Pony Lands RMB

WA Delegate (non-executive): The Pony Principality of Princess Luna (elected 344 days ago)

Founder: The Pony Principality of Magical Equestria

World Factbook Entry

We've got ponies, therefore your argument is invalid.

Welcome to NationStates' original My Little Pony-themed region. Anyone wishing to RP a nation based on any part of the MLP franchise is welcome to set up shop here.

Our Regional Maps: LinkPony Lands LinkNorthern Pony Lands

PONY-THEMED NS FORUM THREADS

Pony Lands Map Discussion
CoPS RP Group
The Shift: An Update on the State of Holy Marsh (Reactions)
Glory to the God Princess: The Celestial War (Closed)
The Celestial Negotiations (Pony Lands: See OOC)
The Celestial Negotiations OOC Thread

Embassies: Equestria, New Lunar Republic, Orbital Friendship Cannon HQ, Tareldanore, Dash Clan, The Commonwealth Of Furry Peoples, Angels of Derp, Trojans, Mystria, Avalanchia, The Empire of Friendship, Vissella, Caballete Equus, Alaran peri quan preciad, Unified Skaian Syndicate of Rulers, The Epic Pony Region, and 30 others.Eladen, Sacrum Romanum Imperium, Farkistan, The Mictlan System, Strategos Prime, Glorious Nations of Iwaku, The Federal Islands 2nd Gen, NationStates Sesquipedalian Countries, League of Christian Nations, Armagedox, Freedom and Justice Alliance, The Darwin Allied Republics, The Discord Dominion, The Derpy Dominion, Yerushalem VI, Louisiana Alliance x Alliance Louisiane, Tuatha De Danann, One big Island, Ivory Tower, New Industria, Interstellar Union, The Military Commonwealth, The Illuminati, The Sparkle Confederation, Brannack, Pirate warriors, Eientei, the Realm of Discord, My Little Pony Equestria, and The Everfree Forest.

The embassy with League of Christian Nations is being withdrawn. Closure expected in 2 days 23 hours.

Tags: Enormous, Featured, Fantasy Tech, Multi-Species, Magical, and Monarchist.

Regional Power: High

Pony Lands contains 176 nations, the 55th most in the world.

ActivityHistoryAdministration

Today's World Census Report

The Largest Soda Pop Sector in Pony Lands

As a region, Pony Lands is ranked 16,957th in the world for Largest Soda Pop Sector.

#NationWA CategoryMotto
131.The Insomniac Republic of PargentinaDemocratic Socialists“Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus”
132.The Federation of Novian StatesDemocratic Socialists“War or peace, we will be strong!”
133.The United Kingdom of The United Kingdom of WubInoffensive Centrist Democracy“In Vinyl Scratch we trust”
134.The Kingdom of Equestrian MexicoWA MemberFather Knows Best State“Long live Equestria!”
135.The Theocracy of GalestormCivil Rights Lovefest“Let faith be the wind beneath your wings”
136.The Republic of EmersesCorrupt Dictatorship“Protected by all, Defended from many”
137.The Northern Equestrian Empire of Crystal PoniesDemocratic Socialists“Save the Crystal Ponies with History!”
138.The Extremely Holy Theocracy of Extreme Religious FanaticsPsychotic Dictatorship“Religious to an Absurd Degree”
139.The Rogue Nation of Rampaging Teddy BearsDemocratic Socialists“Hear and Fear Our Adorable Roar!”
140.The Pegasus Pony of Daring DoDemocratic Socialists“Don't Back Down”
Page:  «  1  2  . . . 11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  »

Regional Happenings

More...

Pony Lands Regional Message Board

The Queendom of Luminous Chromia wrote:Really? I assumed all colors visible by the eye would be included in the spectrum...after all, it is the visisble spectrum, it stands to reason if one can see it, it is part of it. I suppose human silliness with terminology got in the way.

That's not quite how it works. There's no such thing as a "white" photon, instead, "white" light is a mixture of multiple types of photons. Similarly, black is simply the lack of any visible photons, not a specific wavelength of light. (Worse, "white" isn't even a specific combination of all wavelengths - an incandescent light bulb produces proportionally much more red and less blue light than the sun, but our eyes naturally adjust to seeing either mixture as "white".)

