by Max Barry

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The Kingdom of
Conservative Democracy

Overview Factbook Dispatches Policies People Government Economy Rank Trend Cards

2

2019 Federal Election Results


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Leader

Lev Patérnon

Góltyr Sűlon

Púĝa Báslin

Vénir Þébanin

Party

National Christian Alliance

Liberal

Labor

Tarvelian People's

General Position

Right-wing

Centre-right

Centre

Far-right

Votes

1 492 325

804 231

481 025

312 486

Seats Won

250

113

68

43

Seats Before

0 (First Election)

196

80

44

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Leader

Matíld Ďerevŝénko

Sárgun Egüptomárjan

Þjólvyk Évgenin

Wílqoz Nastášon

Party

Radical

Moderate

New Democratic

Sopti Independence

General Position

Centre-left/left-wing

Centre-right/Centre

Centre

Far-right

Votes

101 254

98 521

41 425

8 205

Seats Won

5

2

1

1

Seats Before

22

44

8

1


Tarvelia's election was a break from the norm. From a western lens, it appears that the only difference between the previous ruling party and the current is that the new one openly favors Russia to western Europe and America as allies. Otherwise, it was yet another election seemingly between two conservatives.

However, at home, it was seen as the most divisive election in Tarvelian history. Oddly this story did not start in Tarvelia. It started in Ukraine. "Meddling" has been a popular buzzword in western democracies recently, and for different reasons it has too in Tarvelia. For the very religious Tarvelian electorate, the Constantinople-Moscow schism in the Eastern Orthodox communion was seen as a result of political meddling in things that should be holy, and the result of the election would determine where most of the blame would be placed. Apparently, the voters blamed the West.

Of course, Góltyr Sűlon's incompetence as the Liberal leader definitely had a role in his overseeing the utter destruction of what was once considered the Tarvelian party of power. Instead of carefully outlining the Liberal's classic policy of selective westernization, his campaign consisted of knee-jerk reactions to Lev Patérnon's proposals, and banking in on Tarvelia's strong anti-Soviet sentiment residual of the 20th century. His exuberant praise of the western values perhaps made Sűlon appear more to the left than he was, and he saw many Liberal MPs endorse Patérnon in his stead. His style did not help him either. While Patérnon's manner was soft-spoken and collected, Sűlon tried to play to charisma he did not realize he lacked. Perhaps the Liberals can find their way past Sűlon, and return to grace under more competent leadership.

With the primary issue in a Tarvelian election being foreign policy, the Labor party saw itself along pro-Western and pro-Russian lines, with the latter forming a merger of Patérnon's National Christian Union to form, with a slight change in branding, the National Christian Alliance. With two swaths of defectors from the two largest parties in the country was enough to see the Patérnon's coalition dominate in the Federal Election. The shift to the two large contenders saw the near-collapse of the medium-sized political parties - with the Radicals and Moderates being all but gutted, with the province of Þáron's controversial raising of its electoral threshold to ten percent only playing a small role in their decline. Notably, the Tarvelian People's Party has managed to avert cataclysm through what appears to be the sheer stubbornness of its voters, and has found itself in a governing coalition for the first time in its history.

To vote, one must be a natural-born or naturalized citizen age 17 (Tarvelian age of majority) or older. All balots are paper. While unicameral, the Tarvelian parliament does not vote as a single body - therefore, the results of the subchambers are more important than the results of the entire parliament. A block in any subchamber can serve as a veto. Though, the general subchamber's results alone determine the chancery. The new parliament was sworn in on 1 January, 2020.

General Subchamber Results
The general subchamber represents the 150 members of the Tarvelian parliament elected nationwide using proportional representation (more specifically, the d'Hondt method). A party must achieve a three percent threshold to gain representation in this subchamber. Since this is the only subchamber in which one person-one vote applies to a proportion electorate, final vote tallies are based of this specific election.

