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WA Delegate (non-executive): The Republic of The Akasha Colony (elected )

Founder: The United States of Seismic doings

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Comrades, we have done it! We have vanquished the zombie hordes not once, but twice!

Congratulations are in order, my brothers, for we have vanquished the undead menace in only 6 hours and 44 minutes! Huzzah!

Embassies: Intergalactic Federacy, Aels, Necron Empire, and Alterran Federation.

Tags: FT: FTL, FT: FTLi, Role Player, Medium, and Post-Modern Tech.

Regional Power: Moderate

Facebook nations contains 27 nations, the 413th most in the world.

Today's World Census Report

The Largest Agricultural Sector in facebook nations

As a region, facebook nations is ranked 158th in the world for Largest Agricultural Sector.

#NationWA CategoryMotto
1.The Colony of IshCongBenevolent Dictatorship“But it was *a* beginning...”
2.The United Communist Regions of The Azerothian UnionCorrupt Dictatorship“For Chairman and Union!”
3.The Colony of Redemption-AmericaInoffensive Centrist Democracy“E Pluribus Unum”
4.The Imperial Dominion of AmigosaCorporate Police State“Bow down”
5.The Nomadic Peoples of Agua del FeugoInoffensive Centrist Democracy“Non nobis solum”
6.The Republic of The Akasha ColonyWA MemberLeft-wing Utopia“True Freedom for All Men”
7.The Psychic Type's territory of SquareDisc CityLeft-Leaning College State“Prediction is better than cure.”
8.The Housemates of Great Houses of XieWA MemberLiberal Democratic Socialists“The art of war is of vital importance to the state”
9.The Republic of United States 0f AmericaWA MemberLeft-wing Utopia“United We Stand, Divided We Fall ”
10.The Kingdom of New FrankiaFather Knows Best State“We live”
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The Colony of IshCong wrote:You forgot the best part! He's leading the polls for the GOP nomination by like, 5 points!
TRUMP 2016!
MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN!
MEXICANS ARE RAPISTS!
WORK MORE HOURS!
VETERANS AREN'T HEROES!
TRUMP! TRUMP! TRUMP!
WHOOOOOOO!~


It would almost be comical if he wasn't leading in the polls. I've been living in the United States for 10 years now and still don't understand the mind set of people here.

The Second Brotherhood of Planets and New Frankia

On the bright side of the upcoming election: Bernie Sanders is quickly making up ground on Hillary Clinton! He's no longer the "Long-shot" option!

Greater Caprica

The Technocratic People's Union of Estruia wrote:On the bright side of the upcoming election: Bernie Sanders is quickly making up ground on Hillary Clinton! He's no longer the "Long-shot" option!


It doesn't help that the media (even NPR) still treats him like a joke. At least on the radio.

The Technocratic People's Union of Estruia wrote:On the bright side of the upcoming election: Bernie Sanders is quickly making up ground on Hillary Clinton! He's no longer the "Long-shot" option!


He still is the long-shot; he's peaking rather early with a lot of campaigning still to go, and has had a lot of trouble appealing to anyone outside of the white progressive demographic. Which is to say, every ethnic minority group. We're still a year (to the day) away from the Democratic national convention.

Strange as it may seem, the 2012 Republican field is an interesting example, with plenty of candidates peaking early, but none managing to unseat Mitt Romney despite widespread discontent about his relatively weak candidacy. It will be hard for Sanders to make up his deficits among minorities and women by the time of the 2016 convention, given that the former were a firm part of Bill Clinton's campaign and Hillary has rather obvious advantages in appealing to the latter.

The Second Brotherhood of Planets, Greater Caprica, and New Frankia

The Republic of The Akasha Colony wrote:He still is the long-shot; he's peaking rather early with a lot of campaigning still to go, and has had a lot of trouble appealing to anyone outside of the white progressive demographic. Which is to say, every ethnic minority group. We're still a year (to the day) away from the Democratic national convention.

