New Warsaw Pact RMB

WA Delegate: The Nomadic Peoples of Damanucus (elected )

Founder: The Golden Democratic Judgeship of Nullarni

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Most Nations: 30th Most World Assembly Endorsements: 68th Greatest Rich-Poor Divides: 2,053rd
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The NEW WARSAW PACT (NWP) is a loosely affiliated region where creativity and diversity are encouraged and rewarded, and national sovereignty is valued above all else. We welcome all who wish to join, regardless of political, social, or cultural ideals and beliefs... Except Nazis. We don't like them.

WA members, please endorse our WA Delegate.

Any regions interested in diplomatic relations, please contact our Minister of Foreign Affairs. Any region desiring an embassy MUST fill out an Linkapplication PRIOR to putting in an embassy request.


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Re-founded: February 3, 2010



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    QuickStart Guide to NationStates and the NWP

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    Useful NS sites and Utilities (updated: 5/31/2015)

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Embassies: The New Warsaw Pact, Wintreath, The Allied States, The Allied Republics, Spiritus, Glass Gallows, Global Right Alliance, Antarctic Alliance, The Land of Kings and Emperors, Africa, United Empire of Islam, Valhalla, the West Pacific, Antarctic Oasis, Confederacy of Allied States, NWO, and 5 others.Starways Congress, The Second Warsaw Pact, The Confederate States of the IB Program, Warzone Africa, and The Great Conservative Alliance.

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New Warsaw Pact contains 396 nations, the 30th most in the world.

Today's World Census Report

The Most Compassionate Citizens in New Warsaw Pact

Exhaustive World Census tests involving kittens revealed the following nations to be the most compassionate.

As a region, New Warsaw Pact is ranked 8,048th in the world for Most Compassionate Citizens.

NationWA CategoryMotto
11.The United Kingdom of KholdlandsDemocratic Socialists“Knowledge Conquers All ”
12.The United Provinces of VunayrDemocratic Socialists“Aequalitas Ius Datum.”
13.The Federal Republic of XiphosLiberal Democratic Socialists“Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum”
14.The Free republic of Within the forestLiberal Democratic Socialists“Within the forest anything's possible”
15.The Largonian Republic of LeetoniaLiberal Democratic Socialists“Never Moon a Werewolf”
16.The Republic of TheodosiyaInoffensive Centrist Democracy“Unity in Diversity”
17.The Santai Republic of FrasulyDemocratic Socialists“Nothing but us”
18.The People's Socialist Republics of SordicaInoffensive Centrist Democracy“Sing to our Motherland!”
19.The Gran State of QuensatangoFather Knows Best State“Patrea, Carono, e Deos”
20.The Rogue Nation of BarastaviaLiberal Democratic Socialists“By Blood and By Toil, We Claim this Soil”
«12345. . .3940»

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New Warsaw Pact Regional Message Board

The Kapokanas of Wonderchicken wrote:There is nothing wrong with the word "although," although one should of course be careful to use it correctly.

Correct me if I'm wrong, Wochik, but usually, you would use 'although' when you're starting a new sentence with the exception or condition, or when the exception or condition is long enough to form its own sentence, while 'albeit' is restricted to short exceptions or conditions.

The Nomadic Peoples of Damanucus wrote:Correct me if I'm wrong, Wochik, but usually, you would use 'although' when you're starting a new sentence with the exception or condition, or when the exception or condition is long enough to form its own sentence, while 'albeit' is restricted to short exceptions or conditions.

That's not been my experience, but the difference could easily be national. It's not one of those things that's in my face all the time, like throwing a U into words that end in OR, where one is correct in one place and the other is correct elsewhere.

The Kapokanas of Wonderchicken wrote:like throwing a U into words that end in OR

Sorry for the nitpick, but wasn't the U there originally before being cast out by the Americans? They are French-derived words after all.

Hajirah

Oh, hang on, I got this. English teacher coming through.

"Although" is a conjunction, used generally to extend a sentence with an opposing point. It's just another way of saying "however" and "but". Technically speaking, you shouldn't start a sentence with a conjunction, however it happens anyway. Just one of those things I guess.

