on a later time periods, such as the Classical, Medieval, and Gunpowder Ages.

  • Primary 5: Extension of Primary 4, more in-depth and focuses on a later time periods, such as the Industrial Age, World Wars, Cold War, and the Valentian Era.


  • Primary 3: The basic aspects of the physical geography are taught, such as Earth’s ecosystem, physical features, layers of Earth, coastlines.

  • Primary 4: Extension of Primary 3, more in-depth and focuses on more features of physical Earth, as well as a quick introduction to Human Geography.

  • Primary 5: Extension of Primary 4, more in-depth and focuses on more features of physical Earth, as well as much more complex interpretations and concepts of Human Geography.



Primary School Leaving Examination – PSLE – Taken at the end of Primary 5. Hours here refer to Old Earth System's Hour.

  • English, Valkyrie Sprak, and a chosen Mother Tongue: Consists of 4 papers. Each paper is divided into its own sections:

    • Paper One – Essays and Situational Writing – 3 hours.

      • Section A consists of Situational Writing, whereby a candidate will be asked to write a response-based entry based on either formats: E-mail, letter of complaint/appraisal, advertisements, etc. No more than 300 words.

      • Section B consists of essay writing, whereby 5 prompts are given, and the candidate will have to write an essay based on the prompt. No more than 800 words.

    • Paper Two – Grammar and Reading Comprehension – 2.5 hours.

      • Section A consists of grammatical components, such as identifying errors, synthesis and transformation, being given a passage with missing words to add relevant verbs, nouns, or adjectives.

      • Section B consists of a piece of media, be it an email, letter, a piece of advertisement, amongst many others. The idea is to infer and interpret the media, and answer 5 questions based on them.

      • Section C consists of a piece of unseen prose or a passage, extracted from a piece of work. The passage has 2000 – 2500 words, and there are 10 questions to answer based on the passage, as well as a Summary component, where the candidates will have to condense a part of a passage into 150 words or fewer.

    • Paper Three – Listening Comprehension – 30 minutes.

      • 3 extracts of conversation or otherwise will be played, each of them 9 minutes long. There are 10 questions for each extract, totalling at 30 questions.

    • Paper Four – Oral Examination – 15+ minutes.

      • Section A – Reading aloud. A passage no more than 200 words are given, and the candidate has to read it aloud without errors, while taking emphasis on the stresses, pauses, and tones.

      • Section B – Picture Discussion. A picture is given of an everyday life, sometimes normal, sometimes not. Using linguistic cues, the candidate must be able to infer what is happening in the photo.

      • Section C – Conversation. Two examiners will ask the candidate a few questions, trying to use as few prompts as possible along the way. The idea is to be able to answer and expand/evaluate upon the questions asked.

  • Mathematics: Consists of 2 papers. Each paper is divided into its own sections:

    • Paper One – Short Structured Questions – 2 hours. Calculator is not allowed for this paper.

      • Section A consists of 30 multiple-choice questions (MCQs), whereby a candidate is to choose a correct option out of the 4. The questions are set such that the numbers are easier to evaluate and derive, since the usage of calculators are not allowed.

      • Section B consists of 30 short questions, nearly the same as the MCQs, except that the answer can be written out freely, from integers, to decimals, to a few words of explanation (e.g. to describe the statistical trend). It aims to test the concepts of Mathematics as a whole.

    • Paper Two – Free-Response Questions – 3 hours. Calculators are allowed for this paper.

      • The paper only has one section, and consists of 10-12 questions, with each questions spanning several parts. The questions have no specific answering format, and the candidates are free to answer them in any way they wish, so long as proper working and effort was shown in answering them. The questions can span from several topics, i.e. several topics can be tested in one question. Formulaes are also given, as the idea of the examination is to test the candidates’ understanding and utilisation of the forumlas and mathematical concepts, instead of relying on rote memory to recall formulas to use them. As a result, the questions are not as straightforward compared to Paper One.

  • General Science: Consists of 2 papers. The triple subjects – Physics, Chemistry, and Biology, are all combined into a single subject for the sake of testing.

    • Paper One – Multiple-Choice Questions – 1.5 hours. Calculators are allowed for this paper.

      • Consisting of 60 questions, Paper One aims to test the general knowledge and understanding of the key concepts of the three fields. 20 questions are allocated for each subject, i.e. 20 for Physics, 20 for Chemistry, and 20 for Biology.

    • Paper Two – Structured Questions – 2.5 hours. Calculators are allowed for this paper.