Strange as it may seem, the 2012 Republican field is an interesting example, with plenty of candidates peaking early, but none managing to unseat Mitt Romney despite widespread discontent about his relatively weak candidacy. It will be hard for Sanders to make up his deficits among minorities and women by the time of the 2016 convention, given that the former were a firm part of Bill Clinton's campaign and Hillary has rather obvious advantages in appealing to the latter.


How can you say that Sanders is peaking? His popularity is growing and shows no signs of plateauing off. Like you said, we're a year out from the election, so that leaves plenty of time for him to gain support among ethnic minorities. To be quite honest, it sounds like you are attempting to discredit, or diminish his campaign.

The Technocratic People's Union of Estruia wrote:How can you say that Sanders is peaking? His popularity is growing and shows no signs of plateauing off. Like you said, we're a year out from the election, so that leaves plenty of time for him to gain support among ethnic minorities. To be quite honest, it sounds like you are attempting to discredit, or diminish his campaign.


And that's the exact problem.

Anyone who says Sanders isn't going to win gets labeled as "trying to diminish him" or "attempting to discredit him." It's a reality-distortion field up there with the likes of Fox News. But it's the truth.

Sanders has a lot of problems from an electoral perspective. He's an old white man running to win the nomination of a party that is not particularly old and increasingly not white. Most of his biggest issues are not ones that trend among minorities (especially blacks and Latinos), who are often socially conservative but vote Democrat because Republicans have alienated them with specific stances on police brutality, race relations, criminal justice reform, and immigration. His support is growing among young white male progressives, but is not going anywhere among minorities, where Hillary Clinton holds a commanding advantage.

And there isn't much Sanders can really do about it. Given that he started from zero, he had nowhere to go but up, and given that Hillary started with practically everything, the only thing she could do was lose some support. But the demographics are telling. Despite all of the scandals she's weathered, and the often-times lukewarm reception she's received as the presumed nominee basically since 2008, she's come out ahead even among the young white male progressive crowd.

It might be tempting to compare Sanders to Obama's "surprise" win in 2008, but Obama had a few key strengths that Sanders does not. The biggest being simply that he was black, and that alone secured him over 90% of the black vote in the primaries. Which was key to his electoral wins in the South, where black voters make up a very large percentage of the population. In fact, blacks turned out for Obama in huge numbers despite other demograhics with similar political leanings siding with Clinton. The 2008 primaries were surprisingly close, and in fact Clinton won the popular vote, but Obama stole the South and Midwest, edging Clinton out in delegates. Other factors include his youth, which played a central role in his campaign messaging and helped portray him as a new generation of politician, young and with the times.

Sanders, unfortunately, has none of these. He polls poorly among minorities who have no idea who he is. He's even older than Clinton, and has to deal with a rather divided base even among his core constituencies. To mainstream Democratic voters and independents, he's too progressive and combative. To hardcore socialists, he's not socialist enough, or to likely to compromise, as the liberal Obama ended up doing in his eight years in office. Clinton's message can be very simple: if you don't want a whackjob like Donald Trump, or some bomb-Iran hawk, or a cut-all-welfare libertarian in office, vote for me. That's a rather compelling message to a large part of the American voting public.

Sanders has the uphill task of convincing voters why they should vote for him instead of the default "good enough" Clinton. He already grabbed the young white male progressive crowd that was dissatisfied with Clinton. The liberal equivalent of Ron Paul's young white male libertarian demographics. His strengths in Iowa and New Hampshire are a result of this, as both state electorates are overwhelmingly white. But the trouble is grabbing the rest of the electorate that wasn't already primed for his candidacy, and in that regard, he doesn't really have much to offer. He's put in rather lukewarm mentions of prison reform and such, but combined with low name recognition, he hasn't gotten anywhere. South Carolina is going to be a rather hard sell, given that nearly half the electorate is black.

Political campaigns are an endurance race, not a sprint. At least, not until the last few weeks leading up to the general election. Clinton's playing the long game and is demonstrating her experience by not sweating the small things like Sanders or O'Malley right now, but focusing on the things she needs for the general election. Which is to say, a broad and diverse network of operatives, the broad support of the establishment, and most of all, money. Wasting time and money on the primary she is most likely to win would be just that: a waste. It's Sanders who needs to keep pushing, but he runs the danger of tiring out his brand name or turning off whole swathes of the independent electorate in his rush to win the nomination. Just as the Republicans have been running the risk of losing independents in general election as they chase the far-right primary voters.

