NationStates RMB

WA Delegate: The MikesHope Essence of Mikeswill (elected )

BoardActivity History Admin Rank

Most Nations: 23rd Most World Assembly Endorsements: 192nd
World Factbook Entry

Welcome to NationStates, aiming to become one of the strongest ranking regions. Pro-Economy, Pro-Society, Pro-WA, Pro-Peace; Join our glory! Above all, freedom for all nations to control their own destinies in a region free from war.

NationStates stands AGAINST the Security Council

Endorsement Limit: 19

Forums: http://www.runboard.com/bnationstates

Regional Embassies signal that two regions have established formal ties with one another.
The NationStates Region remains a Neutral Region ~ Friends With All; Aligned With None.

Today's Featured Nation:
The People's Republic of Focai



  1. 2

    NationStates Endorsement Policy and Limits

    FactbookPolitics by Mikeswill . 951 reads.

  2. 36

    Against Security Council Statement

    FactbookPolitics by Mikeswill . 2,329 reads.

Embassies: the Pacific, The East Pacific, the West Pacific, The North Pacific, the South Pacific, Osiris, Balder, Europe, Capitalist Paradise, One big Island, Nation States, NationStates 2, Mikeswill, Trav khar, Gatesville Inc, International Western Union, and 5 others.Greater Dienstad, Antarctic Oasis, The Coalition of Democratic Nations, India, and Central Pacific Empire.

Tags: Independent, Anti-Security Council, Pacifist, Founderless, Gargantuan, and Neutral.

Regional Power: Very High

NationStates contains 541 nations, the 23rd most in the world.

Today's World Census Report

The Largest Welfare Programs in NationStates

Governments ranked highly spend the most on social welfare programs. Nations ranked low tend to have weak or non-existent government welfare.

As a region, NationStates is ranked 4,018th in the world for Largest Welfare Programs.

NationWA CategoryMotto
341.The Most Serene Republic of -George HarrisonLeft-wing Utopia“All Things Must Pass”
342.The Federation of DectophoInoffensive Centrist Democracy“Fléctere si néqueo súperos Acheronta movebo”
343.The Free Land of Crosby Stills NashLeft-wing Utopia“Teach Your Children”
344.The Empire of Phoenix KingdomInoffensive Centrist Democracy“The phoenix must burn to emerge”
345.The Rogue Nation of Jim MorrisonLeft-wing Utopia“Cancel My Subscription To The Resurrection”
346.The Rogue Nation of Houses of the HolyLeft-wing Utopia“The Song Remains The Same”
347.The Commonwealth of The United Lands of EarthLiberal Democratic Socialists“What ever is done in the dark will always come to light”
348.The Republic of Thessal0nInoffensive Centrist Democracy“Freedom Under Guidance From Above”
349.The Community of Aaron SwartzLeft-wing Utopia“Information is power.”
350.The Rogue Nation of Steal This BookLeft-wing Utopia“Survive! Fight! Liberate!”
«12. . .32333435363738. . .5455»

Regional Happenings

More...

NationStates Regional Message Board

Sunday, 28 August, 2016 :: 10

Can you coax your mind from its wandering
and keep to the original oneness?
Can you let your body become
supple as a newborn child's?
Can you cleanse your inner vision
until you see nothing but the light?
Can you love people and lead them
without imposing your will?
Can you deal with the most vital matters
by letting events take their course?
Can you step back from your own mind
and thus understand all things?

Giving birth and nourishing,
having without possessing,
acting with no expectations,
leading and not trying to control:
this is the supreme virtue.

I Have A Dream
In Memory of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968)
August 28, 1963

I am happy to join with you today in what will go down in history as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.
Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand today, signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of their captivity.

But one hundred years later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. So we have come here today to dramatize a shameful condition.

In a sense we have come to our nation's capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the unalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check, a check which has come back marked "insufficient funds." But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation. So we have come to cash this check -- a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to make real the promises of democracy. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quick sands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood. Now is the time to make justice a reality for all of God's children.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro's legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. There will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights. The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges.

But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.

We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. We must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force. The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to a distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny. They have come to realize that their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom. We cannot walk alone.

