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Prime Minister of Wagondia


Prime Minister
Primeiro Ministro
Premier Ministre
Primer Ministro




Prime Minister of Wagondia

Incumbent
Fradique Barrachina
since 1 December 2018

Official Details

Style: The Right Honourable (formal)
His/Her Excellency (diplomatic)
Status: Head of Government
Reports to: Chamber of Deputies
Her Austral and Imperial Majesty Carmen I
Residence: Maynard Palace (official)
Fazenda Catajás (country home)
Seat: Babilônia-Camerino
Term Length: At Her Majesty's Pleasure
Inagural Holder: Antonio José de Sucre
Formation: 15 July 1826
Salary: $440,000 per annum
Personal Details

Born: Fradique Pedro d'Abreu Barrachina
27 December, 1960 (age 60)
Vitória, Brazil, Wagondia
Political Party: Wagain Labour Party (PWT)
Spouse: Marta Carrasco Brandwein (m. 1991)
Children: Helena, Joana
Alma Mater: University of Espírito Santo (BA)
Occupation: Journalist, politician
Awards: Bithorn Prize (1996, 2001)

The Prime Minister of Wagondia (informally abbreviated to PM) is the head of government of the Empire of Wagondia and the commander in chief of the Wagain Armed Forces. The prime minister is appointed by the Empress of Wagondia after being designated by the Chamber of Deputies, and must enjoy the confidence of the lower house to remain in office. The prime minister directs both the executive and the legislature, and together with their Cabinet is accountable to the monarch, to Parliament, to their party, and ultimately to the electorate, for the government's policies and actions. Under the Wagain constitution, all of the power to exercise these activities is actually vested in the monarch, but in practice the Empress (who is the head of state) approves them routinely, and exercises their power only under the advice of the prime minister. The prime minister has two official residences: Maynard Palace in Santa Catalina and Fazenda Catajás in Taiobeiras, 140km outside the national capital.

The prestige and executive powers of the Wagain prime minister means that the incumbent is consistently ranked as one of the most powerful and influential people in the world. Wagain prime ministers are styled as The Right Honourable, a privilege maintained for life.


Executive Office of the Prime Minister

Chief of Staff: Juan Iturralde
Deputy Chief of Staff: Whitney Garansuay
First Lady's Chief of Staff: Munira Bassi
Senior Advisors: Herman Chiba
Esaú Hochschild
Apolline Ortiz
Communications Director: Arístides Seco
Policy Director: Kendrick Ferrer
Parliamentary Secretary: Houzan Mukriyani
Press Secretary: Manases Basalova
Social Secretary: Nilton Bautista
National High Security Advisor: Sara Sofia Pariscad
Chairman, Central Military Command: Admiral Roméo Daillencourt

Fradique Barrachina of the Wagain Labour Party (PWT) has been Prime Minister since 1 December 2018, after the left-leaning Gran Alianza Liberal (GAL) secured a parliamentary majority in that year's general election.

Barrachina was first elected to Parliament in 2009, representing the district of Babilônia-Camerino (The vibrant southern neighborhoods of Santa Catalina) for the Wagain Labour Party. Between 2015 and 2018, he served as the Minister of Culture, achieving national notoriety for his oratorical skills and charismatic brand of politics, though his career began many years before.

Born in Vitoria, Brazil, in 1960, Barrachina was a gifted student and graduated from the University of Espirito Santo with honors. After working briefly as a community activist and photographer within his native Vitoria, he moved to the national capital to take up a job with the prestigious Santa Catalina Tribune. His career with the Tribune began in 1984, when he worked on the metropolitan desk, but his talent and ambition set him on a fast track for promotion. Barrachina's hallmark soon became insightful commentary on international affairs, and he was moved between the London and Rome bureaus for most of the 1980s. He first became a national figure during the 90s, when he became the bureau chief of the Tribune's Hong Kong office and a renowned observer of East Asian affairs. From this post, he won his first of two Bithorn Prizes (the Wagain equivalent of a Pulitzer Prize) while reporting on the conflict of the 2nd Orson Civil War. Barrachina's introduction to Santa Catalina politics first came in 1997, when the paper moved him back to the capital city to be their Chief Prime Ministerial Correspondent. Like White House Correspondents in the US, Barrachina was attached to the PM's office and rubbed shoulders daily with the most powerful statesmen in the country. After landing a second Bithorn Prize for domestic political commentary, Barrachina was finally promoted to the Head International Affairs Correspondent for the Tribune, only a stone's throw from the editor's desk. The connections he made within Santa Catalina's high society would prove crucial, as he soon retired from the paper to run for mayor. In a hotly contested election, Barrachina mobilized the youth and minority votes and was elected to a four-year term in 2005. Since then, his honesty and ability to compromise has garnered him respect among allies and opponents alike.