The Second Brotherhood of Planets and New Frankia

The Republic of The Akasha Colony wrote:Sanders, unfortunately, has none of these. He polls poorly among minorities who have no idea who he is. He's even older than Clinton, and has to deal with a rather divided base even among his core constituencies. To mainstream Democratic voters and independents, he's too progressive and combative. To hardcore socialists, he's not socialist enough, or to likely to compromise, as the liberal Obama ended up doing in his eight years in office. Clinton's message can be very simple: if you don't want a whackjob like Donald Trump, or some bomb-Iran hawk, or a cut-all-welfare libertarian in office, vote for me. That's a rather compelling message to a large part of the American voting public.

Sanders has the uphill task of convincing voters why they should vote for him instead of the default "good enough" Clinton. He already grabbed the young white male progressive crowd that was dissatisfied with Clinton. The liberal equivalent of Ron Paul's young white male libertarian demographics. His strengths in Iowa and New Hampshire are a result of this, as both state electorates are overwhelmingly white. But the trouble is grabbing the rest of the electorate that wasn't already primed for his candidacy, and in that regard, he doesn't really have much to offer. He's put in rather lukewarm mentions of prison reform and such, but combined with low name recognition, he hasn't gotten anywhere. South Carolina is going to be a rather hard sell, given that nearly half the electorate is black.

Political campaigns are an endurance race, not a sprint. At least, not until the last few weeks leading up to the general election. Clinton's playing the long game and is demonstrating her experience by not sweating the small things like Sanders or O'Malley right now, but focusing on the things she needs for the general election. Which is to say, a broad and diverse network of operatives, the broad support of the establishment, and most of all, money. Wasting time and money on the primary she is most likely to win would be just that: a waste. It's Sanders who needs to keep pushing, but he runs the danger of tiring out his brand name or turning off whole swathes of the independent electorate in his rush to win the nomination. Just as the Republicans have been running the risk of losing independents in general election as they chase the far-right primary voters.


I've heard the bolded portion very often among those who take pride in presenting far-left politics.

However I do feel like we need some way to help people become more informed about him. It seems that Akasha Colony's analysis might reflect why several allegedly liberal or 'left-leaning' sources just ignore him.

Post self-deleted by Greater Caprica.

Post self-deleted by Greater Caprica.

Being self-identified as an independent Democratic Socialist since 2009, when I first started hearing about Sanders early in the spring I was overjoyed. Many of my friends love Sanders and we talk about him a lot, even my libertarian friends like him over Hillary cause he's less big business and "anti-establishment" -esque (just look at his campaign contributions and compare them to Hillary). To clarify I love Bernie a lot more then Hillary and genuinely want him to win the presidency in 2016 however reality makes that point a real far-stretched chance.

Every week we see new articles and discussions about Bernie Sanders gaining or doubling in appeal when reality its really just visibility to Americans. What most don't realize is Sanders is still struggling to appeal to the broader base just like Ching said. And on top of that, many of these articles and discussions are biased cause when you look at them, yes, his appeal has doubled but so has the people who don't like him. Recently his favorability has increased from 12% to 24% but discontent with him has grown from 8% to 20%. And even when you do compare it to Obamas surprise nomination over Hillary, Obama had much higher favorability ratings (almost double where Sanders is now) when it was at this point in the race.

I still continue to share and have discussions with family and friends about Bernie Sanders to spread the word about him cause I'm a huge fan of him, especially on facebook. But realistically Clinton is so well organized and in the public eye she has so much more support.

Even then though, I think Bernie is setting himself up for not just the Presidency but a political trend that will continue to grow and strengthen after the 2016 election to get more people to notice how much the government actually does effect them and raise public awareness about social and economic policy reforms. I strongly believe his messages hes saying now will continue to resonate and get more people in-touch with changing the system and realizing a lot more that they can make a difference.

Amigosa, Estruia, The Second Brotherhood of Planets, and New Frankia

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