As we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall always march ahead. We cannot turn back. There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, "When will you be satisfied?" We can never be satisfied as long as the Negro is the victim of the unspeakable horrors of police brutality. We can never be satisfied, as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the Negro's basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as our children are stripped of their selfhood and robbed of their dignity by signs stating "For Whites Only". We cannot be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. Some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive.

Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. Let us not wallow in the valley of despair.

I say to you today, my friends, so even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal."

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at the table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a state sweltering with the heat of injustice, sweltering with the heat of oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day, down in Alabama, with its vicious racists, with its governor having his lips dripping with the words of interposition and nullification; one day right there in Alabama, little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together.

This is our hope. This is the faith that I go back to the South with. With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

This will be the day when all of God's children will be able to sing with a new meaning, "My country, 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim's pride, from every mountainside, let freedom ring."

And if America is to be a great nation this must become true. So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania!

Let freedom ring from the snowcapped Rockies of Colorado!

Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California!

But not only that; let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia!

Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee!

Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

And when this happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, "Free at last! free at last! thank God Almighty, we are free at last!"

Arrogant Diplomacy is ranked 1,241st in the world and 1st in NationStates for Most Authoritarian, with 7.23 Stalins.

I'M NUMBER 1
I'M NUMBER 1

HaHAHAHAHAHAHa

Today’s Featured Nation:
The People's Republic of Focai

” Freedom of Choice and Independence”

WA Category: Capitalist Paradise

Civil Rights: Very Good
Economy: Powerhouse
Political Freedoms: Very Good

Focai's national animal is the Black Panther, which teeters on the brink of extinction due to widespread deforestation.
Focai is ranked 104,655th in the world and 264th in NationStates for Most Conservative, scoring 38.75 on the Bush-Santorum Dawning Terror Index.

The MikesHope Essence of Mikeswill

Taut

The Mikes Hope Essence of Mikeswill graciously extends a warm welcome to our newest Nations:

The Free Land of Dboda
The Republic of Fishiza
The People's Republic of Teeth15

Our Esteemed Region continues to attract the Most
Enlightened Nations in the JenGov Land.

MH

Taut

Friday’s Answer: What is Sweden?

Congratulations:
The Nomadic Peoples of Naram-Sin

Only telegrammed responses will be considered
All responses must be in the form of a question

MYTHOLOGY

GREEK GODS SWORE THEIR MOST SACRED OATHS IN THE NAME OF THIS DAUGHTER OF OCEANUS & HER RIVER

Who is … ?

Monday, 29 August, 2016 :: 11

We join spokes together in a wheel,
but it is the center hole
that makes the wagon move.

We shape clay into a pot,
but it is the emptiness inside
that holds whatever we want.

We hammer wood for a house,
but it is the inner space
that makes it livable.

We work with being,
but non-being is what we use.

WKNS Radio: Remembering ~
Alberto Aguilera Valadez aka Juan Gabriel
(January 7, 1950 – August 28, 2016)

"Hasta Que Te Conocí"

No sabía de tristezas, ni de lagrimas, ni nada
Que me hicieran llorar
Yo sabía de cariño, de ternura,
Porque a mí desde pequeño
Eso me enseñó mamá
Eso me enseño mamá
Eso y muchas cosas más
Yo jamás sufrí, yo jamás lloré
Yo era muy feliz... yo vivía muy bien

Yo vivía tan distino, algo hermoso, algo divino
Lleno de felicidad
Yo sabía de alegrias, la belleza de la vida,
Pero no de soledad, pero no de soledad
De eso y muchas cosas más
Yo jamas sufrí, yo jamas lloré,
Yo era muy feliz... yo vivía muy bien

Hasta que te conocí,
Vi la vida con dolor
No te miento, fuá feliz,
Aunque con muy poco amor
Y muy tarde comprendí,
Que no te debía amar
Porque ahora pienso en tí,
Más que ayer, mucho más
[bis]

Yo jamas sufrí, yo jamas lloré,
Yo era muy feliz... pero te encontré

(ándale)

Ahora quiero que me digas
Si valió o no la pena
El haberte conocido
Porque no te creo más
Y es que tú fuiste muy mala
Si, muy mala conmigo
Por eso no te quiero
No te quiero ver jamás
Vete, vete, vete
Vete de mi vera
Vete a dondequiera
Vete, no te quiero
No te quiero ver jamás
Vete, vete...

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