List of Wagain Prime Ministers

Since the formation of Wagondia, 48 individuals representing six political parties have served as prime minister (three of them in non-consecutive terms). The first prime minister was Antonio José de Sucre, taking office on 15 July 1826 following the Congress of Panama. The longest-serving prime minister was Getúlio Vargas, who held the office for over eleven years, and the shortest-serving was Ramón Castilla, who occupied it for thirteen months.

Most political historians of Wagondia agree that there have been six distinct periods which have defined the office from the formation of Wagondia to the present day.

Federal Period (1826-1840)

The fifteen years immediately after the 1826 Congress of Panama are commonly grouped together into what is known as the 'Federal Period'. Wagain politics in this period were still dominated by the personality of Simón Bolívar, who had been crowned the first Emperor of Wagondia. Though nominally apolitical, the throne still carried enormous prestige, with Bolívar in particular using his influence to advance the project of Latin American unification.

Political discourse in the Federal Period revolved around the issue of federalism, from which the era borrows its name. Supporters of Bolívar formed the Unitarian Party, which maintained that a strong central government and powerful monarch were the only ways to protect the integrity of the Wagain state. The Federalist Party supported the devolution of power to the provinces and municipalities, as well as deference toward Parliament and the constitution. While the parties debated a range of other political issues, such as trade, education, foreign affairs, and the role of the church, none inspired their passions more than the issue of federalism. Both factions considered themselves heirs of the European Enlightenment, differing only in how they felt its teachings should be applied to Wagondia.

Portrait

Name

Took Office

Left Office

Duration of Term

Party

Province

Ministry

Antonio José de Sucre
(1795-1855)

15 July
1826

1 December
1830

4 years, 140 days

Unitarian

Venezuela

Sucre

José Faustino Sánchez Carrión
(1787-1832)

1 December
1830

12 June
1832

1 year, 194 days

Federalist

Peru

Carrión

Francisco de Paula Santander
(1792-1856)

12 June
1832

3 December
1834

2 years, 174 days

Federalist

Colombia

Santander

Pedro Gual Escandón
(1783-1862)

3 December
1834

25 April
1836

1 year, 144 days

Unitarian

Venezuela

Gual

Francisco Morazán
(1792-1862)

25 April
1836

9 January
1838

1 year, 259 days

Federalist

Honduras

Morazán

Vicente Rocafuerte
(1783-1857)

9 January
1838

5 September
1840

2 years, 240 days

Federalist

Ecuador

Rocafuerte

The Early Party Era (1840-1861)

As Wagondia's parliamentary democracy matured, and Western political thought became more refined, two new parties came to reflect the evolving discourse. The impetus which formalized this shift was the rise to power of Andrés de Santa Cruz, a liberal whose strongman tendencies put him at odds with the Federalist establishment. Those who supported Santa Cruz joined to form the Liberal Party, which would rapidly replace the loose federalista architecture as the party of reform. Elements opposed to Santa Cruz, including much of the former Unitarian movement, came together to establish the Partido Blanco, which remains the principal voice of conservatism in Wagondia.

The doctrine of both parties expanded to incorporate newly-enfranchised sections of the public and address emerging challenges to the young empire. The liberals embraced certain aspects of the central government, especially regulation of the church, protective tariffs, and state support for education. They tended to oppose press regulation, class stratification, and the death penalty. Liberals looked to the United States, with its egalitarian society and separation of church of state, as a model government.

Conservative Blancos followed the doctrine of Manchester Liberalism, which held that low barriers to trade and laissez-faire capitalism would lead to civilizational progress. Their political base was drawn from the ranks of merchants, Catholics, and the traditional landed aristocracy. Conservatives looked to Europe, with its monarchic heritage and social hierarchies, for inspiration. Both parties came to accept the abolition of slavery, which had been decreed by the 1826 constitution, though they differed in the degree to which they felt former slaves should be integrated into society.

