by Max Barry

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The Neue Kaiserliche Ordnung of
Corporate Police State

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1

Overview of the Reorganized Government of Germany

Großgermanisches Reich der Deutschen Nation
Greater Germanic Reich of the German Nation


Flag


Motto: Gott mitt uns



Location


Population: 131,000,000 (1,131,000,000)
Density:


Capital: Berlin
Largest City: Berlin


Official Language: German



National Language: German


Demonym: German, Germans

Government:
Unitary Nazi single party totalitarian dictatorship
(1933-1944)
Unitary single party totalitarian dictatorship
(1944-1980)
Unitary absolute monarchy under a
totalitarian dictatorship (1980-present)

Heads of State:
- Adolf Hitler (as Führer) - 1933-1944
- Ludwig Beck (as Reichspräsident) - 1944
- Karl Dönitz (as Reichsverweser) - 1944-1980
Emperor/Empress:
- Victoria Louise - 1944-1980
- Louis Ferdinand - 1980-1994
- Wilhelm III - 1994-present
Crown Prince:
- Wilhelm - 1944-1952
- Louis Ferdinand - 1952-1980
- Friedrich Wilhelm - 1980-1994
- James Helmut (attainted) - 1994-2017
- Luitpold - 2017-present

Chancellor:
- Adolf Hitler - 1933-1944
- Carl Friedrich Goerdeler - 1944
- Lutz Graf Schwerin von Krosgik - 1944-1977
- Rudolf Hess - 1977-1987
- Rudolf Erzherzog von Habsburg- 1987-2017
- Gebhard Fürst von Bismarck - 2017-present


Legislature:
- Upper house: Reichsrat (suspended)
- Lower house: Reichstag (suspended)


Establishment:
Deutsches Reich: 18 January 1871 - present
- Weimar Republic: 9 November 1918 - 30 January 1933
- Drittes Reich: 30 January 1933 - 24 December 1980
- Hohenzollern Restoration: 24 December 1980 - present


Land Area: km²
Water Area: km²
Water %:


Elevation
Highest Point:
Lowest Point:


GDP (nominal): $9.375 trillion
GDP (nominal) per capita: $71,564


Human Development Index: 0.947


Currency: Reichsmark


Time Zone: GMT +1


Drives on the: Right


Calling code: +49


Internet TLD: .de


Germany, officially known as the German Reich (Deutsches Reich) and fully styles as the Greater Germanic Reich of the German Nation (Großgermanisches Reich der Deutschen Nation) is the German state after Adolf Hitler and the Third Reich, the previous German state, were defeated by the Allied Powers. Under Hitler's rule, Germany was a totalitarian state where nearly all aspects of life were controlled by the government, and this state of affairs continued for the successor state as soon as possible to do so, albeit under the aegis of the Hohenzollern monarchy in a aristocratic-paternalistic Ancien Régime. The moniker Fourth Reich (Viertes Reich) – meaning "Fourth Realm" or "Fourth Empire" – alluded to the idea that the renewed Imperial Germany was the successor to the earlier Holy Roman Empire (800–1806), German Empire (1871–1918) and Nazi Germany (1933-1945). The Fourth Reich is still referred to as the Thousand Year Reich (Tausendjähriges Reich).

Government



The politics of Germany takes place in the context of a totalitarian absolute monarchy, where the Kaiser is both the head of state and government. Decisions are, to a large extent, made on the basis of consultation among the senior members of the nobility and the military establishment. As an absolute monarchy, the Greater Germanic Reich of the German Nation has no constitution. With the bicameral legislature suspended indefinitely, for all intents and purposes Germany has no separate legislative body, a feature shared with the Vatican and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The government is lead by the monarch, the Kaiser (emperor). Elections and political parties are outlawed. The monarch combines executive, legislative and judiciary functions, and imperial decrees form the basis of legislation. However, the judiciary remains nominally independent of the executive branch. The Aulic Council, which is the court with the highest precedence in the German legal system, is responsible for resolving disputes of noble succession, including those involving the imperial house.

The Kaiser rules Germany autocratically by asserting the Führerprinzip ("leader principle"), which calls for absolute obedience of all subordinates. The government structure is viewed as a pyramid, with the Kaiser —the leader by divine right—at the apex. Positions were filled through appointment by those of higher rank. While top officials reported to the Kaiser and followed his policies, they possessed considerable autonomy. Officials were expected to "work towards the Kaiser" – to take the initiative in promoting policies and actions in line with state goals and the wishes of the monarch, without his involvement in day-to-day decision-making. The government is dominated by the Prussian nobility, with the ruling House of Hohenzollern om top, and the military and security establishment, which has often been divided by internal disputes and into factions. The members of the nobility, along with the leadership of the military and security establishment, are the principal political actors allowed by the government.

The Kaiser is not the chancellor, who presides over the Privy Cabinet Council and handles the day-to-day details of governance, while the Kaiser forms a long-term vision for Germany with input from the royal court. However, the Kaiser makes appointments to and dismissals from the Council, which is responsible for such executive and administrative matters as foreign and domestic policy, defense, finance, health, and education, administered through numerous separate agencies. The chancellor also presides over a bicameral legislature, the Reichstag (Diet of the Realm). The Reichstag is subdivided into two houses, the Reichsrat (upper house) and the Reichstag (lower house). This body nominally exists but is permanently suspended.