The Nomadic Peoples of Damanucus wrote:Correct me if I'm wrong, Wochik, but usually, you would use 'although' when you're starting a new sentence with the exception or condition, or when the exception or condition is long enough to form its own sentence, while 'albeit' is restricted to short exceptions or conditions.

You certainly can do that. My experience is that "although" is the more widely applicable word, while "albeit" functions approximately* like the phrase "although it is" in one word and has more restricted usage. "Although" functions rather like "but", but produces a different stress. "Although" tends to introduce a limiting factor or exception, in spite of which the clause it modifies is true, while "but" tends to introduce something that contradicts or negates the preceding statement to some extent. They're also grammatically different (which probably has a degree of relevance to their difference in meaning, but I only woke up about half an hour ago, so that's a step beyond what I can manage) - "but" is a coordinating conjunction, requiring a clause of phrase either side of it where each has equal weight. "Although", being a subordinating conjunction, introduces a clause that can only serve to modify the other one in the sentence.
"The chicken crossed the road frequently, although it was hardly the safest of undertakings."
You'd be more likely to use "but" in a sentence like:
"The chicken crossed the road frequently, but he did not always get to the other side."

"Albeit", meanwhile, is a bit trickier because it needs to be clear what word it applies to, and it cannot be followed by something that could stand as its own sentence (presumably because the verb is already implied within the word "albeit"). I'm not sure how exactly that all fits together grammatically, but there are cases where it does work and cases where it definitely doesn't.
"The chicken crossed the road frequently, albeit often without success."
"The chicken was a prolific crosser of roads, albeit one with only limited success."
Those are fine. "Albeit" applies to "frequently" in the first example, telling us that the chicken was also "often without success". "Albeit" applies to "crosser of roads" in the second example, telling us that the chicken was not merely a "crosser of roads", but a "crosser of roads with only limited success".

This is not fine:
"The chicken crossed the road frequently, albeit it was hardly the safest of undertakings."
"It was" is superfluous and "albeit" would seem to apply to "frequently", but the clause which follows applies to the act of crossing the road.

It's a fiddly topic.

*I don't have a better equivalent at this point in time, but this one is imprecise and certainly would not always fit.

The Corporate Conglomerate of Arestris wrote:Technically speaking, you shouldn't start a sentence with a conjunction, however it happens anyway.

This is one of those rules where a more sensible rule has been oversimplified to prohibit perfectly permissible sentences for the sake of more people remembering it (which, in any case, doesn't really work, since in colloquial English, such fragments are incredibly useful and avoid a lot of unnecessary repetition). Because they are subordinating conjunctions, starting a sentence with "because" or "although" is allowed in formal English, so long as the clause which they are modifying is also included. Do you see what I did there?

"Why did the chicken cross the road?" "Because he heard about the fantastic prices at Lidl and needed a new shower head."
This would not be acceptable in formal English, and is what the rule attempts to prohibit. "Because" is in a separate sentence which does not include the clause it's referring to. You can, however, do this:
"Because the chicken needed a new shower head, he decided that the risks inherent to crossing the road were worth bearing."
Likewise:
"Although crossing the road had always been a hazardous undertaking, the chicken decided to do so for the sake of Lidl's fantastic prices."
It simply requires that you attach the clauses together.

Sunthreit

This is the point at which I notice my dozens of superfluous and misplaced commas. Guess who's not going through that post again to fix them.

Sunthreit

I am in Vancouver Canada, yayyyy 5 hour wait!!! And then 9hour drive yayyyyy

Quensatango, Sunthreit, and Memaslovakia

The Constitutional Republic of Sunthreit wrote:Sorry for the nitpick, but wasn't the U there originally before being cast out by the Americans? They are French-derived words after all.

As an American, I reserve the right to treat the American spelling as the correct spelling. ;)

Sunthreit

The Kapokanas of Wonderchicken wrote:As an American, I reserve the right to treat the American spelling as the correct spelling. ;)

Besides, if you go back to Latin roots they all tend to have "or" endings >:)

Wonderchicken

To borrow from Ray Stevens:

"Maybe a 'croissant.' Is that right? The French make everything so difficult. Why don't they just call it a bun?"

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