Total Results

Government
National Christian Alliance: 250
Tarvelian People's Party: 43
Opposition
Liberal Party: 113
Labor: 68
Radicals: 5
Moderate Party: 2
New Democrats: 1
Sopti Independence Party: 1
Independents: 2
Non-Partisan Position: 25


NCA
1 492 325 (71 seats)

Liberal Party
804 231 (38 seats)

Labor
481 025 (23 seats)

Tarvelian People's Party
312 486 (14)

Radicals
101 254 (4)

Moderate Party
98 521 (0)

New Democrats
41 425 (0)

Other Parties
10 349 (0)

The NCA will likely have control over this subchamber with the confidence of the TPP, and certain members of the Liberal Party, depending on the nature of the individual vote.

Trustee's Subchamber Results
This subchamber represents the 150 members of the Tarvelian parliament representing single-member constituencies. These constituencies are drawn by population, and each currently represent a population of approximately 70,000. The method of voting is range voting, in which a voter ranks each candidate from 0-9, and and each point translates into a vote.

NCA
83 Seats

Liberal Party
41 Seats

Labor
17 Seats

Tarvelian People's Party
7 Seats

Independents
2 Seats

Radicals
0 Seats

Moderate Party
0 Seats

New Democrats
0 Seats

While this was probably the most unusual election in Tarvelia since its independence, the result for this subchamber still stands out as odd. While range voting typically doesn't result in fewer party showings, the especially divisive nature of this election resulted in more stark rankings per voter and fewer parties represented in these constituencies.

Provincial Subchamber
This subchamber is intended to represent the nine provinces of Tarvelia equally, regardless of population. It consists of 185 members: 20 per province, and 5 for the federal city of Séljeved. Members elected in province-wide election using the d'Hondt voting method. An x-factor in this subchamber is that individual provinces set the electoral threshold.

NCA
96 Seats

Liberal Party
34

Labor
28 Seats

Tarvelian People's Party
22 Seats

Radicals
1 Seat

Moderate Party
2 Seats

New Democrats
1 Seat

Sopti Independence Party
1 Seat

This chamber favors smaller provinces, and as such the perennial candidate of the Sopti Indepence Party from the country's smallest province has always been able to win his seat. Due to an increase in the electoral threshold in Þáron, the province's two dependable radical seats were lost to more popular parties therein, with the party's sole member hailing from Ḳamstét. The NCA has achieved a supermajority in this subchamber.


Fmr. Chancellor Terís Krej, now Senator of Ḳamstét.

Federal Subchamber
This ten-member (and technically non-partisan) subchamber is not directly elected. The "senators" are appointed by provincial parliaments to represent their governments and one member is appointed by the Tarvelian royal family. With the provincial elections in Ḳamstét and Þáron flipping from Liberal to NCA with the defects to the latter by both the Liberals and Labor, and Bárca and Nórodin flipping from a labor government to ones headed by the NCA, three new appointees are expected for the subchamber who favor the policies of the new NCA government.

Despite the NCA unseating the long-governing Liberals in Ḳamstét, the NCA in that province has nontheless promised to appoint the retiring Liberal chancellor Terís Krej as its representative. It has more or less been tradition for chancellors to be appointed to be their home-province's representative. There are two other former chancellors in this subchamber.

The NCA's government is expected to have five members who were explicit supporters of its party, and given the chancellor's power to break ties, this all but assures the Patérnon's control in this bloc. Krej, despite her affiliation, is expected to be a supporter of most domestic agenda of the NCA, and some of its foreign policy. She was noted for not endorsing her party's candidate. Being only a ten member subchamber that can block any legislation in the parliament, Krej will still have an impressive influence on the government.

Other Subchambers
The Commerce, Clerical, and Military Subchambers members are determined largely outside the scope of the Federal Election. The Commerce Subchamber is expected to have its caucuses later in the year, and my provide some resistance to the more regulatory nature of the NCA's agenda. Otherwise, these subchambers typically have trusted the judgement of the government. The Clerical and Military subchambers have only been seen as a potential veto for the agenda of an unlikely, hypothetical Radical government.

Outcome
While falling short of a majority (no party, federally, has ever received an absolute majority in the Tarvelian politics), the NCA made a strong debut as the successor to the NCU. Having attracted defectors from both the Liberal and Labor parties, it has secured itself as a socially-conservative, fiscally-centrist, pro-Eastern political party. TPP leader Vénir Þébanin has been appointed deputy chancellor, and Ulíj Telnévin has replaced Sűlon as the leader of the Liberals, and is expected to be less divisive to the new governing party than her predecessor.

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