Human "color", however, isn't the same as light wavelengths. As noted above, we can see colors that are actually combinations of wavelengths. Conversely, while true light forms a continuous spectrum, the human eye can only detect three broad classes of photon, roughly corresponding to "red", "green", and "blue". Yellow, for example, can either mean a single type of photon with a yellow wavelength, or a mixture of two types of photon where one has a red wavelength and one has a green wavelength - the human eye isn't capable of telling the difference, though the eyes of another species might. (Humans can see three "channels" of color. Most mammals, and colorblind humans, can only see two. Most birds can see four, with some even seeing five. The record is held by mantius shrimp, at twelve, plus the ability to detect light polarization. And just that you can see the same number of channels doesn't mean they're the same ones, such as with bees and some other insects seeing green, blue, and ultraviolet, but not red.)

So, there are wavelengths that don't map to unique colors (even within the visible spectrum), and colors that don't map to single wavelengths.

So color as we perceive it is a three-dimensional value, and we can do a coordinate transformation. One system that programmers came up with that decently matches subjective perception of color is "hue, saturation, value". Value is simply how light a color is, and is physically represented as "more of the same" - the same types of photon, but more of them. For example, brown is simply a darker orange. Zero value means black, or no photons at all. (Yes, "value" is a stupid name, but that's what they came up with.) Saturation is how "washed-out" a color is. A low saturation means that an otherwise-vivid color is mixed with some amount of white (or gray, if dark enough), creating a pale or grayish color with only a slight tinge toward a particular hue. For example, pink is pale red (this is not the same as light red, which is simply more red, not red washed out with white). Zero saturations means white, gray, or black. Hue, finally, describes which wavelength(s) you peak at (by a small or great amount, depending on saturation). Hue, finally, is what's left - the "main character" of a color, disregarding the "boring" dimensions of "more of the same" and "blurred out by uniform noise".

Now, as it turns out, most hues can be represented by a particular wavelength of light (even though that's not how they're produced by your computer monitor). Again, the eye sees yellow as "sort of red and sort of green", which can be produced either by two types of photons, or by one that's just in the middle. But here's the problem - the spectrum is linear, not circular. So the color that mixes the two ends of the spectrum, namely sort of red and sort of blue/violet, cannot[ be represented by a single wavelength of light. It always has to be a combination of two wavelengths. As such, a true rainbow doesn't include it.

Note that if humans could see in four channels rather than three, there'd be a lot more hues that aren't part of the spectrum. If we could see red, green, blue, and ultraviolet, then red+green (yellow), green+blue (cyan), and blue+ulraviolet (...violet?) would all be okay, since they're mixing two subsequent wavelengths, but red+blue (purple), red+ultraviolet, and green+ultraviolet would not, and then there's stuff like red+green+ultraviolet/yellow+ultraviolet to start on... As a corollary, birds might find the rainbow less exciting. Lots of colors they're interested in that aren't part of it...

Also, I cheated a little. Humans actually have four types of photoreceptors, but the information provided by the fourth is almost completely redundant with the first three, so it doesn't add any colors - unless it's too dark for the first three to be able to see at all. This is why stars all appear white even though they can come in a variety of reds, oranges, yellows, whites, and blues. The colors are too faint to make out with the naked eye.

"Color", as we understand it, is really pretty much a mental construct. Here's a really cool optical illusion to illustrate that:
http://www.astropix.com/HTML/I_ASTROP/COLOR.HTM

The Queendom of Luminous Chromia wrote:I fixed those spots up. Thanks for the proof-read.

Caught one more:
"bioluminescent patches on the Wreaths arms" -> Wreaths'

The Queendom of Luminous Chromia wrote:Wherever light can go, so can Light Ponies. Through glass, even.

What about materials that allow only some percentage of light to pass through, or that allow photons to pass through to the other side but scatter them so that shapes can't be made out, or that let only light of particular wavelengths through (particularly if it's transparent only to non-visible wavelengths)?

Would these be difficult or painful to pass through?

What about materials that block sight but that physical creatures can easily pass through, like smoke?

Note that even water, while transparent in small quantities, blocks light a lot faster than air does. (One kilometer below the surface of the ocean is pretty much completely dark, while you can easily see through all of the air to make out individual landforms on the moon. The air gets less dense as it gets higher, but if the entire atmosphere were condensed to sea level density, it would still be about eight kilometers tall. Most of the ocean is only three to six kilometers deep.) On another note, typical window glass appears transparent to us but it actually blocks ultraviolet light.