Administrative Divisions



Germany is nominally subdivided into several states, each of which is administered by the traditional monarch as head of state and an official known as the Reichstaathalter (Reich Governor) as the head of government. As the ruling house of Germany is also the ruling house of Prussia, Prussia is directly controlled by the central government. These states are subdivided further into provinces known as Gaue (shires). The governors of the Gaue are officials known as the Gauleiters. These are officials appointed by the central government in Berlin to carry out the actual territorial administration, making the Gaue in effect the de facto territorial division of Germany. If a state consists of only a single Gau, the Gauleiter is also the Reichstaathalter for that state.

Central Administration

  • Kingdom of Prussia

    • Gau Cologne-Aachen - Formed from the north-central part of the Province of the Rhine

    • Gau Düsseldorf - Formed from the northern half of the Province of the Rhine

    • Gau East Prussia - Formed from the Province of East Prussia and the Free City of Danzig

    • Gau Eastern Hannover - Formed from the northern, central, and eastern parts of the Province of Hanover

    • Gau Electoral Hesse - formed from the territory of the former Province of Electoral Hesse

    • Gau Essen - formed from the northern tip of the Province of the Rhine

    • Gau Greater Berlin - formed from Greater Berlin

    • Gau Hamburg - formed from the Free Hanseatic City of Hamburg

    • Gau Halle-Meserburg - formed from the souther half of the Province of Saxony

    • Gau Hohenzollern - formed from the Province of Hohenzollern

    • Gau Koblenz-Trier - formed from the southern half of the Province of the Rhine

    • Gau Lower Silesia - formed from the Province of Lower Silesia

    • Gau Madgeburg - formed from the Province of Saxony

    • Gau March of Brandenburg - formed from the Province of Brandenburg

    • Gau Nassau - formed from the territory of the former Province of Nassau

    • Gau Pomerania - formed from the Province of Pomerania

    • Gau Saar - formed from the Prussian Saarland

    • Gau Schleswig-Holstein - formed from the Province of Schleswig-Holstein and the Free City of Lübeck

    • Gau Southern Hannover - formed from the southern and western parts of the Province of Hannover

    • Gau Upper Silesia - formed from the Province of Upper Silesia

    • Gau Weser-Ems - formed from the far western part of the Province of Hanover and the Free Hanseatic City of Bremen

    • Gau Westphalia North - formed from the northern half of the Province of Westphalia

    • Gau Westphalia South - formed from the southern half of the Province of Westphalia

  • Kingdom of Bavaria

    • Gau Bayreuth - Formed from the eastern part of Bavaria

    • Gau Franconia - Formed from the central part of Bavaria

    • Gau Main-Franconia - Formed from the northwestern part of Bavaria

    • Gau Munich-Upper Bavaria - Formed from the southeastern part of Bavaria

    • Gau Swabia - Formed from the southwestern part of Bavaria

  • Kingdom of Saxony

    • Gau Saxony - administers the territory of the Kingdom of Saxony

  • Kingdom of Württemberg

    • Gau Württemberg - administers the territory of the Kingdom of Württemberg

  • Archduchy of Austria

    • Gau Carinthia - administers the territory of the Duchy of Carinthia

    • Gau Lower Danube - administers the territory of the Archduchy of Lower Austria

    • Gau Salzburg - administers the territory of the Duchy of Salzburg

    • Gau Styria - administers the territory of the Duchy of Styria

    • Gau Tyrol-Vorarlberg - administers the territory of the Princely County of Tyrol with Vorarlberg

    • Gau Upper Danube - administers the territory of the Archduchy of Upper Austria

    • Gau Vienna - administers Vienna

  • State of Thuringia

    • Gau Thuringia - administers the small duchies and principalities of Thuringia

  • Grand Duchy of Baden

    • Gau Baden - administers the territory of the Grand Duchy of Baden

  • Grand Duchy of Hesse

    • Gau Hesse - administers the territory of the Grand Duchy of Hesse

  • Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin

    • Gau Mecklenburg - administers the territory of the Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg-Schwerin and that of the Grand Duchy of Mecklenburg-Strelitz after a succession dispute

  • Grand Duchy of Oldenburg

    • Gau Oldenburg - administers the territory of the Grand Duchy of Oldenburg

  • Duchy of Anhalt

    • Gau Anhalt - administers the territory of the Duchy of Anhalt

  • Duchy of Brunswick

    • Gau Brunswick - administers the territory of the Duchy of Brunswick

  • Principality of Lippe - the Gauleiter Westphalia-North is also the Reichstaathalter of Lippe

  • Principality of Schaumburg-Lippe - the Gauleiter Westphalia-North is also the Reichstaathalter of Schaumburg-Lippe

Autonomous Regions
  • Reich Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia

    • Gau Sudetenland - administers the German speaking part of the former Czech lands

    • State of Bohemia - administers the rest of Bohemia

    • State of Moravia - administers the rest of Moravia and Czech Silesia

  • Reich Protectorate of Helvetia - administers the territory of Switzerland.

  • Principality of Liechenstein - territory of Liechenstein upon reincorporation with Germany.

Unincorporated territories
  • Reich Commissariat for the Occupied Norwegian Territories - administers the city of LinkNordstern, the LinkSvalbard Archipelago and Jan Mayen Island.

  • Reich Commissariat for the German Antarctic Territories - administers the German Antarctic territorial claims.

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