Portrait

Name

Took Office

Left Office

Duration of Term

Party

Province

Ministry

Andrés de Santa Cruz
(1792-1865)

5 September
1840

12 August
1844

3 years, 342 days

Liberal

Bolivia

Santa Cruz

Carlos Soublette
(1789-1870)

12 August
1844

5 June
1846

1 year, 297 days

Blanco

Venezuela

Soublette

Ramón Castilla y Marquesado
(1797-1867)

5 June
1846

29 June
1847

1 year, 24 days

Liberal

Peru

Castilla

Juan Pablo Duarte
(1813-1876)

29 June
1847

29 June
1851

4 years, 112 days

Liberal

Dominican
Hispaniola

Duarte

Fermín Toro y Blanco
(1806-1875)

29 June
1851

2 July
1855

3 years, 258 days

Blanco

Venezuela

Toro

Justo Arosemena Quesada
(1817-1896)

2 July
1855

28 November
1859

4 years, 150 days

Liberal

Panama

Arosemena

Mariano Ospina Rodríguez
(1805-1885)

28 November
1859

11 March
1861

3 years, 104 days

Blanco

Colombia

Ospina

The Hegemonía Ecuatoriana (1861-1901)

The second half of the 19th century was a time of tremendous social and political change for Wagondia, characterized especially by rapid industrialization, growing conflict with Spain and France, mass overseas immigration, and the rise of Pan-Americanism as a coherent ideology. On account of its territorial expansion and increasing national wealth, Wagondia was gradually understood to be a global power, and the only counterweight to the United States in the Western Hemisphere.

Both the Liberals and Blancos rose to the challenge of continental leadership, proposing indigenous alternatives to European political thought and enacting their vision through a more assertive foreign policy. Conservatives greatly advanced the establishment of an overseas empire, and presided over the modernization of Wagondia's military apparatus. Inspired by political reforms in Europe, liberals oversaw the formation of an early welfare state. Both worked to finally realize Bolívar's dream of a united Latin America organized under Wagain guardianship.

This period in Wagondia is often referred to as the Hegemonía Ecuatoriana (Ecuadorian Hegemony), in tribute to the three great Ecuadorian statesmen who together led Wagondia's government for over 27 years — Santiago de Veintemilla, Gabriel García Moreno, and Eloy Alfaro.

Portrait

Name

Took Office

Left Office

Duration of Term

Party

Province

Ministry

Santiago de Veintemilla
(1804-1873)

11 March
1861

2 September
1869

8 years, 177 days

Blanco

Ecuador

Veintemilla

Gabriel García Moreno
(1821-1898)

2 September
1869

18 November
1875

6 years, 79 days

Blanco

Ecuador

Moreno I

Justo Rufino Barrios
(1835-1905)

18 November
1875

14 February
1878

2 years, 90 days

Liberal

Guatemala

Barrios

Gabriel García Moreno
(1821-1898)

14 February
1878

16 April
1881

3 years, 63 days

Blanco

Ecuador

Moreno II

Nicolás de Piérola

(1839-1913)

16 April
1881

17 July
1883

2 years, 93 days

Liberal

Peru

Piérola

Julio Argentino Roca
(1843-1914)

17 July
1883

15 December
1886

3 years, 153 days

Blanco

Argentina

Roca

Rafael Núñez Moledo
(1825-1894)

15 December
1886

4 March
1888

2 years, 152 days

Blanco

Colombia

Núñez

Eloy Alfaro
(1842-1912)

4 March
1888

16 October
1891

3 years, 226 days

Liberal

Ecuador

Alfaro I

Jorge Montt
(1845-1922)

16 October
1891

2 September
1895

3 years, 322 days

Blanco

Chile

Montt

Eloy Alfaro
(1842-1912)

2 September
1895

24 July
1901

5 years, 326 days

Liberal

Ecuador

Alfaro II

The Época Albertina (1901-1930)

The first three decades of the 20th century grew directly from the political and economic innovations of the Hegemonía. These years are often lumped into the broader Época Albertina (Albertine era), as they roughly align with the ascendancy of the enlightened Emperor Alberto I (r. 1895-1924).