The Queendom of Luminous Chromia wrote:If you stabbed one, I think the blade would just pass right through.

...I'm not using a transparent knife...

The Queendom of Luminous Chromia wrote:I will instead say ghost-flight like speeds,

I have no idea what ghost-flight-like speeds are, having never met a ghost.

I generally picture ghosts as actually floating pretty slow, so they can loom menacingly as they advance on you and stuff. At best, they'd be able to "walk on air" at normal walking speed, just without worrying about petty details like the ground. (Of course, normal walking, or at least running, speed for a pony can be more than for a human...)

The Queendom of Luminous Chromia wrote:I imagine they can go pretty darn fast because they would encounter 0 air resistance. Then again, going fast would take extra light magic to sustain, so it is probably to be avoided.

Huh? If they encounter no air resistance, then it shouldn't cost them anything to sustain their speeds, only to get to those speeds in the first place.

The Principality of Trotterdam wrote:That's not quite how it works. There's no such thing as a "white" photon, instead, "white" light is a mixture of multiple types of photons. Similarly, black is simply the lack of any visible photons, not a specific wavelength of light. (Worse, "white" isn't even a specific combination of all wavelengths - an incandescent light bulb produces proportionally much more red and less blue light than the sun, but our eyes naturally adjust to seeing either mixture as "white".)

Human "color", however, isn't the same as light wavelengths. As noted above, we can see colors that are actually combinations of wavelengths. Conversely, while true light forms a continuous spectrum, the human eye can only detect three broad classes of photon, roughly corresponding to "red", "green", and "blue". Yellow, for example, can either mean a single type of photon with a yellow wavelength, or a mixture of two types of photon where one has a red wavelength and one has a green wavelength - the human eye isn't capable of telling the difference, though the eyes of another species might. (Humans can see three "channels" of color. Most mammals, and colorblind humans, can only see two. Most birds can see four, with some even seeing five. The record is held by mantius shrimp, at twelve, plus the ability to detect light polarization. And just that you can see the same number of channels doesn't mean they're the same ones, such as with bees and some other insects seeing green, blue, and ultraviolet, but not red.)

So, there are wavelengths that don't map to unique colors (even within the visible spectrum), and colors that don't map to single wavelengths.

So color as we perceive it is a three-dimensional value, and we can do a coordinate transformation. One system that programmers came up with that decently matches subjective perception of color is "hue, saturation, value". Value is simply how light a color is, and is physically represented as "more of the same" - the same types of photon, but more of them. For example, brown is simply a darker orange. Zero value means black, or no photons at all. (Yes, "value" is a stupid name, but that's what they came up with.) Saturation is how "washed-out" a color is. A low saturation means that an otherwise-vivid color is mixed with some amount of white (or gray, if dark enough), creating a pale or grayish color with only a slight tinge toward a particular hue. For example, pink is pale red (this is not the same as light red, which is simply more red, not red washed out with white). Zero saturations means white, gray, or black. Hue, finally, describes which wavelength(s) you peak at (by a small or great amount, depending on saturation). Hue, finally, is what's left - the "main character" of a color, disregarding the "boring" dimensions of "more of the same" and "blurred out by uniform noise".

Now, as it turns out, most hues can be represented by a particular wavelength of light (even though that's not how they're produced by your computer monitor). Again, the eye sees yellow as "sort of red and sort of green", which can be produced either by two types of photons, or by one that's just in the middle. But here's the problem - the spectrum is linear, not circular. So the color that mixes the two ends of the spectrum, namely sort of red and sort of blue/violet, cannot[ be represented by a single wavelength of light. It always has to be a combination of two wavelengths. As such, a true rainbow doesn't include it.

Note that if humans could see in four channels rather than three, there'd be a lot more hues that aren't part of the spectrum. If we could see red, green, blue, and ultraviolet, then red+green (yellow), green+blue (cyan), and blue+ulraviolet (...violet?) would all be okay, since they're mixing two subsequent wavelengths, but red+blue (purple), red+ultraviolet, and green+ultraviolet would not, and then there's stuff like red+green+ultraviolet/yellow+ultraviolet to start on... As a corollary, birds might find the rainbow less exciting. Lots of colors they're interested in that aren't part of it...