      • Section A consists of 18 short-structured questions, whereby 3 are allocated for Physics, 3 for Chemistry, and 3 for Biology. The short-structured questions are more or less the same in terms of evaluativeness and complexity compared to the Paper One questions. Section A aims to test the candidates on basic understanding, along with answering a sentence or two or a few steps of calculations, or both.

      • Section B consists of 9 open-ended questions – 3 for Physics, 3 for chemistry, 3 for Biology. The candidate has to choose only one from each subject category, that is, one Physics question, one Chemistry question, and one Biology question. The questions not only test the candidate’s understanding of scientific terms and concepts, but also aims to test their evaluative and reasoning skills, i.e. to be able to explain the processes in detail, as well as being able to answer real-life scenarios based on the science that they have learned thus far. The questions may have a sentence or two describing what is expected of the candidate, but otherwise, there is no strict formatting to follow.

  • Introduction to Programming: Consists only of one paper, with the format as follows:

    • Main Exam – 3 hours. Calculators are allowed for this paper. Section A and B are written (A done in Optical Answering Sheet, B done on answer booklet), while C is typed.

      • Section A consists of 25 MCQs, which tests the candidate’s knowledge on basic Python terms, as well as on simple logic synthesis (AND, OR, NAND, XOR, etc.).

      • Section B consists of 12 short-structured questions, whereby the candidates are to fill in missing logic operators, snippets of Python codes (with correct formatting), amongst many others.

      • Section C consists of 5 programming questions, but the candidates only have to select 3 questions to answer. The questions are open-ended as some parts, while at others, there are stricter guidelines or conditions to follow. The aim is to follow the instructions and finish little snippets of codes, as well as to be able to create an application with the help of the list of instructions in the question paper. These questions are on paper, but the candidates will be given an examination laptop in order to type the code inside. The laptop has no access to the internet outside, but it has documentation on Python itself, as well as a few other aids that the students will find useful.

  • Introduction to Geography: Consists only of one paper, with the format as follows:

    • Main Exam – 2.5 hours. Calculators are allowed for this paper.

      • Section A consists of 4 short-structured questions whereby the answering format was more or less fixed, and candidates are mainly tested on their understanding of several geographical concepts. Consists of 2 Physical Geography questions, as well as 2 Human Geography questions. For Human Geography, candidates are expected to perform simple arithmetic calculations, as well as to be able to read trends that might be present in the graphs given.

      • Section B consists of open-ended questions for Physical Geography. There are 3 questions to choose from, and the candidate only has to choose one question to answer. The questions are, as aforementioned, are asking of much more evaluation, not only testing the students on the concepts and basic understanding, but additionally on their interpretation skills, as well as argumentative skills.

      • Section C consists of open-ended questions for Human Geography. There are 3 questions to choose from, and the candidate only has to choose one question to answer. The questions are, as aforementioned, are asking of much more evaluation, not only testing the students on the concepts and basic understanding, but additionally on their interpretation skills, as well as argumentative skills.

  • Introduction to History: Consists only of one paper, with the format as follows:

    • Main Exam – 2.5 hours.

      • Section A consists of 6 short-structured questions whereby the answering format was more or less fixed, and candidates are mainly tested on their understanding of several historical concepts, as well as methods of interpretation. The candidates will be tested on two historical events, both of which will be chosen randomly. There are 3 questions on each event, with accompanying sources for reading and interpretation. Candidates’ abilities to identify biased, skewed, or inaccurate sources will also be tested in the background (may not be outright tested, but it plays a part in getting higher marks).

      • Section B consists of open-ended questions for Physical Geography. There are 3 questions to choose from, and the candidate only has to choose one question to answer. The questions are, as aforementioned, are asking of much more evaluation, not only testing the students on the concepts and basic understanding, but additionally on their interpretation skills, as well as argumentative skills.


Secondary School – 2 Decimal Years – 400 Decimal Days / semester * 5 semesters


To be added.

Tertiary Education – Junior College – 1 Decimal Year – 500 Decimal Days / semester * 2 semesters


To be added.

Tertiary Education – Polytechnic – 1.50 Decimal Year – 3-4 Terms of Studies


To be added.

University – Undergraduate – 1.60 Decimal Year – 200 Decimal Days / semester * 8 semesters


To be added.

University – Postgraduates – 0.20 – 0.40 Decimal Year – 100 Decimal Days / semester * 2 to 4 semesters


To be added.

Life Skill Courses – Throughout Schooling Years


To be added.


Report