The opportunities presented by industrial capital, urbanization, and the growth of empire were mirrored by the rise of distinct social conflicts and sharpened economic inequality. A half-century of societal change had elevated new voices within Wagondia's political discourse, including previously excluded groups such as socialists, the urban working classes, and women. The emergence of the Labour Party, which advocated robust state intervention in social issues, broke the traditional Liberal-Blanco duopoly and gave rise to an era of vigorous three-party competition. A string of progressive governments sought to apply scientific solutions to everything from medicine and sanitation to economics and finance, reflecting a general faith in reason and the 'perfectibility' of society through targeted reform.

This was also a time of cultural transformation, as new standards of leisure, including popular music and organized sport, gripped a younger, more socially mobile generation of Wagains. Fueled by a growing cohort of middle-class entrepreneurs and the nouveau riche, Wagondia led the world in its rate of economic growth, and became a principal exponent of trade and international credit.

Portrait

Name

Took Office

Left Office

Duration of Term

Party

Province

Ministry

Jorge Tornquist Felling
(1849-1937)

24 July
1901

7 September
1904

3 years, 46 days

Blanco

Argentina

Tornquist I

José Batlle y Ordóñez
(1856-1929)

7 September
1904

14 May
1911

6 years, 250 days

Liberal

Uruguay

Batlle

Jorge Tornquist Felling
(1849-1937)

14 May
1911

28 August
1914

3 years, 107 days

Blanco

Argentina

Tornquist II

Guillermo Billinghurst
(1851-1924)

28 August
1914

30 November
1916

2 years, 95 days

Liberal

Peru

Billinghurst

Hipólito Yrigoyen
(1852-1933)

30 November
1916

11 June
1922

5 years, 194 days

Labour

Peru

Yrigoyen

Augusto Leguía
(1863-1932)

11 June
1922

27 August
1927

5 years, 78 days

Blanco

Peru

Leguía

Cleto González Víquez
(1858-1937)

27 August
1927

31 March
1930

2 years, 217 days

Liberal

Costa Rica

González

The Populist Era (1930-1983)

The visible prosperity of the Época Albertina came to an abrupt halt with the global economic depression of the 1930s. The patterns of consumerism and overseas trade which had fueled the previous decade's economic expansion now fell to menacing lows, while unemployment climbed. The Labour Party, which successfully mobilized a coalition of disaffected liberals, labor unions, and the rural poor, came to power in 1930 with a record majority, cementing their claim as the main opposition party to the conservative Blancos. Vargas — who remains the longest-serving prime minister in Wagain history — centralized the government, invested heavily in domestic industry, took Wagondia off the gold standard, extended a state monopoly over strategic resources, and pursued aggressive social reform. The precedent set by Vargas helped to establish a postwar consensus between Labour and the Blancos, whereby both parties generally committed themselves to economic nationalism, trade unionism, and the welfare state.

With some variation, each Prime Minister for the next half-century articulated their agenda through the rhetoric of populism. The government invested substantially in public works, especially in the sparsely-populated interior, and worked to implement a national health service. This was a time of relative egalitarianism — employment and productivity reached historic heights, and traditional positions on abortion, homosexuality, and women's rights began to be questioned. In 1956, Eva Perón of the Partido Blanco became the world's first female head of government.

Against the backdrop of the Cold War, Wagondia's foreign policy oscillated between conciliatory non-alignment and NATO surrogacy, though it remained decidedly anti-communist throughout. The triumph of the socialist Aprista movement in the 1971 general elections represented a high-water mark for Wagain liberalism, when the postwar consensus was strongest.

Portrait

Name

Took Office

Left Office

Duration of Term

Party

Province

Ministry

Getúlio Vargas
(1882-1954)

31 March
1930

19 June
1941

11 years, 83 days

Labour

Brazil

Vargas

Manuel Luis Quezon
(1878-1945)

19 June
1941

21 December
1945

4 years, 186 days

Blanco

Philippines

Quezon

Miguel Alemán Valdés
(1900-1983)

21 December
1945

7 September
1947

1 year, 260 days

Blanco

Mexico

Alemán

Jorge Eliécer Gaitán
(1903-1988)

7 September
1947

25 June
1949

1 year, 292 days

Labour

Colombia

Gaitán

Juan Domingo Perón
(1895-1974)

25 June
1949

1 July
1954

5 years, 7 days

Blanco

Argentina

Perón I

Alberto Lleras Camargo
(1906-1990)