Also, I cheated a little. Humans actually have four types of photoreceptors, but the information provided by the fourth is almost completely redundant with the first three, so it doesn't add any colors - unless it's too dark for the first three to be able to see at all. This is why stars all appear white even though they can come in a variety of reds, oranges, yellows, whites, and blues. The colors are too faint to make out with the naked eye.

"Color", as we understand it, is really pretty much a mental construct. Here's a really cool optical illusion to illustrate that:
http://www.astropix.com/HTML/I_ASTROP/COLOR.HTM

Why thank you for enlightening me.

That was a pun, :D
But seriously, thank you. Science is awesome. Color nation needs to know about science of colors, yes?

The Principality of Trotterdam wrote:Caught one more:
"bioluminescent patches on the Wreaths arms" -> Wreaths'

Got that one too.

PS. Have fun with the new factbook. I wrote the same words over so many times I shiver to think how many of those times I misspelled them.

The Principality of Trotterdam wrote:What about materials that allow only some percentage of light to pass through, or that allow photons to pass through to the other side but scatter them so that shapes can't be made out, or that let only light of particular wavelengths through (particularly if it's transparent only to non-visible wavelengths)?

Here is a good rule: if you can see starlight through it, they can pass through it.

They are pretty much made of starlight...

The Principality of Trotterdam wrote:Would these be difficult or painful to pass through?

Depends. If it is a more opaque object but still somewhat translucent, it would be like swimming through tar. The light magic that makes up the Light Pony body would have to seep through the material for the Pony to pass through it.

The Principality of Trotterdam wrote:What about materials that block sight but that physical creatures can easily pass through, like smoke?

Well, one in most cases smoke can still be shone though by light, so a Light Pony can still pass through it, moving perhaps just a little slower than normal.

And, if that's doesn't work, it can just use up some light magic to become tangible and walk through it like normal.

The Principality of Trotterdam wrote:...I'm not using a transparent knife...

Right, but the Light Pony is made of light.

You can't stab light.

The Principality of Trotterdam wrote:I have no idea what ghost-flight-like speeds are, having never met a ghost.

I generally picture ghosts as actually floating pretty slow, so they can loom menacingly as they advance on you and stuff. At best, they'd be able to "walk on air" at normal walking speed, just without worrying about petty details like the ground. (Of course, normal walking, or at least running, speed for a pony can be more than for a human...)
[...]
Huh? If they encounter no air resistance, then it shouldn't cost them anything to sustain their speeds, only to get to those speeds in the first place.

Well, this is what I meant. Accelerating to a high speed takes lots of light magic, and then slowing down again takes lots of light magic. So, it is wiser to instead take a slower flight speed, like that of a sluggish bird flight, so that going airborne, moving to the flight speed, maneuvering in the air, and slowing down to a landing all take less light magic to accomplish.

Oh, yes, and I finally got the Light Ponies factbook up.

Oh boy that one was a bother to write.

Iam totally lost on what's happening care to enlighten me

The Federal Republic of Shraka wrote:Iam totally lost on what's happening care to enlighten me

Hello.

I made factbooks. :)

Hello yes I know I read them. Was that sentence rude iam not sure. Any way are those pics of your origin becuase I don't like ponies claiming things as there when they are not. I don't want a war between rift ponies and light ponies

The Federal Republic of Shraka wrote:Hello yes I know I read them. Was that sentence rude iam not sure. Any way are those pics of your origin becuase I don't like ponies claiming things as there when they are not. I don't want a war between rift ponies and light ponies

Oh, no no, those aren't mine.

The only thing I can take credit for is the half hour each it takes me to find the right image for the job on Google images and deviantArt.

The Queendom of Luminous Chromia wrote:Oh, no no, those aren't mine.

The only thing I can take credit for is the half hour each it takes me to find the right image for the job on Google images and deviantArt.

sweet now we need to get pinkie pie to throw a party for your nation :-D

The Federal Republic of Shraka wrote:sweet now we need to get pinkie pie to throw a party for your nation :-D

That would be pretty cool. :D

The Queendom of Luminous Chromia wrote:That would be pretty cool. :D

now iam going to borrow your trees for party invites

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