1 July
1954

24 February
1956

1 year, 238 days

Labour

Colombia

Camargo

Eva Duarte de Perón
(1919-1993)

24 February
1956

5 December
1959

3 years, 285 days

Blanco

Argentina

Perón II

Juscelino Kubitschek
(1902-1976)

5 December
1959

12 August
1963

3 years, 251 days

Labour

Brazil

Kubitschek

Rómulo Betancourt
(1908-1981)

12 August
1963

8 September
1968

5 years, 24 days

Labour

Venezuela

Betancourt

Eduardo Frei Montalva
(1911-1982)

8 September
1968

14 May
1971

2 years, 248 days

Blanco

Chile

Frei

Víctor Raúl Haya de la Torre
(1895-1979)

14 May
1971

13 July
1976

5 years, 62 days

Aprista

Peru

Haya

Salvador Allende
(1908-1990)

13 July
1976

20 October
1978

2 years, 99 days

Aprista

Chile

Allende

Norman Bustamante
(1924-1997)

20 October
1978

24 August
1983

4 years, 309 days

Blanco

Jamaica

Bustamante

The Libertarian Era (1983-present)

Though the postwar era had produced greater social mobility and a higher quality of life for many Wagains, concerns grew over the nation's mounting debt burden and continued reliance on punitive tax rates. Mirroring the electoral success of Margaret Thatcher in Britain and Ronald Reagan in the United States, a new generation of Wagain conservatives came to power with an aim to dismantle the populist consensus. Beginning with the de Lasala ministry in 1983, a succession of Blanco governments pulled away from their party's paternalistic orthodoxy, and began to articulate spending austerity, deregulation, and privatization of state-run industry.

As the national political climate shifted in favor of economic liberalization, both parties came to embrace elements of neoliberalism, especially regarding free trade. Economic growth hastened, and consumerism reached new heights. Wagain culture developed as a global brand, and cities like Santa Catalina and São Paulo evolved into highly-developed centers of the world economy. Critics, most prominently Prime Minister Elie Mousawi, charged that growth had been uneven, and done little to reduce poverty or curb income inequality. The 2008 Financial Crisis caused many, especially among the youngest generations, to re-evaluate the legacy of Neoliberalism.

Wagondia also became more internationally minded during this period. While governments in the Populist Era had sought to maintain neutrality in foreign affairs (epitomized by the decision not to pursue a nuclear arsenal), the end of the Cold War and the nation's soaring economic prosperity afforded new opportunities for engagement. Organizations like the G3 were established to promote closer alignment with other liberal democracies, especially after Wagondia's inclusion in the Osperita Zone. An otherwise prosperous period in the nation's history has been marred by mounting tensions with the Orsonian Empire, culminating in the Goa Siege of 1995. The subsequent breakdown in diplomatic relations, coupled with mounting instability in Santa Lucija, has tested the resolve of Wagondia's leadership, and imperiled several allied nations. The rise of Fradique Barrachina as leader of the traditionally pacifist Labour Party indicates a new willingness to assertively defend the principles of liberty and sovereignty upon which Wagain identity is based.

Portrait

Name

Took Office

Left Office

Duration of Term

Party

Province

Ministry

Ambrosio de Lasala
(1928-2011)

24 August
1983

9 December
1986

3 years, 109 days

Blanco

Mexico

De Lasala

Corazon Aquino
(1933-2009)

9 December
1986

27 March
1990

3 years, 110 days

Labour

Philippines

Aquino

Fernando Torii
(1924-)

27 March
1990

1 December
1995

5 years, 251 days

Blanco

Peru

Torii

Cipriano Jardim
(1931-)

1 December
1995

13 May
2002

6 years, 166 days

Blanco

Brazil

Jardim

Elie Mousawi
(1947-)

13 May
2002

3 August
2010

8 years, 85 days

Labour

Venezuela

Mousawi

Maurício Corvalán
(1959-)

3 August
2010

6 January
2015

4 years, 158 days

Blanco

Argentina

Corvalán

Alejandro Cotilla
(1962-)

6 January
2015

1 December
2018

3 years, 331 days

Blanco

Panama

Cotilla

Fradique Barrachina
(1960-)

1 December
2018

-

Incumbent

Labour

Distrito Federal

Barrachina

Report